Articles tagged "wedding"

Memorial Day Weekend 2017 Reading Roundup

Memorial Day weekend is here (hooray!) and we’re stacking our to-read piles with these major media-recommended books:
Entertainment Weekly — Summer’s Must-Read Books

BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
Cartoonist Tamaki dazzles with her impressive range in this collection, marrying each short story to a different artistic style. Whether she’s writing and drawing about the pitfalls of technology or ruminating on nostalgia, her work is lush, vibrant, and packed with emotion.

LIFE IN CODE by Ellen Ullman
Ullman, a computer programmer since the ’70s, expands on the themes she covered in 1997’s CLOSE TO THE MACHINE with pieces about what it was like on the forefront of the tech revolution, being a woman in a male-donimated industry, and how the tech landscape has (and hasn’t) changed.

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
In Ginder’s glitzy beach read, things spiral out of control in the days leading up to a wedding as a charmingly dysfunctional family—brimming with oddball stepsiblings—does everything it can to sabotage the nuptials.

The New York TimesSummer Reading Recommendations, From Novelists Who Own Bookstores

Jonathan Lethem, author of A GAMBLER’S ANATOMY & owner of Red Gap Books, a used and rare bookstore in Blue Hill, ME recommends BROKEN RIVER by J. Robert Lennon
“It’s a tense, surprising thriller, with perverse overtones of the Coen brothers variety, but containing an enigmatic narrative device, a kind of ‘haunting of the point-of-view’ – one which proves, as ever, that the novel can do things nothing but the novel can do. I’m almost ready to reread it.”

Jeff Kinney, author of the bestselling “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” series and owner of An Unlikely Story in Plainville, MA recommends RADICAL CANDOR by Kim Scott (“Scott’s experiences leading teams at Google and Apple led to this book, which espouses a workplace culture where leaders care deeply about their employees and challenge them to be their best selves.”) and BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer (“The cover alone had me hooked. Is the protagonist a plant? An animal? Something in between?”).

Louise Erdrich, author of LAROSE & owner of Birchbark Books in Minneapolis, MN recommends THE SONG POET by Kao Kalia Yang
“The exquisite story of Kao Kalia Yang’s father, village life, war life, refugee life, then a St. Paul housing project; America’s secret war in Laos; and a people’s history as sung by Bee Yang and remembered in fascinating and poetic detail by his daughter.”

Buzzfeed’s “Thrillers You Will Devour This Summer

IT’S ALWAYS THE HUSBAND by Michele Campbell
Fans of Ruth Ware and Gillian Flynn meet your next obsession. Kate, Aubrey, and Jenny were inseparable in college. 20 years later, one of them is found dead. How did it come to this? Alternating between their college years and the present day, readers slowly come to realize that their friendship was anything but perfect. But can feelings that strong really lead to murder, or will everyone assume, as is often the case, that it’s always the husband? Only one way for you to find out… readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (4/6/17 Edition)

It’s a rainy & foggy #ThrillerThursday here in Gotham—perfect for curling up with one of these mysteries:

THE LOST ORDER by Steve Berry
The Knights of the Golden Circle was the largest and most dangerous clandestine organization in American history, hiding billions in stolen gold and silver across the United States. Now, 160 years later, two factions of what remains of the Knights of the Golden Circle want that lost treasure—one to spend it for their own ends, the other to preserve it. Thrust into this battle is former Justice Department agent Cotton Malone, whose connection to the knights is deeper than he ever imagined. “Berry’s fans will love his latest endeavor as he brings more detail into Malone’s past and how he came to be known as Cotton. …Berry has written another gripping novel.” — Associated Press

DATE WITH DEATH by Julia Chapman
The debut of a delightful new English village mystery series set in the Yorkshire Dales starring Delilah Metcalfe, the owner of The Dales Dating Agency, and Samson O’Brien, private investigator. “The cozy-sounding title notwithstanding, this series launch by Chapman (a pen name for British author Julia Stagg) is an atmospheric traditional mystery with a vivid sense of place and spirited characters who drive the engaging plot. Recommended for Julia Spencer-Fleming fans or those who appreciate complex mysteries set in English villages.” — Library Journal, starred review

DYING ON THE VINE by Marla Cooper
Spirited wedding planner Kelsey McKenna juggles a sabotaged wedding and a cold-blooded killer in beautiful California wine country in this hilarious follow-up to TERROR IN TAFFETA. “The second in this cozy series offers both a behind-the-scenes look at what goes into making the perfect wedding and a surprisingly tricky mystery.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

The Giant 2016 Graphic Novel Roundup!

The saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words” and that’s certainly true of graphic novels. Thanks to comic book characters dominating pop culture, the format has been enjoying a boom and readers are coming to the medium in droves.

