Articles tagged "Trump White House"

New Nonfiction in January 2018

Our nonfiction releases this month go beyond FIRE AND FURY (but Wolff’s book is YUGE…):

FIRE AND FURY: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff
Library holds are high and media is at a fever pitch for Wolff’s Trump White House tell-all.

ACHTUNG BABY: An American Mom on the German Art of Raising Self-Reliant Children by Sara Zaske
Watch Zaske on NBC’s “Today Show!” “America may be the land of the free, home of the brave, but it’s Germany whose children display independence and whose parents have the courage to take a step back… But unlike many parenting books, Zaske’s is not judgmental, prescriptive or didactic. For that, American parents may soon be saying Danke and sending ACHTUNG up the charts, too. ” — USA Today, ★★★ out of ★★★★

THE FINANCIAL DIET: A Total Beginner’s Guide to Getting Good with Money by Chelsea Fagan & Lauren Ver Hage
From The Financial Diet, the website inspiring over a million women each month: a beautiful, wry, practical guide to help you save, date, decorate and dream your way to your best financial life. “Bringing together experts from varying fields, including career planners, mortgage experts, financial bloggers, and money and relationship writers is par for the course. The mix of savvy, open, and mostly female perspectives on personal finance are what make this a winner.” — Booklist

WHEN TO JUMP: If the Job You Have Isn’t the Life You Want by Mike Lewis, with a foreword by Sheryl Sandberg
An inspirational book that lays out the “Jump Curve”—those fundamental four steps to finally, wholeheartedly, pursuing your dreams—using a wide variety of experiences from people who have jumped. With a foreword from Sheryl Sandberg and including the wisdom of Michael Lewis and Brandon Stanton, among many others. “An easy reading book of supportive encouragement to follow one’s dreams.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

FIRE AND FURY Frenzy!

Media is at a fever pitch for Michael Wolff’s FIRE AND FURY: Inside the Trump White House!

1st Serial Excerpt
New York Magazine (on stands 1/8, online now)

TV
1/5 The Today Show
1/7 Meet the Press
1/8 CBS This Morning
1/8 Morning Joe
1/8 MSNBC, Katy Tur
1/8 NBC Nightly News
1/8 MSNBC, Lawrence O’Donnell
1/8 Late Night with Stephen Colbert
1/8, Fox News, Ingraham Angle
1/9 MSNBC, Hardball with Chris Matthews
1/10 The View
1/10 CNN, Don Lemon Show
1/13 CNN, Michael Smerconish

RADIO
NPR’s “All Things Considered” — (1/5/181/7/18book review)

PRINT
Entertainment Weekly
USA Today
New York Times
Washington Post
San Francisco Chronicle
Los Angeles Times
New Yorker
Economist
Boston Globe

A message from Macmillan CEO John Sargent regarding FIRE AND FURY:

Last Thursday, shortly after 7:00 a.m., we received a demand from the President of the United States to “immediately cease and desist from any further publication, release or dissemination” of Michael Wolff’s FIRE AND FURY. On Thursday afternoon we responded with a short statement saying that we would publish the book, and we moved the pub date forward to the next day. Later today we will send our legal response to President Trump.

Our response is firm, as it has to be. I am writing you today to explain why this is a matter of great importance. It is about much more than FIRE AND FURY.

The president is free to call news “fake” and to blast the media. That goes against convention, but it is not unconstitutional. But a demand to cease and desist publication—a clear effort by the President of the United States to intimidate a publisher into halting publication of an important book on the workings of the government—is an attempt to achieve what is called prior restraint. That is something that no American court would order as it is flagrantly unconstitutional.

This is very clearly defined in Supreme Court case law, most prominently in the Pentagon Papers case. As Justice Hugo Black explained in his concurrence:

“Both the history and language of the First Amendment support the view that the press must be left free to publish news, whatever the source, without censorship, injunctions, or prior restraints. In the First Amendment, the Founding Fathers gave the free press the protection it must have to fulfill its essential role in our democracy. The press was to serve the governed, not the governors. The Government’s power to censor the press was abolished so that the press would remain forever free to censure the Government.”

Then there is Justice William Brennan’s opinion in The New York Times Co. v. Sullivan:

“Thus we consider this case against the background of a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.” readmoreremove

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