Reviews and Publicity

Nonfiction Spotlight (08/16/17)

Baseball, psychoanalysis, and literary luminaries are the stars of today’s Nonfiction spotlight:

Electric October: Seven World Series Games, Six Lives, Five Minutes of Fame That Lasted Forever by Kevin Cook

“Entertaining, well-researched history…”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

Freud: The Making of an Illusion by Frederick Crews

“This thorough dismantling of one of modernity’s founding figures is sure to be met with controversy.”–Booklist, starred review

The World Broke in Two: Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster and the Year That Changed Literature by Bill Goldstein

“Goldstein’s ardently detailed, many-faceted story of a pivotal literary year illuminates all that these tormented visionaries had to overcome to “make the modern happen.”–Booklist

Teen Talk Tuesday (08/15/17)

Bad Girl Gone by Temple Matthews

“Paranormal romance meets murder mystery in this YA tale…VERDICT A good addition to any YA murder mystery collection.”–School Library Journal

Fear Street Super Thriller: Nightmares (2 Books in 1: The Dead Boyfriend; Give me a K-I-L-L) by R. L. Stine

Now in one volume, master of horror R.L. Stine delivers two bone-chilling stories of teens in danger in the small town of Shadyside, where danger and violence looms on every darkened street corner.

Trish Trash #2 by Jessica Abel

Trish and her family nurse the alien she discovered back to health. But will the added burden of another mouth to feed force Trish to give up her roller derby dreams?

Anna & Froga: Completely Bubu by Anouk Ricard

Anna and Froga: Completely Bubu collects all five issues of the acclaimed Anna & Froga series into an accessible paperback. Ricard’s vibrant world shines with visual puns and deft animal caricatures, making Anna & Froga enjoyable for kids and their parents alike.

Guinness World Records: Amazing Animals

This brand-new book of fantastic beasts is a celebration of incredible creatures great and small. But this is far from your typical wildlife encyclopaedia… Marvel at super-pets that have mastered extreme sports, and giggle at some of the most unlikely furry friendships. Meet the planet’s animal celebrities; some will make you go “Ahhh!” – such as the world’s biggest babies – and some will make you go “Eeek!” (wait til you see Rosi, the spider who’s as big as a dinner plate!), but all of them will amaze and amuse you.

The Memory of Things by Gae Polisner

The powerful story of two teenagers finding friendship, comfort, and first love in the days following 9/11 as their fractured city tries to put itself back together.

“A love letter to the New Yorkers who rallied together, this is also an exploration of the intense bonds that form during a crisis. Detailed and well-researched, it’s sure to make young readers curious about those unforgettable days after the twin towers fell. A fictional but realistic tale of how two New York City teens survived the unthinkable together.”–Kirkus Reviews

 

Check Out Our Stars! (08/14/17)

All of the today’s featured titles have received at least 2 starred reviews!

To Die In Spring by Ralf Rothmann

3 starred reviews!

“Brilliant…Spare and elegant, the novel paints a quietly harrowing picture of the lasting effects of human violence and offers brief, poignant glimpses into the natural world (especially when members of the animal kingdom wander unknowingly into the war zone). Directly confronting issues of responsibility, accountability, and legacy, this is an undeniably powerful work.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Searing, haunting, incandescent: Rothmann’s new novel is a vital addition to the trove of wartime fiction.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“A quietly unsettling triumph for Rothmann.”– Booklist, starred review

Magicians Impossible by Brad Abraham

“From its action-packed opening sequence, this is a cinematic, fast-paced debut from a writer more known in comics, television, and film.”–Library Journal, starred review

“Jason fighting the forces of evil and learning about his powers is an amusing and captivating adventure.”–Booklist, starred review

A Disappearance in Damascus: Friendship and Survival in the Shadow of War by Deborah Campbell

“Campbell’s story includes not only her stark and frightening experiences in Damascus, but also her fracturing love life back home as well as background on the Iraq War and ensuing civil war and the frangible stability in Syria…. Campbell’s text races along—catching readers’ hearts as it goes…. A powerful book. In the stormwater’s swirl, Campbell has found a bright and tender leaf to follow, and the effect on readers will be transformative.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Campbell’s captivating writing allows readers to see inside the life of a foreign correspondent and the bonds forged and broken through investigative reporting.”–Booklist, starred review

Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016 by Frank Bidart

“Throughout his long and celebrated career, Bidart has conducted a single-minded exploration of the sources and meanings of emotional intensity, the passions, fears, and cravings that drive people to do what we do, often against our own interests . . . Relentless and ever willing to face his demons, no matter how terrifying, in the interest of making great art, Bidart is, to my ear, one of the very few major living poets who never wavers, never repeats himself (though he has always orbited the same concerns), and extends his questing and questioning through each new work. This collected poems is an almost overwhelming bounty, a permanent book.”–Publishers Weekly, boxed, starredsignature review

“Bidart’s poems strive, more than anything else, to present particular voices speaking . . . more than to express meaning. But meaning there is, of course, concerning love, death, conflict, ambition, and disappointment, found between lacunae and jump cuts like in a Godard movie or an Eliot poem.”–Booklist, starred review

 

SOURDOUGH + DEAR FAHRENHEIT 451 = September 2017 LibraryReads picks!

