Reviews and Publicity

Af/Am Fiction

From contemporary to urban fiction, these three new books by African American writers are perfect for patrons who love romance and drama:

AND THEN THERE WAS ME by Sadeqa Johnson
The story of Bea, a woman wrestling with motherhood, an unfaithful husband, and a friend who may not be who she seems, all while trying to make sense of her new neighborhood. “Combining the warmth and sisterhood of Terry McMillan’s novels and the tragedies and healing of those from Kristin Hannah, this book should find a wide, satisfied readership.” — Booklist

THE STREETS HAVE NO KING by JaQuavis Coleman
After 7 years of prison, multi-millionaire drug mogul Kane Garrett is back on the streets, but this time he’s teaching a college class, infusing business principles with his signature ruthless edge he developed in the streets. When a student—and heavy heroin dealer—named Basil catches Kane’s eye, Kane takes him on as a protégé and together, they build the biggest, smartest drug trafficking business the state has ever seen. But when Basil meets Moriah, Kane’s only daughter, lines get crossed and their dominant business union becomes a deadly rivalry. readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (4/25/17 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to two daring debuts and three works of women’s fiction perfect for book clubs:

THE STANDARD GRAND by Jay Baron Nicorvo
A May 2017 Indie Next pick & a Library Journal Spring 2017 Debut Novels pick! An Army trucker goes AWOL before her third deployment, and ends up in the Standard Grand, a sanctuary for homeless veterans suffering from PTSD in the Catskill Mountains. But the Grand is sitting on a shale formation coveted by a corporate executive. “…Nicorvo’s muscular and energetic prose will stun readers with its poignancy, while providing a punch to the solar plexus. Alongside BILLY LYNN’S LONG, HALFTIME WALK and YELLOW BIRDS, THE STANDARD GRAND is an important and deeply human contribution to the national conversation.” — Booklist, starred review

OOLA by Brittany Newell
A provocative and impressive debut delivered with a uniquely sinister lyricism by a brilliant 21-year-old; a story about sex, privilege, desire, and creativity in the post-college years. “Newell’s rangy, circuitous tale is a kind of queer Nadja for millennials with a self-satirizing—and satisfying—bite. A dreamy and provocative exploration of sex, privilege, and self-discovery.” — Kirkus Reviews

THE F WORD by Liza Palmer
At once a funny, whip-smart sendup of L.A. culture and an irresistible love story about how sometimes who we become isn’t who we really are. “A funny and fantastic lesson on how perfection doesn’t translate to happiness is served up in Palmer’s latest. This is a smart and sardonic novel with a genuine voice.” — Publishers Weekly

YOU’RE THE ONE THAT I WANT by Giovanna Fletcher
“This is a warm, humorous, at times heartbreaking novel of three childhood friends, told from their alternating points-of-view and reminiscent of Cecelia Ahern’s ROSIE DUNNE. It reads like a diary readers won’t be able to put down, with characters they would like to spend more time with and get to know. A fresh take on the classic love-triangle story.” — Booklist readmoreremove

LJ Genre Spotlight: Mystery

Library Journal‘s recent genre spotlight included five Macmillan mysteries:

From the pen of Emmy Award–winning Matt Goldman, whose credits include Seinfeld, comes GONE TO DUST (Forge, Aug.), a twisty and entertaining Minneapolis-set mystery that features a Jewish private investigator.

Other crime-solving protagonists of color returning this season include African American female homicide detective Lou Norton in Rachel Howzell Hall’s CITY OF SAVIORS (Forge, Aug.).

East Berlin in the 1970s provides the backdrop for David Young’s debut thriller, STASI CHILD (Minotaur, Aug.), in which an East German police officer investigates the death of a teenage girl whose body is found at the foot of the Berlin Wall—strangely, it appears the victim was trying to escape from West Berlin.

A serial killer stalks perestroika Moscow, circa 1985, in Jack Grimwood’s MOSKVA (Thomas Dunne, Jul.).

November marks best-selling Icelandic author Arnaldur Indridason’s new series launch, THE SHADOW DISTRICT (Minotaur).

