Articles tagged "Wuthering Heights"

Come one, come all to Books for Teens 2017!

BFT2017forweb
It’s September 1st, and of course we’re thinking about going back to school. We’ve got a new backpack, a binder full of college ruled and hole-punched paper, lots of multi-colored gel pens, our daily planner covered in stickers, and most importantly, we’ve got SEVERAL books to read on the bus to and from school all year long.

Lucky for you, we’ve created not one, but TWO posters of our favorite reads for Fall 2016 and 2017! Download and print your copies (11×17 tabloid size) of BFT poster 1 & BFT poster 2, or email us for a physical copy (don’t forget to include your mailing address).

Then, make sure that you’re pre-approved on Edelweiss to download all of our available e-galleys, including many of the titles mentioned below. Click here to find out how to be whitelisted.

You can also view our Edelweiss collection of Books for Teens 2017 titles here.

Now on to the books!

I HATE EVERYONE BUT YOU by Gaby Dunn & Allison Raskin
Available September 5, 2017
Ages 14 to 19
Ava and Gen are two best friends heading off to their first semesters of college on opposite sides of the country. From first loves to weird roommates, heartbreak, self-discovery, coming out and mental health, the two document every moment in a series of texts and emails to each other. But as each changes and grows into her new life, will their friendship be able to survive the distance?

CARAVAL by Stephanie Garber
Ages 13 to 18

After years of wishing, Scarlett and little sister, Tella, finally attend Caraval, the legendary, once-a-year performance where the audience participates in the show. However, Tella is kidnapped by Caraval’s mastermind organizer, Legend, and the first person to find her wins the game. Scarlett has been told that everything that happens during Caraval is an elaborate performance, but whether it’s real or not, she must find Tella before the five nights of the game are over, otherwise her sister disappears forever. “[A] magnificent debut novel… Intriguing characters, an imaginative setting, and evocative writing combine to create a spellbinding tale of love, loss, sacrifice, and hope.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review  

THE MEMORY OF THINGS by Gae Polisner
Ages 12 to 18
A powerful novel about two teenagers finding friendship, comfort, and first love in the days immediately following 9/11 as their fractured city tries to put itself back together. “A touching look at the power of selflessness, memory, and hope in the face of tragedy.” — Booklist

THE POSSIBILITY OF SOMEWHERE by Julia Day
Ages 12 to 18
Ash Gupta is admired by his peers, enjoying his last year of classes and getting the kind of grades that his wealthy, immigrant parents expect. Eden Moore is the unpopular, sharp-tongued girl from the trailer park most likely to become class valedictorian. What can the future hold for two passionate souls from totally different worlds? “This is an engaging read. The narrative takes place during one semester of school, and it’s full of drama, struggles with money and grades, family turmoil, and identity issues.”
School Library Journal

WAR DOGS: Tales of Canine Heroism, History, and Love by Rebecca Frankel
Ages 12 to 18
In this special edition adapted specifically for a younger audience, Frankel gives further insight into her work as a journalist and how it led her to explore the important role that dogs and their handlers/soldiers have played in America’s most recent military conflicts. “A solid choice for those who love dogs and are interested in all things military.” — School Library Journal

THE BOY WHO KILLED GRANT PARKER by Kat Spears
Ages 13 to 18

From the author of the YALSA 2015 Best Fiction for Young Adults pick, SWAY, comes a high stakes contemporary story of a city teen who moves to a small town and finds himself head to head with the local bully.

BREAKAWAY by Kat Spears (ages 14-18) is now available in trade paperback.

THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984-1985: A Graphic Memoir by Riad Sattouf
THREE starred reviews! “In the second volume of an acclaimed five-part graphic memoir, originally published in France, cartoonist Sattouf captures the discomfiting and occasionally humorous details of his first year in school in a Syria that is casually anti-Semitic and not particularly kind to anyone.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE DEAD BOYFRIEND by R.L. Stine (Fear Street series #5)
Ages 12 to 18
Colin is Caitlin’s first real boyfriend, so when she sees Colin with another girl, Caitlin completely loses it. When she comes back to her senses, she realizes that Colin is dead. But if Colin is dead, how is he staring at her across a crowded party?

