Articles tagged "Wuthering Heights"

Teen Talk Tuesday (5/16/17 Edition)

ewgcya-may2017Happy #ewgcya day! We’ve got a great YA e-books sale going on right now (through June 5) and here are our new teen and OK-for-YA adult titles out this month:

DEAR READER by Mary O’Connell
Ages 12 to 18
Gilmore Girls with magical realism! In this original, poignant modern-day take on Wuthering Heights, a high school senior searches for her teacher and meets a boy who may just be Heathcliff come to life. “The use of Wuthering Heights intensifies the impact of Flannery and Miss Sweeney’s corresponding journeys; even readers who haven’t read the classic will find significance in the parallels.” — Publishers Weekly

SONGS ABOUT A GIRL by Chris Russell
Ages 12 to 18
Charlie Bloom is happiest behind her camera, taking pictures of her former classmate Olly Samson’s new band, Fire&Lights. Soon, they’re the hottest boy band in the country and Charlie becomes caught between Olly and Fire&Lights’ gorgeous but damaged frontman, Gabriel West. As the boys’ rivalry threatens to tear the band apart, Charlie stumbles on a secret about the band—and herself—hidden within the lyrics of their new #1 single. “Confronting the fickleness of fame and the damaging effects of rumors and harassment, Russell’s debut is highly relevant in an age of social media furors and the constant churn of news.” — Publishers Weekly

THE LITTLE BOOK OF LIFE HACKS: How to Make Your Life Happier, Healthier, and More Beautiful by Yumi Sakugawa
Inspired by her popular “Secret Yumiverse” tips originally posted on WonderHowTo.com, Yumi offers a wide range of practical advice and fun tips for everything from how to remove dark circles from under your eyes, make cold brew iced coffee at home, throw the perfect apartment party on a budget and more! “Great advice on everyday matters, but the graphic form is valuable only for those who favor the use of illustrations to present information.” — Library Journal

VIOLET GRENADE by Victoria Scott
Ages 12 & up
Seventeen-year-old Domino Ray lives on the streets, until a woman named Madame Karina offers her a spot inside her home for entertainers in secluded West Texas. But after suffering weeks of bullying, and unearthing the madam’s secrets, Domino decides to leave, which proves harder than she thinks. But then, Madam Karina doesn’t know about the person living inside Domino’s mind. readmoreremove

Come one, come all to Books for Teens 2017!

BFT2017forweb
Lucky for you, we’ve created not one, but TWO posters of our favorite teen reads for 2017! Download and print your copies (11×17 tabloid size) of BFT poster 1 & BFT poster 2, or email us for a physical copy (don’t forget to include your mailing address).

Then, make sure that you’re pre-approved on Edelweiss to download all of our available e-galleys, including many of the titles mentioned below. Click here to find out how to be whitelisted.

You can also view our Edelweiss collection of Books for Teens 2017 titles here.

Now on to the books!

 

THE HAZEL WOOD by Melissa Albert
Available January 30, 2018
Ages 12 to 19

Welcome to The Hazel Wood, Melissa Albert’s fierce, captivating, contemporary fantasy about a seventeen-year-old girl who must venture into the world behind a pitch-dark, cult-classic, collection of fairy tales to save her mother…

 

 

 

 

 

 

I HATE EVERYONE BUT YOU by Gaby Dunn & Allison Raskin
Available September 5, 2017
Ages 14 to 19

Ava and Gen are two best friends heading off to their first semesters of college on opposite sides of the country. From first loves to weird roommates, heartbreak, self-discovery, coming out and mental health, the two document every moment in a series of texts and emails to each other. But as each changes and grows into her new life, will their friendship be able to survive the distance?

 

 

 

 

CARAVAL by Stephanie Garber
Ages 13 to 18

A 2018 Best Fiction for Young Adults nominee!

“[A] magnificent debut novel… Intriguing characters, an imaginative setting, and evocative writing combine to create a spellbinding tale of love, loss, sacrifice, and hope.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review  

 

 

 

FREEKS by Amanda Hocking
Ages 12 to 18

“This fun paranormal romance, wrapped up in a circus-tent setting, is recommended where the genre and the author’s books are popular. Hand to fans of Twilight and MTV’s Teen Wolf.” — School Library Journal

 

THE RADIUS OF US by Marie Marquardt
Ages 13 to 19

“While the teens’ relationship is tested when details from Phoenix’s past coincide with Gretchen’s case, a host of diverse characters lend a hand and offer varying perspectives. [An] …eye-opening story. ” — Kirkus Reviews

