Articles tagged "starred reviews"

Sneak Peek: September 2017 Indie Next List

The September 2017 Indie Next list includes 1 Macmillan title!

The Resurrection of Joan Ashby by Cherise Wolas

“This breathtaking…novel will do for motherhood what Gone Girl did for marriage. ‘A story requires two things: a great story to tell and the bravery to tell it,’ Joan observes. Wolas’ debut expertly checks off both boxes.”—Booklist, starred review

“Like John Irving’s The World According to Garp, this is a look at the life of a writer that will entertain many nonwriters. Like Lauren Groff’s Fates and Furies, it’s a sharp-eyed portrait of the artist as spouse and householder. From the start, one wonders how Wolas is possibly going to pay off the idea that her heroine is such a genius. Verdict: few could do better.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

 

#bookbday (08/01/17)

Happy #bookbday to:

The Bedlam Stacks by Natasha Pulley

An August 2017 Indie Next Selection!

“The imagination [Pulley] showed in her impressive debut was no fluke…Pulley understands her genre–swashbuckling costume fantasy–but she deals in surprises, not clichés…[A] meditation on love, trust, and the passage of time.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Fans of The Watchmaker of Filigree Street (who will be pleased that a character from that novel makes a cameo appearance) know that Pulley has a way with damaged characters who are looking for a new purpose in life. While there are steampunk elements, including clockwork lamps, there’s also a subtle inexplicable magic running throughout the unusual, remote setting.”–Library Journal

Gravel Heart by Abdulrazak Gurnah

“Short-listed for the Booker, Whitbread, Commonwealth, and Los Angeles Times Book prizes, Zanzibar-born, U.K.-based Gurnah here chronicles the life of a boy named Salim born after Zanzibar’s fight for independence and subsequent bloody revolution. Salim’s father is indifferent to him, eventually moving out of the house, and as his mother keeps company with a strange man, Salim draws close to his beloved diplomat uncle Amir. Amir offers the teenage Salim a chance to travel to London, which he finds a cold, crowded place, but there he wrestles with coming-of-age issues even as he faces his family’s dark secret.”–LJ, Pre-Pub Alert

One Summer Day in Rome by Mark Lamprell

“For romance fans of all ages with special appeal to those who devour the Italian romances of Elizabeth Adler.”–Library Journal

Safe by Ryan Gattis

“Gattis, who has written YA and adult fiction about teens, here delivers a gritty L.A. crime novel about two men seeking redemption. The criminal life is carefully rendered, the stakes are clear, and the characters’ humanity is rich and refreshing. …this is an emotionally rich page-turner whose devastating ending still offers a glimmer of hope.” — Booklist, starred review

The Grip of It by Jac Jemc

“The latest from Jemc is a haunted house tale that toys with the hallmarks of ghost stories—a young city couple moving to a small town, a curmudgeonly neighbor, a spooky legend—to create an exhilarating and unsettling literary page-turner.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A psychological spook story in the best high literary tradition…Shivery and smart. A book that brings the legacy of Henry James into the modern world with great effect.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“For connoisseurs of the “new weird” and literary/psychological horror à la Mark Z. ­Danielewski’s House of Leaves and ­Marisha Pessl’s Night Film.”–Library Journal, starred review

Beast by Paul Kingsnorth

An August 2017 Indie Next Selection!

“A tour de force, reminiscent of the best of John Fowles and David Mitchell.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

Dragonsworn by Sherrilyn Kenyon

“In this second book in the “Dragons Rising” trilogy, set in the Dark-Hunters universe that has pushed Kenyon to the top of the New York Times best sellers list many, many times, the dragon Falcyn hates Greeks for having destroyed all that he loved. Now the god Apollo is sending an army of demons to destroy the people of his granddaughter, Medea, who is not content to sit back idly. Testy Falcyn has a weapon that could save them all. With a one-day laydown on August 1.”–LJ, Pre-Pub Alert

Class Mom by Laurie Gelman

A clever debut novel about a year in the life of a kindergarten class mom—a brilliant send-up of the petty and surprisingly cutthroat terrain of parent politics. “Gelman pens an uproariously funny first novel with a relatable protagonist. Moms will clamor for this story, trying to hold back tears of laughter as Jen establishes her voice and place as the class mom.” — Library Journal, starred review

#thrillerthursday (7/27/17)

It’s #thrillerthursday and we’re reading:

A Thousand Cuts by Thomas Mogford

“Richly atmospheric… Throughout the series, Mogford has explored the multicultural tensions that define contemporary Gibraltar, and this time he ups the ante by adding a fascinating historical layer to that ambiguity-drenched cultural stew. Sanguinetti, naturally, feels caught in the middle as the riptide of present and past threaten to engulf him and those he loves. An essential international crime series.”–Booklist