Happy Early #BookBday (4/17/17 Edition)

Since we’ll be off to the Texas Library Association conference tomorrow, we wanted to wish an early #BookBday to these new titles:

ARARAT by Christopher Golden
New York Times bestselling author Golden’s supernatural thriller about a mountain adventure that quickly turns into a horrific nightmare of biblical proportions. “The whole is more than the sum of its parts in this exceptional supernatural thriller from bestseller Golden. While the contours of the story line will be familiar to genre fans, Golden makes them feel fresh through solid prose, effective characterizations, and a willingness not to pull any plot punches.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

PW Best Books of Summer 2017

PWSummer2017Publishers Weekly’s editors recently selected their Best Books of Summer 2017, including these seven Macmillan titles:
Staff Picks (full list)

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
“About that thing on the cover—is it a genetically modified bird-of-paradise? Some cousin of the odoriferous corpse flower? I was intrigued from the moment I saw it, as is Rachel, the postapocalyptic scavenger who finds the improbably sentient and mutable creature—who ‘smelled of beach reeds on lazy summer afternoons and, beneath the sea salt, of passionflowers’—while picking through the fur of the gargantuan flying bear that terrorizes her devastated city. And then things start to get weird.” — Carolyn Juris, features editor

ISADORA by Amelia Gray
“Gray’s most recent book, the story collection GUTSHOT, was weird as hell and as visceral as its title. Whose life would be better for her to fictionalize, then, than that of notorious mother of modern dance Isadora Duncan? An openly bisexual communist and atheist in an era that condemned all three, Duncan was famous for wearing long, flowing scarves even up until her death, when her scarf got caught in one of the axles of the car she was riding in. Flung from the vehicle, Duncan died of a broken neck—a tragic end that will surely make for a riveting finale in Gray’s novel.” — John Maher, assistant news editor

Fiction (full list)

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
Ginder takes family dysfunction to its hysterical limit in this joyously ribald novel about siblings Alice and Paul begrudgingly attending the lavish wedding of their half-sister, Eloise, in England. Lovesick Alice and Paul—both in doomed relationships—see Eloise as the snotty daughter of a rich dad, and Donna, their mother, as a coldhearted widow who ditched all remnants of their father after his death. During the boozy pre-wedding days, the resentment and secrets come tumbling out in outbursts and hilariously bad decisions. readmoreremove

Friday Reads All-Stars

Happy Friday, friends! Our #FridayReads have multiple starred reviews:

DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES by Seanan McGuire — 3 starred reviews! 
Beautifully crafted and smartly written, this fairy-tale novella is everything that speculative fiction readers look for: fantastical worlds, diverse characters, and prose that hits home with its emotional truths.” Library Journal, starred review

“McGuire’s exquisitely written fairy tale is about the choices that can alter the course of a life forever, lost innocence, and what it is to love and be loved.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Exquisitely crafted, this is the rare companion novel that can stand alone.”Booklist, starred review

MY LIFE WITH BOB: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues by Pamela Paul
“Titles about reading and books abound, but this memoir stands in a class by itself. Bibliophiles will treasure, but the addictive storytelling and high-quality writing will vastly increase its audience. Highly recommended.” — Library Journal, starred review

“Readers will be drawn to this witty and authentic tribute to the extraordinary power of books.” Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (4/13/17 Edition)

We’ve got two amazing debuts and three excellent series entries for you this #ThrillerThursday:

IF WE WERE VILLAINS by M.L. Rio
A literary debut in the tradition of Donna Tartt’s THE SECRET HISTORY about a group of seven young actors studying Shakespeare at an elite arts school who find their friendship turned into nasty rivalry that leaves one of them dead after a teacher switches around the in-character casting. “This novel about obsession at the conservatory will thoroughly obsess you.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

THREE ENVELOPES by Nir Hezroni
A thrilling debut that delves into the twisted mind of a rogue agent in the Israeli intelligence agency and his mysterious plot for revenge. “Hezroni’s superior thriller debut will send chills up the spines of even jaded genre fans. Hezroni maintains a high level of suspense as he expertly toggles between past and present en route to the heart-stopping conclusion.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

DEVIL’S BREATH by G.M. Malliet
Max Tudor must contend with his new role as a father as well as the murder of a glamorous film star in the next installment in Malliet’s wildly popular series. “Though dedicated readers may miss local favorites, it’s great to see the return of Malliet’s wit in a high-seas whodunit that deftly skewers the Hollywood high life.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

Maximum Shelf: HAPPINESS

MaxShelf-HappinessToday’s Maximum Shelf Awareness feature is HAPPINESS: The Crooked Little Road to Semi-Ever After by Heather Harpham.

In her debut memoir, award-winning playwright and performance artist Heather Harpham recounts her charming courtship with a New Yorker named Brian, and how it ends, full stop, when Heather becomes pregnant. Heather returns home to California to deliver their daughter alone, buoyed by family and friends. Mere hours after Gracie’s arrival, Heather’s first precious moments of happiness with her newborn are shattered when she learns her daughter has a rare blood condition that places her at high risk for brain damage or death. Brian reappears as Gracie’s condition grows dire; together Heather and Brian have to decide what they are willing to risk to ensure their girl sees adulthood.

