Articles tagged "St. Martin’s"

LJ Mystery Spotlight Cover Girl: Zoje Stage

We’re thrilled to see Zoje Stage gracing the cover of the April 15, 2018 issue of Library Journal!

The BABY TEETH author did an extensive Q&A with LJ (shout-out to Talia “the terror” Sherer‘s PLA book buzz to a crowd of 1,000 librarians, which made BABY TEETH the most requested giveaway ARC in our booth!), and it was included with seven other Macmillan mysteries in a genre spotlight:

Hector DeJean, associate publicity director of St. Martin’s Minotaur Books imprint, says, “Thrillers focusing on family, marriage, and other domestic relationships have proven wildly popular, and in forthcoming books by Jennifer Hillier and Sandie Jones these intimate connections of family and friendship—beyond married couples—turn deadly.” In JAR OF HEARTS (Jun.), Hillier delves into the story of a woman who survived a relationship with a dangerous boyfriend and kept secrets about her best friend’s murder, while Jones, in her debut, THE OTHER WOMAN (Aug.), focuses on a woman facing an increasingly manipulative mother-in-law.

Anxieties about motherhood and the parent-child relationship are driving other domestic thrillers. Coming in July from St. Martin’s is Zoje Stage’s chilling debut, BABY TEETH, in which silent and emotionally detached seven-year-old Hanna conspires to kill her mother. St. Martin’s executive editor Jennifer Weis devoured the book in one sitting. “I couldn’t look away as it exposed family truths, a child’s threat to her parents’ relationship, and a continuous feeling of impending doom with dire consequences. WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN meets GONE GIRL meets THE OMEN—it hits all the right notes.” readmoreremove

LJ Spring 2018 Editors’ Picks

Library Journal‘s editors revealed their Spring 2018 picks, including these five titles:

Kate DiGirolomo, SELF-e Community Coordinator
I’d like to don my metaphorical hipster glasses for a second to proclaim that I knew about L. Penelope’s SONG OF BLOOD & STONE (St. Martin’s, May) before she got the book deal. Her captivating “Earthsinger” series was part of LJ’s SELF-e program, featured among the best fiction the indie world has to offer. In this first installment, magical outcast Jasminda and spy Jack embark on a journey, unexpectedly finding love while trying to save their world from invasion. We’ll certainly miss this one in SELF-e land, but it’ll be exciting to see it reach new audiences—and deservedly so!

Rounding out my novel choices is Shobha Rao’s GIRLS BURN BRIGHTER (Flatiron: Macmillan, Mar.; LJ 1/18). It first caught my attention with its incredible title and then kept it with the two honest, admirable heroines Rao has created. Poornima and Savitha, young women who can see beyond the constraints of their Indian village, will ignite a spark of hope in readers.

Liz French, Senior Editor
And then there’s Weegee, aka Arthur Fellig (1899–1968), the outsize personality and street photographer who prowled the alleys of midcentury Gotham, often scooping the cops at crime scenes and documenting nightlife. New York magazine senior editor Christopher Bonanos tells his story in FLASH: The Making of Weegee the Famous (Holt, Mar.). Thirty of his photographs enhance the work.

Stephanie Sendaula, Associate Editor
Another fascinating book in the same vein is Bryan Mealer’s THE KINGS OF BIG SPRING: God, Oil, and One Family’s Search for the American Dream (Flatiron: Macmillan, Feb.; LJ 2/1/18). After telling myself that I would only read a few pages, I read the entire book in one sitting, engrossed by the fortunes and misfortunes of patriarch John Lewis Mealer and his children and grandchildren, from Georgia to Texas, California to Arizona. Bryan, his grandson, interviews numerous relatives to create a history–turned–collective biography about what it costs personally, professionally, and spiritually to pursue the American Dream. readmoreremove

All’s Fair in Love – LJ Genre Spotlight on Romance

Love is in the air at Library Journal! Their recent genre spotlight on romance includes these steamy Macmillan reads:
HISTORY OR HER STORY?

