Articles tagged "national book award"

Required Friday Reading (8/10/18)

It’s important, now more than ever, to continue reading, reflecting, and engaging in open dialogue about the issues facing us all as a nation. Here are our picks to help you do just that:

A HOPE MORE POWERFUL THAN THE SEA: One Refugee’s Incredible Story of Love, Loss, and Survival by Melissa Fleming

2018 Alex Award Winner

2018 ALA Amelia Bloomer List

“This poignant tale of survival and loss gives immediacy to the plight of Syrian refugees. Fleming’s skillful writing brings new vividness to Doaa Al Zamel’s dramatic story. This book amply demonstrates why Al Zamel has since become a symbol of hope for other refugees. Fleming should be congratulated for bringing [this] inspiring and illuminating story to the page.” — Publishers Weekly

BUTTERFLY: From Refugee to Olympian – My Story of Rescue, Hope, and Triumph by Yusra Mardini

BUTTERFLY is a powerful story of survival, inspiration, and hope with a resounding message: no one chooses to be a refugee; rather, horrific circumstances force ordinary people to take extraordinary measures to save themselves. This unforgettable memoir shines a spotlight on the refugee experience and the role sports can play in giving a voice to those affected by conflict throughout the world… Teens who enjoyed I AM MALALA will find another heroine in this inspirational memoir of a Syrian swimmer who became an advocate for refugees.” Booklist, starred review

CITY OF THORNS: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp by Ben Rawlence

Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist

Kirkus Reviews Best Books of the Year

“[A] remarkable book…Like Dadaab itself, the story has no conclusion. It is a portrait, beautifully and movingly painted. And it is more than that. At a time when newspapers are filled with daily images of refugees arriving in boats on Europe’s shores, when politicians and governments grapple with solutions to migration and erect ever larger walls and fences, it is an important reminder that a vast majority of the world’s refugees never get as far as a boat or a border of the developed world.” — Caroline Moorehead, The New York Times Book Review

IN THE COUNTRY WE LOVE: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero

“Guerrero relates her struggle to hold her life together, get through high school and college, and find her feet in the world—challenges that will resonate with many readers… [She] writes with humor and heartbreaking honesty. Offering readers the story she needed to hear as a child, Guerrero shines a light on this country’s flawed immigration system, eloquently calling for reform without diminishing her appreciation for the opportunities US citizenship has afforded her. A timely and enlightening read.” — Booklist

SPARE PARTS: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis

“A gratifying human interest story that calls attention to the plight and promise of America’s undocumented youth.” — Library Journal

“Davis takes what could have been another feel-good story of triumphant underdogs and raises the stakes by examining the difficulties of these young immigrants in the context of the societal systems that they briefly and temporarily overcame.” — Publishers Weekly

ONE PERSON, NO VOTE: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy by Carol Anderson

“This whiplash-inducing chronicle of how a nation that just a few short years ago elected its first black president now finds itself in the throes of a deceitful and craven effort to rip this most essential of American rights from millions of its citizens.” — Booklist, starred review

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Remembering Tom Wolfe

Tom Wolfe (1930-2018) was a pioneering voice of his generation. We are extremely honored to have published fourteen of his books, including THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIESTHE RIGHT STUFFTHE ELECTRIC KOOL-AID ACID TEST, THE KANDY-KOLORED TANGERINE-FLAKE STREAMLINE BABY, RADICAL CHIC & MAU-MAUING THE FLAK CATCHERS, THE PAINTED WORD, A MAN IN FULL, and I AM CHARLOTTE SIMMONS.

One of the founders of the New Journalism movement (he’s credited with coining the term, “The Me Decade”), and a reporter for The Washington Post, the New York Herald Tribune, Esquire, and New York magazine, Wolfe has been honored with the National Book Award, the John Dos Passos Award, the Washington Irving Medal for Literary Excellence, the National Humanities Medal, and National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. readmoreremove

2017 National Book Award Winners

Congratulations to Frank Bidart, who won the 2017 National Book Award in Poetry for HALF-LIGHT: Collected Poems 1965-2016!

And congratulations to Jesmyn Ward on her second National Book Award in Fiction win! We proudly published her 2011 NBA Fiction Award winner, SALVAGE THE BONES, as well as her bestselling and acclaimed memoir, MEN WE REAPED.|

And The National Book Award Goes To… EVAN OSNOS!

We’re thrilled to share the news that the National Book Award in the Nonfiction category went to Evan Osnos for AGE OF AMBITION published by FSG.

The book explores China’s ongoing transformation into an economic superpower, and the clash between its economic progress and its authoritarian government’s crackdown on social freedoms.

Congrats to all involved!

Books for Boys

This season Macmillan Library is all about boys and their adventures in growing up.  The boys whose DIY robot bests MIT, the boys who attend a terrifyingly real boarding school (in the future), and the boys who use gaming as a means of salvation…   We’re getting to know them all. Won’t you join us?

SPARE PARTS by Joshua Davis

“Davis takes what could have been another feel-good story of triumphant underdogs and raises the stakes by examining the difficulties of these young immigrants in the context of the societal systems that they briefly and temporarily overcame.”—Publishers Weekly

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WOLF IN WHITE VAN by John Darnielle

National Book Award Finalist

“A pop culture-infused novel that thoughtfully and nonjudgmentally considers the dark side of nerddom.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

GOODHOUSE by Peyton Marshall

“A cut above the strong recent crop of dystopian futures, with a sympathetic protagonist, a believably degenerated society, and harrowing pacing, this deserves a wide audience.”—Library Journal, starred review

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Happy National Poetry Month!