GIVE ME A K-I-L-L by R.L. Stine (Fear Street series #6)
Available April 4, 2017
Ages 14 to 18

Heather Wyatt just transferred from her old school, where she was a cheerleading star, and is eager to join the squad at Shadyside High. There’s only one other girl who stands in her way—rich, spoiled Devra Dalby, who is also trying out for the one open slot. The competition is anything but friendly—and it ends in murder.

FEAR STREET SUPER THRILLER: SECRETS: THE LOST GIRL & CAN YOU KEEP A SECRET by R.L. Stine (ages 12-18) is now available in trade paperback.

FEAR STREET SUPER THRILLERS: NIGHTMARES by R.L. Stine (ages 12-18) will be available in trade paperback on August 1, 2017.

WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS by Anna-Marie McLemore
Ages 12 to 18
Longlisted for the 2016 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature and three starred reviews!
From Morris Award finalist Anna-Marie McLemore comes a second stunning novel tinged with magic, about a girl with roses that grow from her wrist who happens to be hiding the truth, a boy with past secrets who paints moons and hangs them in trees, and four sisters rumored to be witches, who could ruin them both. “With luminous prose infused with Latino folklore and magical realism, this mixes fairy-tale ingredients with the elegance of a love story, with all of it rooted in a deeply real sense of humanity. Lovely, necessary, and true.”
Booklist, starred review 

THE WEIGHT OF FEATHERS by Anna-Marie McLemore (ages 14-18) will be available in trade paperback on September 26, 2017. readmoreremove

The Giant 2016 Graphic Novel Roundup!

The saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words” and that’s certainly true of graphic novels. Thanks to comic book characters dominating pop culture, the format has been enjoying a boom and readers are coming to the medium in droves.

Publishers Weekly recently profiled graphic novel publisher Papercutz, which publishes between 50 and 60 books per year, mostly aimed at children ages 8–12. Their Super Genius imprint publishes books for teen readers and a new imprint called Charmz, aimed at pre-teen & early teen girls, will launch in May 2017.

Papercutz’s catalog includes bestselling licensed media properties, such as Barbie, Dennis the Menace, the Smurfs, Lego’s Ninjago and Bionicle series (though Lego moved the licenses to Little, Brown last year), a line of classic Disney graphic novels (DANTE’S INFERNO becomes MICKEY’S INFERNO, and X-MICKEY features X-Files-type supernatural escapades), as well as graphic novels based on a first-look deal with children’s TV network Nickelodeon.

Papercutz also rebooted select classics (WUTHERING HEIGHTS, THE JUNGLE, and THE INVISIBLE MAN to name a few) with artwork from acclaimed contemporary artists such as Rick Geary, Peter Kuper, and Gahan Wilson. Their first list in 2005 featured a manga-style graphic novel revival of the classic Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys adventure series, which are still in print and have together sold more than 800,000 copies.

Foreign imports are big, including France’s popular Ariol series by Emmanuel Guibert and Guillaume Bianco, and Antonello Dalena’s Ernest and Rebecca series. Italy’s bestselling prose series starring a time-traveling squirrel named Geronimo Stilton has done so well in the U.S. that Italy ran out of books and now Papercutz creates them.

Original graphic novels were an organic movement from the Geronimo Stilton books and Papercutz’s first original title was Deb Lucke’s THE LUNCH WITCH, followed by THE RED SHOES AND OTHER STORIES by Sandra Marrs and John Chalmers who create comics under the name Metaphrog. This November the house is publishing TRISH TRASH: Rollergirl of Mars, a YA SF graphic novel offering diversity—the book has a multiracial heroine—that was originally published in France but created by noted American cartoonist Jessica Abel.

