Happy #BookBday (11/1/16 Edition)

Oh what a lovely day for a #BookBday!

INVISIBLE PLANETS: Contemporary Chinese Science Fiction in Translation by Ken Liu
Two starred reviews! “This stellar anthology of 13 stories selected and translated by Liu brings the best of Chinese science fiction to anglophones. Although greatly varied in theme and approach, all of these stories impress with their visionary sweep and scope. The inclusion of three essays on the significance of science fiction to China and its writers underscores the thoughtfulness that Liu put into curating this superb compilation.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

PULL ME UNDER by Kelly Luce
Rio Silvestri is the Japanese American daughter of a revered Japanese violinist; she hasn’t spoken to him since she left her home country for the United States after fatally stabbing a school bully. Twenty years later, a mysterious package arrives on her doorstep—along with news of her father’s death—forcing her to return to Japan and confront her past. “Luce’s debut novel…deftly evokes Japan without exoticizing it… The final act is the novel’s strongest and most confident, weaving the book’s threads together and leaving a lasting reverberation.” — Publishers Weekly

REPORTS ON THE INTERNET APOCALYPSE by Wayne Gladstone
In the third and final installment of the Internet Apocalypse Trilogy, Gladstone, the would-be Internet Messiah, finds himself in exile from America, falsely accused of terrorism and murder. When the World Wide Web returns in a highly compromised and commercialized state, possibly due to the efforts of a billionaire presidential candidate, Gladstone and his pursuers must collaborate in an attempt to reclaim a free and open Internet. “…this is a slow-burning noir.” — Booklist

THE MEMORY STONES by Caroline Brothers
The compelling story of a young woman’s disappearance in 1970s Argentina, a story of family tragedy—and national tragedy—with consequences echoing through generations. “Depicting the despair and hope of a family recovering from the horrors of military rule, it is a devastating portrait of a country in the grip of true terror, and the long, dark shadow such systemic violence leaves behind.”
Publishers Weekly

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.