Top YA Picks for Winter 2011!

Spring is just around the corner so here's one last look at some of our favorite YA Winter titles!

Miles from Ordinary
Carol Lynch Williams

It's the first day of summer and Lacey has a new job at the library. Her mom, who seems so much better these days, has a new job, too. But hope of a normal life is too much to ask for as memories of the past rush in and Lacey's day turns from a new beginning to a desperate scramble to stay afloat.

 

 

Born at Midnight
C. C. Hunter

Welcome to Shadow Falls: a camp for vampires, shapeshifters, witches, and Kylie Galen. Shadow Falls is a place for teens to learn skills that will help them harness their supernatural powers, but Kylie has enough trouble balancing the affections of Derek the half-fae and Lucas the werewolf.

 

Future Imperfect
K. Ryer Breese

Ade Patience is gifted with the rare ability to see the future. Unlike the others at his high school with this gift, Ade is addicted to the high that comes with breaking the laws of physics. If he doesn't get clean soon, he'll end up killing himself.

 

 

Fall for Anything
Courtney Summers

When Eddie Reeves’s father commits suicide her life is consumed with the need to find out why. When a former student of her father’s shows up and seems to have answers and affection for Eddie she pushes on only to find some questions are better left unanswered.

 

 

Dark Mirror
M. J. Putney

The earl and countess of Fairmount have a shameful secret: their daughter Victoria's blood is tainted with magic. When Tory exposes her magical powers the charmed life she was born to disappears and she's shipped off to reform school. Despite her parents' hope that her magic will be suppressed, Tory may find her powers more valuable than vile.

 

 

The Demon Trapper's Daughter
Jana Oliver

Not only does Riley Blackthorne spend her days managing homework, an inconvenient crush, and pesky demons, she does it all in the shadow of her father, the legendary Demon Trapper, Paul Blackthorne. Working as an entry-level Trapper should have been an easy way to learn the family business, but even routine assignments can get dangerous fast.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.