Publishers Weekly recently profiled graphic novel publisher Papercutz, which publishes between 50 and 60 books per year, mostly aimed at children ages 8–12. Their Super Genius imprint publishes books for teen readers and a new imprint called Charmz, aimed at pre-teen & early teen girls, will launch in May 2017.

Papercutz’s catalog includes bestselling licensed media properties, such as Barbie, Dennis the Menace, the Smurfs, Lego’s Ninjago and Bionicle series (though Lego moved the licenses to Little, Brown last year), a line of classic Disney graphic novels (DANTE’S INFERNO becomes MICKEY’S INFERNO, and X-MICKEY features X-Files-type supernatural escapades), as well as graphic novels based on a first-look deal with children’s TV network Nickelodeon.

Papercutz also rebooted select classics (WUTHERING HEIGHTS, THE JUNGLE, and THE INVISIBLE MAN to name a few) with artwork from acclaimed contemporary artists such as Rick Geary, Peter Kuper, and Gahan Wilson. Their first list in 2005 featured a manga-style graphic novel revival of the classic Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys adventure series, which are still in print and have together sold more than 800,000 copies.

Foreign imports are big, including France’s popular Ariol series by Emmanuel Guibert and Guillaume Bianco, and Antonello Dalena’s Ernest and Rebecca series. Italy’s bestselling prose series starring a time-traveling squirrel named Geronimo Stilton has done so well in the U.S. that Italy ran out of books and now Papercutz creates them.

Original graphic novels were an organic movement from the Geronimo Stilton books and Papercutz’s first original title was Deb Lucke’s THE LUNCH WITCH, followed by THE RED SHOES AND OTHER STORIES by Sandra Marrs and John Chalmers who create comics under the name Metaphrog. This November the house is publishing TRISH TRASH: Rollergirl of Mars, a YA SF graphic novel offering diversity—the book has a multiracial heroine—that was originally published in France but created by noted American cartoonist Jessica Abel.

The initial Charmz line (S’17) will simultaneously release the first four graphic novels in a planned series:
* CHLOE by Greg Tessier and Amandine, the story of a girl who is navigating life at a new school
* STITCHED by Mariah Huehner and Aaron Alexovich, a supernatural tale about a rag-doll girl who wakes up in a cemetery and must figure out who she is
* SWEETIES, based on Cathy Cassidy’s Chocolate Box Girls novels and adapted by Veronique Grisseaux and Anna Merli, about a girl who acquires four half-sisters when her father remarries
* THE GREAT COSMIC RACE by Amy Chu and Agnes Garbowska, a SF adventure story featuring an interstellar scavenger hunt, a smart girl, and an alien shapeshifter

Meanwhile, Library Journal offered their Graphic Novels Preview 2016 and noted many trends, starting with…
FEMALE CREATORS

Women writers and artists have historically been under­represented in graphic novels, but that seems poised to change based on the number of high-profile titles set for release in the coming year, ranging from humor to journalism to memoir and beyond. Among the most highly anticipated is Lynda Barry’s THE GREATEST OF MARLYS (Drawn & Quarterly, Aug.), a collection concentrating on one of best-selling Barry’s most beloved characters, eight-year-old Marlys. Through Marlys, Barry delves into the highs and lows of childhood and adolescence, capturing in unflinching detail the amusement and the horror of coming of age.

Lisa Hanawalt, perhaps best known as the designer behind the distinctive look of the animated Netflix series BoJack Horseman, moves fluidly between wit and pathos in HOT DOG TASTE TEST (Drawn & Quarterly, Jun.). While Hanawalt explores (and explodes) foodie culture in this new book, she also investigates relationships, identity issues, and more, all delivered in beautiful watercolors and an original and immensely funny voice.

Slightly less provocative but no less interesting an exploration of one artist’s quest for self-expression is Lucy Knisley’s memoir SOMETHING NEW: Tales from a Makeshift Bride (First Second, May), which details Knisley’s ventures in putting her own stamp on every facet of her wedding, from sewing her own dress to building the very barn in which the ceremony was held.

JOURNALISM AND NONFICTION

Riad Sattouf’s THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE, VOL. 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984–1985 (Holt, Sept.), the sequel to THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1978–1984, continues the author’s experiences moving among France, Libya, and Syria as a child. The second book finds the Sattoufs settled in Syria and struggling against obstacles both local and political.

Also exploring the Middle East, specifically the legacy of the Iraq War, is Sarah Glidden’s ROLLING BLACKOUTS (Drawn & Quarterly, Oct.), in which the author describes her travels as a journalist in Turkey, Iraq, and Syria.

FROM ABROAD

Graphic novels in translation continue to be massively popular, especially those originally published in Japanese. While the late Shigeru Mizuki is not the legend that [Osamu] Tezuka is, he is an important figure in his own right, and fans should be excited about Drawn & Quarterly’s THE BIRTH OF KITARO (May), the first of six volumes that will bring the Kitaro character to the United States for the first time. readmoreremove

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