Articles tagged "race"

Nonfiction Round-Up (12/04/19)

The first behind-the-scenes look at the most enigmatic FLOTUS in history, the true story of the Greely Expedition, a timely memoir on race and familial reconciliation, and a study on twentieth-century dictators–find it all in this nonfiction round-up.

FREE, MELANIA: The Unauthorized Biography by Kate Bennett

An insider’s look at Melania Trump, beginning with her childhood in Slovenia up to her days in the White House.

LABYRINTH OF ICE: The Triumphant and Tragic Greely Polar Expedition by Buddy Levy

A December Indie Next List pick!

“This gripping book is a testament to the bravery and sheer doggedness of men determined to survive despite harsh conditions. Readers of polar histories, U.S. Navy history, and other armchair adventurers will enjoy this work.”–Library Journal

THE BROKEN ROAD: George Wallace and a Daughter’s Journey to Reconciliation by Peggy Wallace Kennedy

“In this thoughtful, evenhanded debut, Kennedy, the daughter of former Alabama governor George Wallace, reflects on her life with the staunch segregationist.”–Publishers Weekly

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Nonfiction Round-Up (8/7/19)

Surviving marital struggles and discovering a secret heritage–all in today’s nonfiction round-up!

THE LONG ACCOMPLISHMENT: A Memoir of Hope and Struggle in Matrimony by Rick Moody

“Moody’s sheer delight with language and his clever turns of phrase hint at a sense of wonder and hope, while his Knausgaardian introspection leaves him contemplating the intersection of fate and magic, recognizing that good fortune seems preordained while transcending tragedy requires something magical, namely, the power of love.”–Booklist

WHEN I WAS WHITE: A Memoir by Sarah Valentine

“We feel every step of Valentine’s struggle, from feeling physically broken to becoming emotionally stronger as she reaches for self-acceptance and self-definition.”–Booklist

Maximum Shelf: A GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD

Today’s Maximum Shelf pick is Therese Anne Fowler’s exploration of class, race, and heartrending star-crossed love, A GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD.

For fans of Celeste Ng and Jodi Picoult comes a stunning page-turner about two very different families living side by side in an idyllic neighborhood–and the summer that changes their lives forever.

In Oak Knoll, a verdant, tight-knit North Carolina neighborhood, professor of forestry and ecology Valerie Alston-Holt is raising her bright and talented biracial son. Xavier is headed to college in the fall, and after years of single parenting, Valerie is facing the prospect of an empty nest. All is well until the Whitmans move in next door–an apparently traditional family with new money, ambition, and a secretly troubled teenaged daughter.

Thanks to his thriving local business, Brad Whitman is something of a celebrity around town, and he’s made a small fortune on his customer service and charm, while his wife, Julia, escaped her trailer park upbringing for the security of marriage and homemaking. Their new house is more than she ever imagined for herself, and who wouldn’t want to live in Oak Knoll?

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A Meteor Shower of Stars for Macmillan!

These forthcoming titles all received multiple starred reviews!

Fiction

NINTH HOUSE by Leigh Bardugo

“With an aura of both enchantment and authenticity, Bardugo’s compulsively readable novel leaves a portal ajar for equally dazzling sequels.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“This atmospheric contemporary novel steeped in the spirit of a mystical New Haven is part mystery, part story of a young woman finding purpose in a dark world, and is the first in a potential series. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Adults are just as enamored of Bardugo’s YA novels as teens are, and many have been anxiously and curiously awaiting this one.”–Booklist, starred review

MACHINE by Susan Steinberg

“Teenagers spend a hazy summer at the shore. One girl comes to terms with both her emerging independence and the mysterious death of a girl just like her… Heartbreaking, eerie, and acutely observant.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“What makes this tale so thrilling is Steinberg’s artistry with form; she fractures narrative into its fundamental parts. Steinberg writes prose with a poet’s sense of meter and line, and a velocity recalling the novels of Joan Didion. The result is a dizzying work that perfectly evokes the feeling of spinning out of control.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

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An Interview with Jennifer Berry Hawes

After the tragic shootings at the Mother Emanuel AME church, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jennifer Berry Hawes knew this was a story that needed telling. In GRACE WILL LEAD US HOME: The Charleston Church Massacre and the Hard, Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness, she offers a moving portrait of the events and emotions that emerged in the massacre’s wake. Today, Hawes joins us to share more about her writing experience, to highlight a courageous librarian named Cynthia Hurd, and to talk about life as a Charlestonian since that terrible day in 2015.

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How did you decide you wanted to write a book on the massacre?

I didn’t think about writing a book until five or six months after June 17, 2015. I had been covering the aftermath of the shooting for the newspaper I work for in Charleston and had begun to realize that, while the massacre itself had caused such unimaginable pain for the survivors and the victims’ loved ones, it was only the opening chapter of a much more complex story. I have since come to think of mass shootings as akin to tossing a rock into a pond. The initial impact disrupts the surface in obvious ways. But then ripple upon ripple of disruption spreads from that impact. This is what happens after these events, and happened here, from divisions among families and the church to divisions within families grappling with so much pain. Add in critical issues to our nation–race and gun violence–and this became a much more complicated story than we could tell in our newspaper. My editors agreed. As people who live and breathe Charleston, we wanted to bear witness to this deeper narrative.