WINTERSONG by S. Jae-Jones
Ages 12 to 18

Set at the turn of the 19th century, this richly imagined debut coming-of-age story spins a spellbinding tale perfect for fans of Labyrinth and THE DARKEST PART OF THE FOREST as a young woman searches for her sister who was kidnapped by the Goblin King. “There are plenty of nods to Labyrinth, but atmospherically, this first novel is most similar to another debut: Robin McKinley’s BEAUTY. …this is an exquisitely and lyrically crafted tale of longing, sibling loyalty, and the importance of women in a time when women were so often overlooked. Eerie, unsettling, and, above all, full of music.” — Booklist, starred review

 

WONDERFUL FEELS LIKE THIS by Sara Lövestam
Ages 12 to 18

Two starred reviews and a 2018 Best Fiction for Young Adults nominee! THE ELEGANCE OF THE HEDGEHOG meets THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER in this novel about a bullied teenager and an old man in a retirement home who bond over their mutual love of jazz music. “Sensitive and deeply moving: outstanding.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

 

A CROWN OF WISHES by Roshani Chokshi
Ages 13 to 18

In this second beautiful, lush fantasy from New York Times bestselling author Chokshi, Gauri, the princess of Bharata, must team up with her enemy kingdom’s prince Vikram to win the Tournament of Wishes—a competition held in a mythical city where the Lord of Wealth promises a wish to the victor. “Careful plotting, multiple viewpoints, high-stakes action, and a slow-burn relationship make this heady fantasy completely engrossing. A first pick for YA collections.” — School Library Journal, starred review

THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN by Roshani Chokshi (ages 13-19) is now available in trade paperback.

DREAM FOREVER by Kit Alloway (The Dream Walker Trilogy)
Ages 13 to 18

As the veil to the Dream becomes dangerously thin, Josh must stop it from tearing to save the world, in the conclusion to The Dream Walker Trilogy.

DREAMWORLD: Two Books in One: DREAMFIRE & DREAMFEVER by Kit Alloway (ages 13-18) is now available in trade paperback.

GIVE ME A K-I-L-L by R.L. Stine (Fear Street series #6)
Ages 14 to 18
Heather Wyatt just transferred from her old school, where she was a cheerleading star, and is eager to join the squad at Shadyside High. There’s only one other girl who stands in her way—rich, spoiled Devra Dalby, who is also trying out for the one open slot. The competition is anything but friendly—and it ends in murder.

FEAR STREET SUPER THRILLERS: NIGHTMARES by R.L. Stine (ages 12-18) is now available in trade paperback.

DEAR READER by Mary O’Connell
Ages 12 to 18
Gilmore Girls with magical realism! In this original, poignant modern-day take on Wuthering Heights, a high school senior searches for her teacher and meets a boy who may just be Heathcliff come to life. “The use of Wuthering Heights intensifies the impact of Flannery and Miss Sweeney’s corresponding journeys; even readers who haven’t read the classic will find significance in the parallels.” — Publishers Weekly

CARRY ON by Rainbow Rowell (ages 13-19) is now available in trade paperback.

SONGS ABOUT A GIRL by Chris Russell
Ages 12 to 18
Charlie Bloom is happiest behind her camera, taking pictures of her former classmate Olly Samson’s new band, Fire&Lights. Soon, they’re the hottest boy band in the country and Charlie becomes caught between Olly and Fire&Lights’ gorgeous but damaged frontman, Gabriel West. As the boys’ rivalry threatens to tear the band apart, Charlie stumbles on a secret about the band—and herself—hidden within the lyrics of their new #1 single. “Confronting the fickleness of fame and the damaging effects of rumors and harassment, Russell’s debut is highly relevant in an age of social media furors and the constant churn of news.” — Publishers Weekly

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The Giant 2016 Graphic Novel Roundup!

The saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words” and that’s certainly true of graphic novels. Thanks to comic book characters dominating pop culture, the format has been enjoying a boom and readers are coming to the medium in droves.

Publishers Weekly recently profiled graphic novel publisher Papercutz, which publishes between 50 and 60 books per year, mostly aimed at children ages 8–12. Their Super Genius imprint publishes books for teen readers and a new imprint called Charmz, aimed at pre-teen & early teen girls, will launch in May 2017.

Papercutz’s catalog includes bestselling licensed media properties, such as Barbie, Dennis the Menace, the Smurfs, Lego’s Ninjago and Bionicle series (though Lego moved the licenses to Little, Brown last year), a line of classic Disney graphic novels (DANTE’S INFERNO becomes MICKEY’S INFERNO, and X-MICKEY features X-Files-type supernatural escapades), as well as graphic novels based on a first-look deal with children’s TV network Nickelodeon.

Papercutz also rebooted select classics (WUTHERING HEIGHTS, THE JUNGLE, and THE INVISIBLE MAN to name a few) with artwork from acclaimed contemporary artists such as Rick Geary, Peter Kuper, and Gahan Wilson. Their first list in 2005 featured a manga-style graphic novel revival of the classic Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys adventure series, which are still in print and have together sold more than 800,000 copies.