LoveMurder by Saul Black

“A high-grade thriller strong on character, police procedure, and page-flipping tension.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

Paradise Valley by C.J. Box

“The intrepid, appealing Cassie relies on her keen investigative instincts to hone in on Pergram in this top-notch thriller, which makes vivid use of the American West.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

Let the Dead Speak by Jane Casey

“These character-driven Kerrigan mysteries are among the genre’s finest, and the last page here is likely to leave readers breathless and longing for Casey’s next.”–Booklist, starred review

“Compelling… The intricate plot unfolds naturally, as Casey never lets readers stray from Kerrigan’s point of view, so that they feel as if they are figuring it all out with her in this increasingly dark and tragic story.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

Penance of the Damned by Peter Tremayne

“Those who enjoy a rich historical setting, wish to learn more about ancient Ireland, and relish a perplexing puzzle will be well rewarded.”–Library Journal

Three Stars for Jac Jemc’s THE GRIP OF IT

Jac Jemc’s chilling literary horror novel THE GRIP OF IT has Publishers Weekly, Kirkus Reviews and Library Journal celebrating…

“The latest from Jemc is a haunted house tale that toys with the hallmarks of ghost stories—a young city couple moving to a small town, a curmudgeonly neighbor, a spooky legend—to create an exhilarating and unsettling literary page-turner.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A psychological spook story in the best high literary tradition…Shivery and smart. A book that brings the legacy of Henry James into the modern world with great effect.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“For connoisseurs of the “new weird” and literary/psychological horror à la Mark Z. ­Danielewski’s House of Leaves and ­Marisha Pessl’s Night Film.”–Library Journal, starred review

#fridayreads (07/07/17)

Today’s #fridayreads are all debuts!

South Pole Station by Ashley Shelby

A July Indie Next List Selection!

“Shelby’s first novel, based on a short story that won the Third Coast Fiction Prize, skillfully weaves science, climate change, politics, sociology, and art. Competing ideas about the origins of the universe are wrapped in the vagaries of human nature and the dangers of climate extremes. Her characters are a quirky subset of humanity. VERDICT All readers of fiction, particularly those interested in life in extreme climates, will find this appealing.”–Library Journal (starred review)

“Readers will find characters to love, suspect, and identify with among Cooper’s fellow Polies and won’t forget them easily. A good match for readers whose interest in Antarctica was sparked by Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette? (2014), those who enjoy stories about quirky individuals and made families, and extreme armchair travelers.”–Booklist

“This is a fascinating novel, loaded with interesting history of Antarctic exploration, current scientific operations, and the living and working conditions of those folks brave enough to endure six months of darkness and six months of daylight.”–Publishers Weekly

Tornado Weather by Deborah E. Kennedy

“Kennedy’s moving debut novel, about people living in small-town Indiana, reads like interconnected short stories as each chapter is told from a different character’s perspective…Kennedy has painted a distinctive picture of a Midwestern blue-collar town that will remind readers of Richard Russo’s work. Fans of Did You Ever Have a Family (2015), by Bill Clegg, will also find much to admire.”–Booklist

“Kennedy’s heartbreaking debut novel captures the warped and isolated landscape of today’s American Midwest… Though this story is hung on a child gone missing and a tornado on the horizon, the focus is the flawed folks who people it. The author is a fine mimic, inhabiting her characters in such a way that we know them from the inside out. The denouement, coming as it does from a surreal, bird’s-eye view, is very strange indeed. Kennedy’s superb chorus leaves an indelible impression.”–Publishers Weekly

We Shall Not Sleep by Estep Nagy

“An unusual and compelling debut…a surprising delight. Nagy mixes narrative modes and tones (and generations) nimbly; it’s rare to see suspense and literary lyricism woven together so well.”–Kirkus Reviews

“Nagy neatly juggles his many characters, allowing suspense to develop naturally and working in thought-provoking variations on the themes of betrayal and survival.”–Booklist

Stars for the Women Who Flew for Hitler

Both Library Journal and Booklist love Biographers’ Club Prize-winner Clare Mulley’s THE WOMEN WHO FLEW FOR HITLER—a dual biography of Nazi Germany’s most highly decorated women pilots!