Kerrigan Byrne’s THE DUKE (St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), the fourth installment in her “Victorian Rebels” series, features a nurse by day/spy by night who gets tangled up with a duke who has lost a hand as a prisoner of war.

PLAYTIME

Addison Fox’s AT LAST (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Nov.) stars a former NFL hero who walks away from the pros and clashes with a Brooklyn brewery owner.

While the traditional games will continue to thrive, the genre is broadening to include new and ever more exciting sports. Consider Rebecca Yarros’s WILDER (Entangled, Sept.), which features a five-time X Games (extreme sports) champion.

MORE THAN BRAWN

Romantic suspense is also getting tech-savvy with a heroine computer hacker in Sarah Castille’s new “Ruin & Revenge” series, which begins with NICO (St. Martin’s, Dec.).

Even our favorite professionals, librarians, are coming out in force with Dawn Ryder’s suspenseful DEEP INTO TROUBLE (St. Martins, Mar. 2017). This third title in her “Unbroken Heroes” series matches up a library worker with a special agent.

LOVE FROM ANOTHER WORLD

Romance writers have taken on the epic fantasy and sf tales with crossovers that transcend genre boundaries. Jacqueline Carey is no stranger to epic fantasy that also delights romance readers with strongly sensual, erotic plots, such as her “­Kushiel’s Legacy Trilogies.” Carey here retells Shakespeare’s The Tempest in a tale of forbidden love, MIRANDA AND CALIBAN (Tor, Feb. 2017).

For sf romance lovers, marriage and divorce give way to seven-year contracts in Erin Lyon’s I LOVE YOU SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Forge, Jan. 2017).

Paranormal romance interest remains strong. Cathy Clamp’s second “Luna Lake” title, ILLICIT (Tor, Nov.), features shifters from dueling bear clans.

HIT AND MYTH

Fairy tale and myth retellings are also keeping paranormal romance in view. Monique Patterson, executive editor and editorial director of romance for St. Martin’s Press, thinks that “retellings never waned in romance and have been happening across all the romance subgenres.” The press is releasing Kerrelyn Sparks’s new “Embraced” series, which opens with a reimagining of Beauty and the Beast, HOW TO TAME A BEAST IN SEVEN DAYS (Mar. 2017).

Christine Warren proves that animals are not the only shifters around with HARD TO HANDLE (St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), the fifth entry in her “Gargoyles” series.

In debut author Madhuri Pavamani’s new dark and erotic “The Keeper” series, an assassin must kill a target that has nine lives. The series begins with DUTCH (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), quickly followed by JUMA (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Mar. 2017).

A DIVERSE UNIVERSE

All readers deserve books that represent their individuality. For years, many publishers have developed imprints dedicated to multicultural fiction, others to ­LGBTQ+ works, while still others increasingly offer a broader selection of materials, whether related to ethnicity, sexual orientation, abilities, age, or body type. Diverse titles we’ve seen are predominantly from African American authors (and feature African American characters).

Tracy Brown’s BOSS (Griffin: St. Martin’s, Jan. 2017), a contemporary reimagining of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, has been likened to the immensely popular TV shows Empire and Scandal. readmoreremove

LJ Editors’ Fall Picks 2016

Library Journal editors recently revealed their Fall 2016 picks, including these three Macmillan titles:

Mad Men fans meet Lillian Boxfish, once the highest paid female advertising copywriter in America. When Kathleen Rooney’s novel LILLIAN BOXFISH TAKES A WALK (St. Martin’s, Jan. 2017) opens, it’s New Year’s Eve in 1984 Manhattan, and 85-year-old Lillian is preparing to leave her Murray Hill apartment to go to dinner at Grimaldi’s, her favorite Italian restaurant. Along the way, she takes a detour down memory lane, reflecting on her life and walking through the streets of the city. Rooney says her novel was inspired by the life of advertising pioneer Margaret Fishback, who made her reputation in the 1930s working for Macy’s.” — Wilda Williams readmoreremove

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