The initial Charmz line (S’17) will simultaneously release the first four graphic novels in a planned series:
* CHLOE by Greg Tessier and Amandine, the story of a girl who is navigating life at a new school
* STITCHED by Mariah Huehner and Aaron Alexovich, a supernatural tale about a rag-doll girl who wakes up in a cemetery and must figure out who she is
* SWEETIES, based on Cathy Cassidy’s Chocolate Box Girls novels and adapted by Veronique Grisseaux and Anna Merli, about a girl who acquires four half-sisters when her father remarries
* THE GREAT COSMIC RACE by Amy Chu and Agnes Garbowska, a SF adventure story featuring an interstellar scavenger hunt, a smart girl, and an alien shapeshifter

Meanwhile, Library Journal offered their Graphic Novels Preview 2016 and noted many trends, starting with…
FEMALE CREATORS

Women writers and artists have historically been under­represented in graphic novels, but that seems poised to change based on the number of high-profile titles set for release in the coming year, ranging from humor to journalism to memoir and beyond. Among the most highly anticipated is Lynda Barry’s THE GREATEST OF MARLYS (Drawn & Quarterly, Aug.), a collection concentrating on one of best-selling Barry’s most beloved characters, eight-year-old Marlys. Through Marlys, Barry delves into the highs and lows of childhood and adolescence, capturing in unflinching detail the amusement and the horror of coming of age.

Lisa Hanawalt, perhaps best known as the designer behind the distinctive look of the animated Netflix series BoJack Horseman, moves fluidly between wit and pathos in HOT DOG TASTE TEST (Drawn & Quarterly, Jun.). While Hanawalt explores (and explodes) foodie culture in this new book, she also investigates relationships, identity issues, and more, all delivered in beautiful watercolors and an original and immensely funny voice.

Slightly less provocative but no less interesting an exploration of one artist’s quest for self-expression is Lucy Knisley’s memoir SOMETHING NEW: Tales from a Makeshift Bride (First Second, May), which details Knisley’s ventures in putting her own stamp on every facet of her wedding, from sewing her own dress to building the very barn in which the ceremony was held.

JOURNALISM AND NONFICTION

Riad Sattouf’s THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE, VOL. 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984–1985 (Holt, Sept.), the sequel to THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1978–1984, continues the author’s experiences moving among France, Libya, and Syria as a child. The second book finds the Sattoufs settled in Syria and struggling against obstacles both local and political.

Also exploring the Middle East, specifically the legacy of the Iraq War, is Sarah Glidden’s ROLLING BLACKOUTS (Drawn & Quarterly, Oct.), in which the author describes her travels as a journalist in Turkey, Iraq, and Syria.

FROM ABROAD

Graphic novels in translation continue to be massively popular, especially those originally published in Japanese. While the late Shigeru Mizuki is not the legend that [Osamu] Tezuka is, he is an important figure in his own right, and fans should be excited about Drawn & Quarterly’s THE BIRTH OF KITARO (May), the first of six volumes that will bring the Kitaro character to the United States for the first time. readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (3/10/14 Edition)

Hey hey, it’s time for another #BookBday! Today we celebrate:

BONES & ALL by Camille DeAngelis
A haunting coming-of-age story about a young outcast as she sets out on a journey to find her long-lost father, who can tell her why she does the bad thing she does—literally consuming anyone who gets too close to her. “Maren’s story also offers readers plenty to chew on: issues of feminism, family, and the very idea of flesh eating. What’s more, it’s a genuinely entertaining (though occasionally stomach-turning) story of a young ghoul’s coming of age. Delicious fun.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

A FIREPROOF HOME FOR THE BRIDE by Amy Scheibe
Scheibe’s “spectacular” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) sophomore effort explores the coming of age of a young Minnesota woman in the late 1950s. “Fans of Kathryn Stockett will identify strongly with the agonizing choices Emmy must make as ugly family secrets concerning racial hatred emerge. The author artfully folds fashion, cars, and music references into the story, and readers will delight in the surprise twist on the 1950s-style love affair that at first appears to be the perfect solution to the heroine’s woes.” — Library Journal
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