HUZZAH! Both SOURDOUGH by Robin Sloan and DEAR FAHRENHEIT 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks by Annie Spence are September 2017 LibraryReads picks!

SOURDOUGH by Robin Sloan

“Having launched himself with MR. PENUMBRA’S 24-HOUR BOOKSTORE, a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist in first fiction with best-book and Alex Award claims to fame, Sloan here keeps his San Francisco setting but makes his main subject bread. Lois Clary, a software engineer at an ambitious robotics company called General Dexterity, is bequeathed a sourdough starter by her favorite hole-in-the-wall restaurateurs when they leave town fast owing to visa problems. Soon she’s baking up a storm and confounding the jury that decides who can sell in Bay Area markets by dreaming up her own market blending food and technology.” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

“This inventive novel, from the author of MR. PENUMBRA’S 24-HOUR BOOKSTORE (2012), is filled with crisp humor and weird but endearing characters…At once a parody of startup culture and a foodie romp, Sourdough is an airy delight, perfect for those who like a little magic with their meals, as in Laura
Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate (1992).”–Booklist, starred review

DEAR FAHRENHEIT 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks by Annie Spence

“Library lovers will dig the apropos subject headings she gives each letter; fellow bibliophiles will swoon at her well-articulated feelings about her favorites; all will find the breakup notes oddly cathartic (“I’m putting you in a Little Free Library”) and appreciate her book’s final, readers’-advisory-informed section of superb reading lists of all sorts…clever, heartfelt, and often-funny…Someday, somewhere, a book addressed in a loving letter might be one of hers: Dear Dear Fahrenheit 451, thanks for the lovely reminder of the ways we find ourselves in books.”—Booklist, starred review

“This book should appeal to readers who are looking for the next Texts from Jane Eyre, or those who enjoyed that concept but don’t especially like texting. It will also attract anyone who, upon walking into someone’s house, first side-eyes the bookshelves and instantly judges. VERDICT Highly recommended.”–Library Journal, starred review

#thrillerthursday (08/10/17)

It’s #thrillerthursday and we’re reading:

City of Saviors by Rachel Howzell Hall

“Lou . . . is a formidable fighter―someone you want on your side.”―New York Times Book Review

“Hall has created a strong and likable African American detective who rivals Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch in grit, intelligence, and tenacity.”―Library Journal, starred review on Trail of Echoes

“A fresh voice in crime fiction.”―Lee Child, New York Times bestselling author

Ordeal by Jorn Lier Horst

“Once a senior investigating officer on the Norwegian police force, Horst published his first crime fiction in 2004 and hasn’t looked back; his William Wisting series has more than 500,000 copies out there, and his numerous honors include the prestigious Glass Key award for best crime novel by a Nordic author. Here, single mother Sofie Lund inherits her despised grandfather’s house and opens the basement safe to find shocking information that proves essential to a case the inspector has been trying to crack for a long time.”–LJ, pre-pub alert

Fall YA Announcements, Booklist Webinar — Macmillan Titles (08/08/17)

So you missed Booklist‘s “Fall YA Announcements, 2017” Webinar… We got you! Here are the titles we covered:

CARAVAL by STEPHANIE GARBER

WONDERFUL FEELS LIKE THIS by SARA LOVESTAM

I HATE EVERYONE BUT YOU by DUNN + RASKIN

EVERYTHING MUST GO by JENNY FRAN DAVIS

SHADOWSONG by S. JAE-JONES

SUN WARRIOR by P.C. CAST

BETWEEN THE BLADE AND THE HEART by AMANDA HOCKING

FROM THE EARTH TO THE SHADOWS by AMANDA HOCKING

NOT NOW, NOT EVER by LILLY ANDERSON

FLIGHT SEASON by MARIE MARQUARDT

FADE TO US by JULIA DAY

THIS HEART OF MINE by C.C. HUNTER

IN SIGHT OF STARS by GAE POLISNER

EAT YOUR FEELINGS by LINDSEY SMITH

GIRLS MADE OF SNOW AND GLASS by MELISSA BASHARDOUST

FRANKIE by SHIVAUN PLOZZA

13 MINUTES by SARAH PINBOROUGH

THE HAZEL WOOD by MELISSA ALBERT

GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS: AMAZING ANIMALS

GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS: SCIENCE & STUFF

Many of these titles have an e-galley available on Edelweiss!  Don’t see the green button? Then get whitelisted on Edelweiss.

