Articles tagged "Long Walk to Freedom"

Monday Funday With New Nonfiction

Memoirs, feminism, espionage, comedians, dogs—these new nonfiction books available this month have something for every reader:

ADMISSIONS: Life as a Brain Surgeon by Henry Marsh
“Like DO NO HARM, Marsh’s previous memoir, ADMISSIONS is ‘wandering and ruminative, an overland trek through the doctor’s anxieties and private shames,’ our critic Jennifer Senior writes. Marsh once again recounts his miscalculations and surgical catastrophes; rails against the constraints of an increasingly depersonalized British health care system; and describes his operating theater in all of its Grand Guignol splendor.”New York Times Book Review (10 New Books We Recommend This Week, 10/12/17)

WAITING FOR THE PUNCH: Words to Live by from the WTF Podcast by Marc Maron, foreword by John Oliver
From the beloved and wildly popular podcast WTF with Marc Maron comes a collection of intimate, hilarious and life changing conversations with some of the biggest names in entertainment. “From a book by a comedian, filled with the words of other comedians, readers will expect some laughs. What they might not expect are heartfelt revelations, life lessons, and perhaps even a cry or two.” — Booklist

DARE NOT LINGER: The Presidential Years by Nelson Mandela & Mandla Langa, prologue by Graça Machel
The long-awaited second volume of Nelson Mandela’s memoirs, left unfinished at his death and never before available, are here completed and expanded with notes and speeches written by Mandela during his historic presidency, making for a moving sequel to his worldwide bestseller LONG WALK TO FREEDOM. “The title comes from Mandela himself, who noted, ‘With freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not ended.’” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

REAL AMERICAN: A Memoir by Julie Lythcott-Haims
A fearless debut memoir in which beloved and bestselling HOW TO RAISE AN ADULT author Julie Lythcott-Haims pulls no punches in her recollections of growing up a biracial black woman in America. “Using powerfully effective prose, the author explains the impacts of racism on her daily life in both small and large ways, its chipping away at her feelings of self-worth. A compelling and important addition to any collection of personal narratives by women of color.” — Library Journal, starred review

NASTY WOMEN: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump’s America, edited by Samhita Mukhopadhyay & Kate Harding
“Twenty-three influential and eloquent feminist writers of the twenty-first century have come together to create this searing and urgent collection. This book invites readers to converse, comfort, and hold one another accountable in the hope of igniting radical, intersectional change.” — Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

Stars for MANDELA: My Prisoner, My Friend

This Friday, we’re reading Christo Brand’s riveting biography: MANDELA: My Prisoner, My Friend.

Afrikaner Brand was a prison guard in the maximum security facility on remote Robben Island, given charge of the country’s most infamous inmate: Nelson Mandela. Over 12 years, Brand became Mandela’s confidant and accomplice, celebrating his prisoner’s triumphs and suffering through his setbacks, forming a bond that would endure throughout Mandela’s life.

Praise is glowing, starting with two starred reviews:

“[Brand] paints a vivid picture of prison life in South Africa at the time, with its racial discrimination—no bread was given to black prisoners—and the guards’ own isolation from news of the outside world. The central focus of this extraordinary book, however, is a remarkable friendship that bridged age, race, and politics, as Mandela went from prisoner to secret negotiator, and eventually became a revered president.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review & 8/25/14 Pick of the Week

“[Brand] quotes Mandela’s LONG WALK TO FREEDOM that the most important person in any prisoner’s life is not the minister of justice or the prison superintendent but the warder in the prisoner’s section, and many readers of that iconic autobiography will want this for the in-depth perspective and intimate honesty of another insider’s view, then and now.” Booklist, starred review

“This is really a tale of two men and their shared humanity in an inhuman place. A worthy addition to the canon of Mandela literature that details a relationship that many knew about but few truly understood.” — Kirkus Reviews

Expect more major media coverage, including Vanity Fair Hot Type (December issue) closer to publication.

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