“Harpham’s ability to capture an audience’s emotions takes center stage as a memoirist. Her deeply personal yet witty narrative style makes the reader feel instantly connected, as if Harpham is a close friend traveling a familiar ‘crooked little road to semi-ever after.’ Hers is a journey evoking a spectrum of emotions: hope, sadness, anger and, yes, happiness.” — Shelf Awareness

See the full summary, review and interview with Heather Harpham on Shelf-Awareness.com.

HAPPINESS will be available from Henry Holt & Company on August 1, 2017.

New Nonfiction – April 2017

Biographies, histories, manifestos and more! Take a look at the new nonfiction books perfect for your patrons this April:

FEAR CITY: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein
Two starred reviews! “Phillips-Fein, professor of history at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, makes municipal bonds exciting in this painstakingly researched revisionist account of the 1970s fiscal crisis that shook New York to its core. The book should be required reading for all those interested in the past, present, and future of democratic politics.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman, Jr.
One of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017! Yale legal scholar and former public defender James Forman Jr. provides an original and consequential argument about race, crime, and the law, weighing the tragic role that some African Americans themselves play in escalating the war on crime. “The book achieves genuine immediacy, due not only to the topical subject, but also to Forman’s personal experiences within the legal system. Possibly controversial, undoubtedly argumentative, Forman’s survey offers a refreshing breath of fresh air on the crisis in American policing.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

CLIMATE OF HOPE: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet by Michael Bloomberg & Carl Pope
From NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former head of the Sierra Club Carl Pope comes a manifesto on how the benefits of taking action on climate change are concrete, immediate, and immense. “Upbeat, pragmatic, eloquent, and supremely well-informed, Bloomberg and Pope present striking statistics, cogently describe diverse examples of energy reforms and innovations across the U.S. and around the world, and make clear on both personal and social levels why a low-carbon future is possible, necessary, and of great benefit to everyone.” — Booklist, starred review

MANDERLEY FOREVER: A Biography of Daphne du Maurier by Tatiana de Rosnay
The nonfiction debut from beloved international sensation and #1 New York Times bestselling author of SARAH’S KEY: her biography of novelist Daphne du Maurier. “…this outstanding biography will attract du Maurier devotees of all ages.” — Library Journal, starred review

A COLORFUL WAY OF LIVING: How to Be More, Create More, Do More the Vera Bradley Way by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard
From the co-founder of the Vera Bradley empire, an inspirational and practical book that shows women how to reinvent their lives and awaken their full potential, at any age. “This empowering offering is replete with practical strategies for leading a fulfilled life. Baekgaard’s optimistic take on life and values-based leadership style will inspire readers, particularly those already smitten with her company’s colorful goods.” — Publishers Weekly

MY MOTHER’S KITCHEN: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life by Peter Gethers
A funny, moving memoir about a son’s discovery that his mother has a genius for understanding the intimate connections between cooking, people and love. “A well-written and engaging memoir, particularly for foodies. Also a great primer on second acts and living (and dying) well.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (4/11/17 Edition)

Oh what a lovely day for a #BookBday!

ONE PERFECT LIE by Lisa Scottoline
In New York Times bestselling Scottoline’s latest novel of domestic suspense, the single mother of a shy but athletically gifted high school pitcher worries that her son is being led astray by a rich, charismatic teammate hiding a dangerous past. Add a handsome stranger posing as a new teacher and the mix becomes combustible. “This stand-alone suspense novel is not to be missed by Scottoline’s fans as well as other readers who relish fast-paced thrillers by Linda Fairstein and John Grisham.” — Library Journal

VOID STAR by Zachary Mason
A riveting, beautifully written, fugue-like novel of AIs, memory, violence, and mortality set in a near-future San Francisco. “Mason’s follow-up to THE LOST BOOKS OF THE ODYSSEY is a complex and spellbinding tale of a future where self-preservation, in every sense of the word, is a victory.” — Library Journal, starred review

AND THEN THERE WAS ME by Sadeqa Johnson
The story of Bea, a woman wrestling with motherhood, an unfaithful husband, and a friend who may not be who she seems, all while trying to make sense of her new neighborhood. “Combining the warmth and sisterhood of Terry McMillan’s novels and the tragedies and healing of those from Kristin Hannah, this book should find a wide, satisfied readership.” — Booklist readmoreremove

css.php