Articles tagged "Sabaa Tahir"

Stars for MIRAGE

We’re thrilled that Somaiya Daud’s YA sci-fi/fantasy debut, MIRAGE,  has received two starred reviews!

Readers are thrown right into this incredibly built world with fully developed cultures and characters. Daud expertly uses a sci-fi setting to explore issues within our own society, particularly the effects of colonization on both individuals and cultures as a whole. This poetically written novel will appeal to many, particularly fans of CINDER by Marissa Meyer and AN EMBER IN THE ASHES by Sabaa Tahir.” School Library Journal, starred review

“Daud’s gorgeously written novel features lush and poetic language that brings the setting into vivid color. In addition to the blend of [science fiction] and fantasy, Daud supplies a dash of forbidden romance destined to leave the reader gasping for breath . . . With an ending that is gut wrenching yet still hopeful, this immersive, captivating series starter is sure to have fans eager for the sequel.” Booklist, starred review

MIRAGE will be available August 28 from Flatiron Books and Macmillan Young Listeners. readmoreremove

Day’s YA – MIRAGE

Hello, YA librarians!

Whew! We’re back from ALA Annual and, with that, our 2018 conference season comes to a close! The past few months have been such a fun and wild ride, and we certainly ended on a high note.

Speaking of ALA, some of you may have picked up this magical YA debut. If you were one of the lucky ones who got a copy, you’re going to want to put it at the top of your pile.

MIRAGE by Somaiya Daud
9781250126429
Available August 28, 2018 from Flatiron Books and Macmillan Young Listeners
Ages 13 to 18

Amani lives “on a small moon orbiting a large planet, in a small farmhouse in a small village” with her family. Their moon, Cadiz, is part of Mizaal Galaxy and is ruled by the Vathek Empire’s cruel king, Mathis, and his daughter, Princess Maram.

On Amani’s Majority Night—the night she is to become an adult in the eyes of her village and celebrate her coming-of-age—she is kidnapped by Vathek guards and forced to become Princess Maram’s body double. The one bright spot in Amani’s bleak situation is Idris, Maram’s fiancé (who’d mistaken Amani for Maram the first time they met). As Amani perfects her role as Maram and draws closer to Idris, she discovers the rebellion and an opportunity to use her position in an unexpected way. readmoreremove

Day’s YA – HOW I RESIST

Happy New Year, YA friends!

Winter Storm Grayson is in full force over here in NYC, so we’re staying bundled up today. The temperatures outside might be arctic-like, but I have a book for you that’s sure to light a fire of resistance in the hearts of readers young and old.

HOW I RESIST by Maureen Johnson
9781250168368
Available May 15, 2018 from Wednesday Books
Ages 13 to 18

Young people are rising up among the ranks of activists and it is absolutely vital that their voices are heard. This book will help to make sure that happens. HOW I RESIST is a compilation of essays, interviews, poems, and songs written for teens about activism, strength, and having hope in a time when the world looks bleak. Chapters include an essay about growing up queer and Hispanic in Texas, a guide to calling your representatives, a short story about being an activist while at college, and a list of books about resistance compiled by librarians, plus a number of other thoughtful and thought-provoking topics. The all-star cast of contributors includes Libba Bray, Javier Muñoz, Rosie O’Donnell, Jodi Picoult, Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, Jesse Tyler Ferguson and his husband Justin Mikita, Sabaa Tahir, and so many more.

While this collection is written specifically for young people, it will make readers of all ages pause and think about what they are doing–or what they could be doing–to make the world a better place, which ultimately has an impact on resistance, as Hebh Jamal points out: “Taking time to think deeply about one’s advocacy makes a more productive advocate. How I resist is therefore deeply affected by how much I am willing to think.” The message of hope within these pages is one that all readers can and should turn to for inspiration and encouragement. In the end, it’s about being true to who you are and believing that you have the power to make a change because, as Rebecca Roanhorse says in her chapter of the book, “Being you is the most powerful kind of resistance of all.” readmoreremove

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