Thriller Thursday (4/23/15 Edition)

Whether you’re looking to read true crime, a psychological thriller, or settle in with your favorite old (or new) detective, we’ve got the perfect #ThrillerThursday mystery for you:

ONE OF US by Åsne Seierstad
The nonfiction horror story told in ONE OF US moves slowly, inexorably and with tremendous authority. It’s said that exact detail is uniquely helpful when it comes to mending after terrible events. If it is true, as Stephen Jay Gould contended, that ‘nothing matches the holiness and fascination of accurate and intricate detail,’ then Ms. Seierstad has delivered a holy volume indeed.” — The New York Times

REYKJAVIK NIGHTS by Arnaldur Indridason
In this “riveting” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) prequel set in late-1960s Reykjavík, Indridason plumbs the backstory of his series lead, somber Insp. Erlendur Sveinsson. “The Icelandic author’s latest novel, REYKJAVIK NIGHTS nicely illustrates the qualities that make his books so deeply pleasurable.” — New York Times Book Review

A JUNE OF ORDINARY MURDERS by Conor Brady
This debut Victorian-era mystery finds Dublin detective sergeant Joe Swallow on the trail of a series of crimes that paints a much bigger picture. “Fans of mysteries that capture the flavor of the past will hope that Swallow has a long literary life.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE MASQUE OF A MURDERER by Susanna Calkins
“Third in the Lucy Campion historical-mystery series, this absorbing puzzler touches on the religious, social, and political changes in Restoration London as experienced by a wide cast of characters. Calkins’ tantalizing clues and rich historical details depicting everyday life and class differences draw readers into the seventeenth century, led by the piquant and elusive Lucy, whose heart is split between two suitors, her job precarious, and whose dauntless curiosity never flags.” — Booklist

YOU CAN TRUST ME by Sophie McKenzie
The suspicious circumstances of her best friend’s suicide drive a woman to the possibility that it was murder—a murder which might involve the same man who killed her sister eighteen years ago. “McKenzie keeps the pace mostly brisk…[and] the diary entries from the killer that are interspersed throughout are quite creepy. …readers will be eager to discover the murderer’s identity.” — Library Journal

Share your reads with us @MacmillanLib this #ThrillerThursday.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.