THE WOMEN WHO FLEW FOR HITLER: A True Story of Soaring Ambition and Searing Rivalry by Clare Mulley

 
“Biographer Mulley comes through in a major way with this deep dive into the lives of WWII–era German aviatrixes Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg…Absolutely gripping, Mulley’s double portrait is a reminder that there are many more stories to tell from this oft-examined time.” — Booklist, starred review

 

“This compelling work has the drama and suspense of the best movie scripts. It is the perfect choice for lovers of narrative non-fiction, especially those interested in strong females.” — Library Journal, starred review

June 2017 Fantasy

Looking for a summer escape? Dive into one of these new fantasy titles:

DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES by Seanan McGuire
A June 2017 LibraryReads pick with three starred reviews! The second urban fantasy book in the Wayward Children series, following EVERY HEART A DOORWAY, explores what happened to Jack and Jill before they tumbled into Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children. “McGuire’s exquisitely written fairy tale is about the choices that can alter the course of a life forever, lost innocence, and what it is to love and be loved.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

A GATHERING OF RAVENS by Scott Oden
Beowulf meets The Lord of the Rings in this epic novel of vengeance, faith, and the power of myth. “In this lovingly crafted tale of high adventure, Oden creates an alternate early medieval Europe in which mortal men have defeated entire races of vicious magical creatures. He provides a satisfying saga that’s as complex as an old tree’s roots, and a pleasure to read.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (6/27/17 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to two new family-based novels with starred reviews!

THE SUPREMES SING THE HAPPY HEARTACHE BLUES by Edward Kelsey Moore
From the author of the bestselling THE SUPREMES AT EARL’S ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT, an exuberant and poignant new novel of passions, family, and forgiveness. “Moore’s bluesy, breezy novel takes readers through life’s highs and lows and in-between times when no one knows what is coming next; its air of folksy optimism should appeal to fans of Alexander McCall Smith and Fredrik Backman.” — Library Journal, starred review

“Delightful… His characters, both living and dead, come together to make a wonderful whole.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE OUTER CAPE by Patrick Dacey
A piercing and compassionate debut novel about how the new generations atone for the sins of the old in small-town America. “Beautifully written, with strong, deeply memorable characters, this is a powerful story of possibility and promise.” — Booklist, starred review

Thriller Thursday (6/15/17 Edition)

Summer’s heating up with these new mysteries:

THE FORGOTTEN GIRL by Rio Youers
Two starred reviews! “Canadian author Youers makes his U.S. debut with a paranormal thriller distinguished by subtle characterizations and emotionally evocative prose. Harvey’s compelling, moving search for Sally and the truth offers everything that fans of intelligent suspense could wish for.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE LAST PLACE YOU LOOK by Kristen Lepionka
Two starred reviews! Kinsey Millhone meets Serial in this debut about an allegedly closed case and a tenacious, troubled private investigator who doesn’t know when to quit. “This is a remarkably accomplished debut mystery, with sensitive character development and a heart-stopping denouement. Let’s hope there are more Roxane Weary novels on the way.” — Booklist, starred review

KNIFE CREEK by Paul Doiron
In this new edge-of-your-seat thriller from Edgar finalist and LibraryReads author Paul Doiron, Mike Bowditch delves into a long buried investigation to uncover a dangerous secret. “This solid eighth entry in the Mike Bowditch series, following WIDOWMAKER, is full of strong characters, great dialogue, and Doiron’s signature command of the rugged and natural Maine setting.” — Booklist

THE MENTOR by Lee Matthew Goldberg
Cape Fear meets Wonder Boys in this story of a book editor and his mentor as past secrets and a depraved manuscript dangerously entangle their lives. “Goldberg’s novel is…gripping. Like the Bret Easton Ellis novel it resembles, it succeeds as sharp and bitter satire—in this case, of the publishing industry and the sensationalism and barbarity that consumers crave.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

June 2017 Nonfiction Stars

Check out these *stellar* nonfiction titles joining your library shelves soon:

JANE AUSTEN AT HOME: A Biography by Lucy Worsley
“Worsley gives sharply drawn pictures of domesticity in the many homes that Austen inhabited, including her family’s rented houses in Bath and residences where she, her widowed mother, and sister visited as guests before they settled in Chawton, a site of pilgrimage for Janeites. A charming, well-researched journey to ‘Austen-land.’” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Her book is a lovely excavation of Austen’s home life, in which she provides readers access into places such as Pemberley without ever giving too much of herself away. This volume is sure to delight Austen fans, while Worsley’s examination of manuscripts will make new material accessible to scholars unable to visit the British Library, Hampshire Archives, Kent History and Library Centre, or the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Record Office.” Library Journal, starred review

THE ART OF DEATH: Writing the Final Story by Edwidge Danticat
“From ‘The Art of’ series, this emotional, brave work interrogates and bears witness to the ultimate unknown. Will appeal to readers looking for warmth and insight—whatever their personal circumstance.” — Library Journal, starred review

“National Book Critics Circle Award winner Danticat…takes on an unpleasant topic with sensitivity and passion.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

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