Tell us a little about the librarian, Cynthia Hurd, one of the nine people killed in the church.

To me, the lush garden of climbing roses and overflowing window boxes that Cynthia meticulously tended outside of her home beautifully illustrates her essence. She was a helper, a nurturer, a warm spirit who greeted people with a wide, toothy smile. When her sister, Jackie, was diagnosed with cancer just a couple of weeks before the shooting, Jackie called Cynthia first. “I got you,” Cynthia promised, and everyone knew she meant it. When Cynthia agreed to stay at Bible study on June 17, she had plans to go with Jackie, who lived two states away, to meet with doctors and discuss her treatment options the following week.

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BLACKkKLANSMAN Wins an Oscar!

The movie BlacKkKlansman, adapted from Ron Stallworth’s BLACK KLANSMAN: Race, Hate, and the Undercover Investigation of a Lifetime, won Best Adapted Screenplay at last night’s Oscars ceremony!

Congratulations to this incredible story and the directors, writers, actors, and producers who brought it to life on the big screen.

Nonfiction Round-Up (2/13/19)

Race in America, a legendary film, and an outspoken Feminist are the varied topics covered in today’s Nonfiction Round-up.

GOOD KIDS, BAD CITY: A Story of Race and Wrongful Conviction in America by Kyle Swenson
“Cinematically written, this powerful tragedy of racial injustice and urban dysfunction will make readers question the idea that America can promise ‘justice for all.'” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

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Nonfiction Round-Up (2/6/19)

Race, Love, the Wild West, and becoming a Badass–dive into this week’s nonfiction round-up!

BROWN WHITE BLACK: An American Family at the Intersection of Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Religion by Nishta J. Mehra
Two starred reviews!
“Mehra’s nuanced and thought-provoking work resonates on multiple levels—from the immigrant experience and race relations to accepting one’s sexuality, adoption, parenthood, and more. Excellent for readers interested in family and issues of identity in America.”–Library Journal, starred review

HARD TO LOVE: Essays and Confessions by Briallen Hopper
“Whether she is writing about her fraught decision to become pregnant with donated sperm, a friend’s bout with cancer, baking (‘a code for conveying care safely without the ambiguity of words’), the collective energy of the Women’s March, or a visit to the Foundling Museum, Hopper’s essays seem like love songs, as well: delicate, thoughtful elegies to friendship, compassion, and grace. A fresh, well-crafted collection.”--Kirkus Reviews, starred review

WILD BILL: The True Story of the American Frontier’s First Gunfighter by Tom Clavin
“A vigorous yarn concerning the man who, by Clavin’s (DODGE CITY) account, set the template for the Wild West gunslinger…. Good history accessibly and ably told.” —Kirkus Reviews

THE WARRIOR CODE: 11 Principles to Unleash the Badass Inside of You by Tee Marie Hanible with Denene Millner
“Hanible’s practical, no-nonsense advice and her candidness about both her missteps and all she’s endured and conquered make her an impressive role model and guide for women and men of all ages who are navigating challenges in their lives.”–Booklist

SUPER MEGA Stars On Stars On Stars On Stars (1/11/19)

Forecast calls for a meteor shower! Make room on your shelves for our many STARS.

Fiction:

THE NOWHERE CHILD by Christian White
“White’s tightly woven debut thriller has already won the Victorian Premier Literary Award in Australia; its arrival Stateside comes highly recommended.”–Library Journal, starred review

“The impatient may be tempted to skip ahead, but they shouldn’t. Thriller fans will want to savor every crumb of evidence and catch every clue. White is definitely a writer to watch.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

TRUST EXERCISE by Susan Choi
[T]he writing (exquisite) and the observations (cuttingly accurate) make Choi’s latest both wrenching and one-of-a-kind. Never sentimental; always thrillingly alive.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Fiercely intelligent, impeccably written, and observed with searing insight, this novel is destined to be a classic.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

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June 2018 Nonfiction

Add these June nonfiction titles to your library’s shelves today:

THE THIRD BANK OF THE RIVER: Power and Survival in the Twenty-First Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold
A veteran journalist traces the war over the Amazon as activists, locals, and indigenous tribes struggle to save the jungle from the threat of loggers, drug lords, and corrupt politicians. “A saddening, maddening story that draws much-needed attention to crime without punishment in a remote—but not invisible—part of the world.” —Kirkus Reviews

WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE: Robert F Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our unfinished Conversation About Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson
Also available in audio
A stunning follow up to TEARS WE CANNOT STOP, WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE is another timely exploration of America’s tortured racial politics. This book exists at the tense intersection of the conflict between politics and prophecy—of whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape. “After providing the backstories and historical context of the participants, Dyson offers contemporary examples of public figures who struggle for equality. The result is a moving ode to the potentiality of American social progress.” —Booklist, starred review

WHAT WOULD THE GREAT ECONOMISTS DO?: How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve Today’s Biggest Problems by Linda Yueh
A timely exploration of the life and work of world-changing thinkers—from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes—and how their ideas would solve the great economic problems we face today. “Few economics books are able to address major problems, present leading and sometimes conflicting theories, and be accessible to the casual reader. Yueh takes current issues affecting today’s economy and attacks them through the eyes of a dozen leading economists, from the historic to the contemporary, clearly applying their work to modern problems.” —Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

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