Articles tagged "New York"

Nonfiction Round-Up (10/23/19)

Essays that’ll make you laugh out loud, a beautiful friendship between Carly Simon and Jackie O, the best questions received by librarians, and the buildings that have transformed New York…check it all out in today’s nonfiction round-up.

DO YOU MIND IF I CANCEL?: Things That Still Annoy Me by Gary Janetti

“A TV veteran’s memories of coming-of-age—and coming out of the closet—as an aspiring writer and actor in New York.”–Kirkus Reviews

TOUCHED BY THE SUN: My Friendship with Jackie by Carly Simon

“A behind-the-scenes glimpse at parties where the famous mingle with the famous.”–Kirkus Reviews

PECULIAR QUESTIONS AND PRACTICAL ANSWERS: A Little Book of Whimsy and Wisdom from the Files of the New York Public Library by the New York Public Library

The oddest, funniest, and most whimsical questions that the NYPL staff has received paired with hilariously illustrated depictions to set the scene.

A HISTORY OF NEW YORK IN 27 BUILDINGS: The 400-Year Untold Story of an American Metropolis by Sam Roberts

“Roberts’s wide-ranging historical research and storytelling skills should captivate New Yorkers and others. Larger photographs might have enhanced readers’ connection to these structures and their roles in the life of the city.”–Library Journal

Thriller Thursday (9/26/19)

Joe Gunther returns + international terrorism + 19th century New York in shambles = today’s #ThrillerThursday.

BOMBER’S MOON: A Joe Gunther Novel by Archer Mayor

“[F]ans will appreciate the introduction of FARO into a mix of technological tools, which, together with Gunther’s crime-solving prowess, make for an absorbing read.”–Booklist, starred review

BLOOD IN THE WATER by Jack Flynn

“Dirty fighting, clever strategizing, and complicated romances drive this story at breakneck pace.”–Library Journal

HUDSON’S KILL: A Justice Flanagan Thriller by Paddy Hirsch

“Hirsch makes the most of his setting and has a rich vein of potential future plots to mine. Historical mystery fans will be enthralled.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

Happy #PubDay (9/17/19)

Explore one woman’s life inside Brooklyn’s Chasidic community + embark on an epic Chinese kung fu adventure in today’s #PubDay celebration!

ON DIVISION by Goldie Goldbloom

“Goldbloom, who is Chasidic and a mother of eight, vitally portrays the complex dynamics and paradoxes of a strictly regimented, unforgiving, yet loving religious enclave, and imaginatively and boldly explores the divide between tradition and compassion, community and self.”–Booklist

A HERO BORN by Jin Yong

“Newly translated into English, the ‘Legends of the Condor Heroes’ series is an epic, fantastical tale filled with betrayal, brotherhood, and kung fu energy. The first in the series shows the depth of Jin Yong’s writing, and the sobriquet of ‘China’s Tolkien’ is well deserved.”–Library Journal, starred review

Subway Success Story: THE RACE UNDERGROUND

“The blizzard of 1888 was the trigger that cities needed to finally acknowledge that the horse-pulled carriages, the steam-powered elevated trains, the cable-pulled trolleys and even the electrified street railways all suffered from the same flaw that could no longer be ignored. They were at the mercy of the skies.”
– THE RACE UNDERGROUND


Forget Chris Christie's bridge saga–we've got an even better true life story about a rivalry between cities and brothers that resulted in an invention that changed the lives of millions: THE RACE UNDERGROUND by Doug Most.

When the great blizzard of 1888 brought New York City to a halt, citizens realized a new transportation solution had to be found. Enter two brothers–Henry Melville Whitney of Boston and William Collins Whitney of New York City. Each man shared the same dream: that their city would be the first to have a subway system. And with that, the great race was on!

This riveting story is a Junior Library Guild selection, making it a great choice for younger readers interested in transportation history. It's also a great recommendation for adult readers who enjoy Erik Larson and David McCullough.

“Mr. Most weaves together the egos, political hurdles and other daunting challenges…in a sweeping narrative of late-19th-century intrigue.” – Sam Roberts, The New York Times

"An almost flawlessly conducted tour back to a time when major American cities dreamed big." – Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"...A remarkably well-told story filled with villains, heroes, and events of the Gilded Age...." – Library Journal

"[Most] delivers a fun and enjoyable read about a vital, transformative period.” – Publishers Weekly

“This book proves again that American history is a treasure trove of great stories, this one filled with drama, sacrifice, loss and unimaginable success.” — Ken Burns, filmmaker, creator of the PBS series "The Civil War"

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