Happy National Poetry Month! We're fortunate to have an abundance of great poetry books—so many, that we've created an Edelweiss collection for you. Here are a few that we're loving:

CARIBOU by Charles Wright
Charles Wright’s truth—the truth of nature, of man’s yearning for the divine, of aging—is at the heart of the renowned poet’s latest collection. “Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, National Book Critics Circle Award, National Book Award, among other honors, Wright offers up a spare, no-nonsense approach that serves his subjects well, enabling a kind of spiritual poetry for those who resist spirituality. Pointed as ever, his work continues to engage and explore life's unsolvable mysteries.” — Library Journal, starred review 

DIRECTING HERBERT WHITE by James Franco
The debut poetry collection by the multi-talented James Franco (yes, THAT James Franco), has Hollywood—fame, celebrity, the promise of becoming an artist—at its center. “Franco’s bold and magnetic examination of life in the mirrored hall of make-believe and fame taps deeply into our collective mythology.” — Booklist

METAPHYSICAL DOG by Frank Bidart
Bidart's collection was a finalist for the National Book Award and recently won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry. “The poems of METAPHYSICAL DOG are at once emotionally bracing and full of intellectual reward. Bidart is widely admired by other influential poets; he seems in line for even more attention than he has received.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

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We’ve got 2013 National Book Award nominees! WooHoo!

Over the course of this week the National Book Awards longlist was published and we are delighted to have several nominees! 

Longlist for Nonfiction

THE UNWINDING: An Inner History of the New America by George Packer
One of the finest political journalists of our generation, Packer weaves together complex narratives from the past three decades to create a riveting examination of a nation in crisis. It's already received three starred reviews, including this one from Booklist: "Packer offers an illuminating, in-depth, sometimes frightening view of the complexities of decline and the enduring hope for recovery."
Available in hardcover from Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Longlist for Poetry

METAPHYSICAL DOG by Frank Bidart
A vital, searching new collection from one of finest American poets at work today. "The poems of METAPHYSICAL DOG are at once emotionally bracing and full of intellectual reward. Bidart is widely admired by other influential poets; he seems in line for even more attention than he has received." --Publishers Weekly, starred review & PW Pick.
Available in hardcover from Farrar, Straus and Giroux

INCARNADINE by Mary Szybist
The beautiful and inventive second book by the poet Mary Szybist, whose first book, GRANTED, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. "Whether or not readers are attuned to the religious content, these are gorgeous lyrics, in traditional and invented forms—one poem is a diagrammed sentence while another radiates from an empty space at the center of the page—which create close encounters with not-quite-paraphrasable truths. This is essential poetry." --Publishers Weekly, starred review & PW Pick.
Available in trade paperback from Graywolf Press

Longlist for Fiction

SOMEONE by Alice McDermott
The NBA nomination is another well-deserved accolade that this “stunning hymn to the ordinary” (More Magazine) has received in addition to being a PW Pick of the Week, September Indie Next selection and recipient of four starred pre-publication reviews. People gave it 3 ½ stars in the main review of the Sept. 16 issue and many others are singing McDermott's praises, including The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, Vogue, Elle, O Magazine, and NPR's Fresh Air.
Available in hardcover from Farrar, Straus and Giroux.


Finalists for the award will be announced on October 16 and the winners on November 20. Congratulations to all nominees!   readmoreremove

Salvage the Bones Wins the 2011 National Book Award in Fiction!

Major congratulations are due to Jesmyn Ward, author of the 2011 National Book Award in Fiction winner: SALVAGE THE BONES.

Ward's gritty yet tender novel about family and poverty in the days leading up to Hurricane Katrina is both beautiful and brutal. Pregnant fourteen-year-old Esch, her brothers, and their mostly absent father are preparing for the storm, but are unprepared for the aftermath. 

When she accepted the award, Ward said,

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"I understood that I wanted to write about the experiences of the poor, and the black and the rural people of the South, so that the culture that marginalized us for so long would see that our stories were as universal, our lives as fraught and lovely and important, as theirs."

You can re-watch the full National Book Award ceremony hosted by John Lithgow at NationalBook.org.

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The National Book Award Finalists!

We interrupt our regularly scheduled blogging to bring you the National Book Award-finalists from Macmillan!

Fiction: 
SALVAGE THE BONES by Jesmyn Ward (Bloomsbury USA)

Nonfiction:
THE CONVERT by Deborah Baker (Graywolf Press)

Poetry:
THE CHAMELEON COUCH by Yusef Komunyakaa (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
DOUBLE SHADOW by Carl Phillips (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

See the full list of NBA-nominees at Publishers Weekly.

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Our National Book Award Finalist

The National Book Award nominations were just announced, and one of our titles, Secret Historian, was nominated!

Drawn from the secret, never-before-seen diaries, journals, and sexual
records of the novelist, poet, and university professor Samuel M.
Steward, Secret Historian is a sensational reconstruction of one of the more extraordinary hidden lives of the twentieth century.

"Spring’s sympathetic and entertaining story of a life registers the
limitations imposed on homosexuals by a repressive society, but also
celebrates the creativity and daring with which Steward tested them." --Publishers Weekly

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