Articles tagged "Mariko Koike"

Happy Halloween 2016!

halloween2016-editHappy Halloween! Talia “Terror Cat” Sherer and “Anna Banana” share their spooky reads to celebrate the day:

THE MOTION OF PUPPETS by Keith Donohue
An October 2016 LibraryReads pick! This new horror novel from the bestselling author of the LibraryReads pick THE BOY WHO DREW MONSTERS (which has been optioned for film) is a chilling tale of romance and enchantment set in a Québec toy shop, patterned after the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. “Intricately plotted, absorbing, and suspenseful, this is a moving, modern story set in what feels like a fairy-tale world but is actually terrifyingly realistic.” — Booklist, starred review

SHIRLEY JACKSON’S “THE LOTTERY”: The Authorized Graphic Adaptation by Miles Hyman
Available simultaneously in trade paperback
Two starred reviews! Published in time for Jackson’s centennial, this graphic adaptation masterfully reimagines her iconic story with a striking visual narrative created by her grandson, Miles Hyman. “A stunning graphic adaptation of a chilling classic.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

THE FAMILY PLOT by Cherie Priest
“In Priest’s gothic haunted-house story, workers at failing architectural salvage company are given a once-in-a-lifetime chance to reverse their fortunes, if they can survive the ghosts plaguing the property. Priest spices up a standard haunting with an irresistible premise focused on the “hidden treasure” aspect of salvage work. Highly recommended for fans of contemporary ghost stories.” — Booklist, starred review

THE GRAVEYARD APARTMENT by Mariko Koike
A terrifying tale of a young family who moves into an apartment building next to a graveyard, and the horrors that are unleashed upon them. “The haunting itself is well done and scary. The atmosphere and anticipation build perfectly to create an apartment building one would be quite hesitant to live in. Fans of classic ghost stories, such as THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, will appreciate the subtle chills.” — Booklist readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (10/13/16 Edition)

Terror and thrills lurk behind the pages of these #ThrillerThursday picks:

A MOST NOVEL REVENGE by Ashley Weaver
In librarian Weaver’s third entry in the LibraryReads/Edgar-nominated charming mystery series set in 1930s England, Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside. “Fascinating and stylish characters fill out a finely tuned traditional mystery.”
Publishers Weekly

THE GRAVEYARD APARTMENT by Mariko Koike
A terrifying tale of a young family who moves into an apartment building next to a graveyard, and the horrors that are unleashed upon them. “The haunting itself is well done and scary. The atmosphere and anticipation build perfectly to create an apartment building one would be quite hesitant to live in. Fans of classic ghost stories, such as THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, will appreciate the subtle chills.” — Booklist readmoreremove

LJ Genre Spotlight: SF/Fantasy

Library Journal‘s genre spotlight on SF/Fantasy has so much Macmillan goodness, it’s out of this world!

A MULTIPLICITY OF CHARACTERS

September marks the publication of James Tiptree Jr. Literary Award–winning short story writer Nisi Shawl’s highly anticipated first novel, EVERFAIR, a steampunk alternate history set in the Belgian Congo. “It’s as diverse in about as many ways as you can count. The author is a queer black woman, and several of [her] characters are queer (and often women and/or nonwhite as well),” explains Tor Books editor Liz Gorinsky. “The [other] characters represent a multiplicity of voices that have been historically silenced—Africans, East Asians, and African Americans—as well as a few Europeans, in complex relationships with one another.”

WORKS IN TRANSLATION

Increasingly, publishers’ fall lists are featuring speculative fiction in translation, and awards committees have taken note. In 2015, Cixin Liu’s THE THREE-BODY PROBLEM became the first translated sf novel to win a Hugo Award and wound up on the reading lists of President Barack Obama and Mark Zuckerberg. Arriving in September from Tor is DEATH’S END, the highly anticipated conclusion to Liu’s “Remembrance of Earth’s Past” trilogy.

“I have somehow fallen into the Chinese [sf] publishing business, and I couldn’t be happier,” exclaims Tor’s Gorinsky. “This fall we actually have two books translated by Ken Liu (who’s an amazing author in his own right—the only one to ever win Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy awards for the same story).” The second title is INVISIBLE PLANETS, an anthology of Chinese short stories; it includes two tales by Cixin Liu and the rest by rising talents, including the Hugo- and Sturgeon Award–nominated “Folding Beijing” by Hao Jingfang. Coming in October is Mariko Koike’s THE GRAVEYARD APARTMENT; known for her hybrid works that mix detective fiction with horror, the author is one of Japan’s most popular writers. Originally published in 1986, this novel follows a young family as they move into what they believe is the perfect home—despite the cemetery next door.

DRAWN FROM OTHER LANDS

Pseudonymous author Lian Hearn, who has lived in Japan and is a student of the Japanese language, explores that country’s medieval history and mythology in her four-volume “Tale of Shikanoko” series. In the third outing, LORD OF THE DARKWOOD, the warrior Shikanoko must confront the Spider Tribe that he had some part in creating.

Authors are also incorporating some unusual urban settings in the natural world for their epics. Australian Thoraiya Dyer’s series opener, CROSSROADS OF CANOPY, due from Tor in January, introduces a city set in the canopy of a rainforest ruled by gods. Unar, the young servant of the goddess Audblayin, must descend to the deprived realms of Understorey and Floor to seek her destiny. Fran Wilde introduced readers to her towering city of living bone and its flying inhabitants in her award-winning debut UPDRAFT, but more trouble brews for residents in CLOUDBOUND. readmoreremove

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