Foreign imports are big, including France’s popular Ariol series by Emmanuel Guibert and Guillaume Bianco, and Antonello Dalena’s Ernest and Rebecca series. Italy’s bestselling prose series starring a time-traveling squirrel named Geronimo Stilton has done so well in the U.S. that Italy ran out of books and now Papercutz creates them.

Original graphic novels were an organic movement from the Geronimo Stilton books and Papercutz’s first original title was Deb Lucke’s THE LUNCH WITCH, followed by THE RED SHOES AND OTHER STORIES by Sandra Marrs and John Chalmers who create comics under the name Metaphrog. This November the house is publishing TRISH TRASH: Rollergirl of Mars, a YA SF graphic novel offering diversity—the book has a multiracial heroine—that was originally published in France but created by noted American cartoonist Jessica Abel.

The initial Charmz line (S’17) will simultaneously release the first four graphic novels in a planned series:
* CHLOE by Greg Tessier and Amandine, the story of a girl who is navigating life at a new school
* STITCHED by Mariah Huehner and Aaron Alexovich, a supernatural tale about a rag-doll girl who wakes up in a cemetery and must figure out who she is
* SWEETIES, based on Cathy Cassidy’s Chocolate Box Girls novels and adapted by Veronique Grisseaux and Anna Merli, about a girl who acquires four half-sisters when her father remarries
* THE GREAT COSMIC RACE by Amy Chu and Agnes Garbowska, a SF adventure story featuring an interstellar scavenger hunt, a smart girl, and an alien shapeshifter

Meanwhile, Library Journal offered their Graphic Novels Preview 2016 and noted many trends, starting with…
FEMALE CREATORS

Women writers and artists have historically been under­represented in graphic novels, but that seems poised to change based on the number of high-profile titles set for release in the coming year, ranging from humor to journalism to memoir and beyond. Among the most highly anticipated is Lynda Barry’s THE GREATEST OF MARLYS (Drawn & Quarterly, Aug.), a collection concentrating on one of best-selling Barry’s most beloved characters, eight-year-old Marlys. Through Marlys, Barry delves into the highs and lows of childhood and adolescence, capturing in unflinching detail the amusement and the horror of coming of age.

Lisa Hanawalt, perhaps best known as the designer behind the distinctive look of the animated Netflix series BoJack Horseman, moves fluidly between wit and pathos in HOT DOG TASTE TEST (Drawn & Quarterly, Jun.). While Hanawalt explores (and explodes) foodie culture in this new book, she also investigates relationships, identity issues, and more, all delivered in beautiful watercolors and an original and immensely funny voice.

Slightly less provocative but no less interesting an exploration of one artist’s quest for self-expression is Lucy Knisley’s memoir SOMETHING NEW: Tales from a Makeshift Bride (First Second, May), which details Knisley’s ventures in putting her own stamp on every facet of her wedding, from sewing her own dress to building the very barn in which the ceremony was held.

JOURNALISM AND NONFICTION

Riad Sattouf’s THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE, VOL. 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984–1985 (Holt, Sept.), the sequel to THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1978–1984, continues the author’s experiences moving among France, Libya, and Syria as a child. The second book finds the Sattoufs settled in Syria and struggling against obstacles both local and political.

Also exploring the Middle East, specifically the legacy of the Iraq War, is Sarah Glidden’s ROLLING BLACKOUTS (Drawn & Quarterly, Oct.), in which the author describes her travels as a journalist in Turkey, Iraq, and Syria.

FROM ABROAD

Graphic novels in translation continue to be massively popular, especially those originally published in Japanese. While the late Shigeru Mizuki is not the legend that [Osamu] Tezuka is, he is an important figure in his own right, and fans should be excited about Drawn & Quarterly’s THE BIRTH OF KITARO (May), the first of six volumes that will bring the Kitaro character to the United States for the first time. readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (3/10/14 Edition)

Hey hey, it’s time for another #BookBday! Today we celebrate:

BONES & ALL by Camille DeAngelis
A haunting coming-of-age story about a young outcast as she sets out on a journey to find her long-lost father, who can tell her why she does the bad thing she does—literally consuming anyone who gets too close to her. “Maren’s story also offers readers plenty to chew on: issues of feminism, family, and the very idea of flesh eating. What’s more, it’s a genuinely entertaining (though occasionally stomach-turning) story of a young ghoul’s coming of age. Delicious fun.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

A FIREPROOF HOME FOR THE BRIDE by Amy Scheibe
Scheibe’s “spectacular” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) sophomore effort explores the coming of age of a young Minnesota woman in the late 1950s. “Fans of Kathryn Stockett will identify strongly with the agonizing choices Emmy must make as ugly family secrets concerning racial hatred emerge. The author artfully folds fashion, cars, and music references into the story, and readers will delight in the surprise twist on the 1950s-style love affair that at first appears to be the perfect solution to the heroine’s woes.” — Library Journal
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