Sneak Peek: September 2017 Indie Next List

The September 2017 Indie Next list includes 1 Macmillan title!

The Resurrection of Joan Ashby by Cherise Wolas

“This breathtaking…novel will do for motherhood what Gone Girl did for marriage. ‘A story requires two things: a great story to tell and the bravery to tell it,’ Joan observes. Wolas’ debut expertly checks off both boxes.”—Booklist, starred review

“Like John Irving’s The World According to Garp, this is a look at the life of a writer that will entertain many nonwriters. Like Lauren Groff’s Fates and Furies, it’s a sharp-eyed portrait of the artist as spouse and householder. From the start, one wonders how Wolas is possibly going to pay off the idea that her heroine is such a genius. Verdict: few could do better.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

 

Featured Author: Jim Fergus (08/07/17)

Getting to know Jim Fergus…

The Vengeance of Mothers

“Twenty years on, Fergus’ best-selling novel, One Thousand White Women (1998), remains vivid in readers’ memories and continues to be discovered by historical-fiction fans. He now continues the intriguing tale of the U.S. government’s controversial, little-publicized, assimilation-oriented Brides forIndians program… It’s a gripping tale, a history lesson infused with both sadness at the violence perpetuated against the Cheyenne and awe at the endurance of this remarkable group of women. HIGHDEMAND BACKSTORY: With a twentieth-anniversary edition of Fergus’ million-copy hit, One Thousand White Women, and a major publicity campaign for the long-awaited sequel, requests will be legion.”–Booklist, starred review

One Thousand White Women

One Thousand White Women begins with May Dodd’s journey west into the unknown. A government program in which women are brought west as brides for the Cheyenne, is her vehicle. What follows is the story of May’s adventures: her marriage to Little Wolf, chief of the Cheyenne nation, and her conflict of being caught between two worlds, loving two men, living two lives. Jim Fergus has so vividly depicted the American West that it is as if these diaries are a capsule in time.

“An impressive historical…terse, convincing, and affecting.” —Kirkus Reviews

 

#thrillerthursday (08/03/17)

Hey hey hey welcome to another #thrillerthursday! Today we’re talkin’ about:

Gone Gull by Donna Andrews

“In her 21st outing (after Die Like an Eagle), Meg is helping out her grandmother at the newly opened Biscuit Mountain Craft Center. A spate of vandalism at the center keeps Meg occupied while her irascible grandfather hunts for a rare and elusive gull. But then a dead body turns up. Fans will find all the beloved hallmarks of this award-winning series: fresh characters, an engaging puzzle, and delightful humor.”–Library Journal

“Witty prose and distinctive characters set this long-running series above the cozy pack.”–Publishers Weekly

Stasi Child by David Young

“Outstanding… Fans of Martin Cruz Smith’s Arkady Renko will welcome Müller.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

No Mortal Thing by Gerlad Seymour

“Now well into his seventies, Seymour keeps producing big novels peopled by large casts of conflicted characters… Seymour remains in fine form.”–Booklist

SMILE It’s Your #bookbday (08/02/17)

Happy #bookbday to:

HAPPINESS: The Crooked Little Road to Semi-Ever After by Heather Harpham

Happiness is an incredibly moving account of survival and love that will inspire readers to hold on tight to what’s truly important.”–Booklist

“In this moving memoir. . . [Harpham] describes with warmth, fearless honesty, and humor the harrowing saga of what happened after she gave birth…Harpham has written a heartfelt exploration of familial bonds and the sometimes incredibly bumpy journey one must take to get to contentment.” —Publishers Weekly

THE EMOJI CODE: The Linguistics Behind Smiley Faces and Scaredy Cats by Vyvyan Evans

Vyvyan Evans’s Emoji Code charts the evolutionary origins of language, the social and cultural factors that govern its use, change, and development; as well as what it reveals about the human mind. In most communication, nonverbal cues are our emotional expression, signal our personality, and are our attitude toward our addressee. They provide the essential means of nuance and are essential to getting our ideas across. But in digital communication, these cues are missing, which can lead to miscommunication. The explosion of emoji, in less than four years, has arisen precisely because it fulfills exactly these functions which are essential for communication but are otherwise absent in texts and emails. Evans persuasively argues that emoji add tone and an emotional voice and nuance, making us more effective communicators in the digital age.

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