Articles tagged "THE WEEKENDERS"

PW Best Books of Summer 2017

PWSummer2017Publishers Weekly’s editors recently selected their Best Books of Summer 2017, including these seven Macmillan titles:
Staff Picks (full list)

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
“About that thing on the cover—is it a genetically modified bird-of-paradise? Some cousin of the odoriferous corpse flower? I was intrigued from the moment I saw it, as is Rachel, the postapocalyptic scavenger who finds the improbably sentient and mutable creature—who ‘smelled of beach reeds on lazy summer afternoons and, beneath the sea salt, of passionflowers’—while picking through the fur of the gargantuan flying bear that terrorizes her devastated city. And then things start to get weird.” — Carolyn Juris, features editor

ISADORA by Amelia Gray
“Gray’s most recent book, the story collection GUTSHOT, was weird as hell and as visceral as its title. Whose life would be better for her to fictionalize, then, than that of notorious mother of modern dance Isadora Duncan? An openly bisexual communist and atheist in an era that condemned all three, Duncan was famous for wearing long, flowing scarves even up until her death, when her scarf got caught in one of the axles of the car she was riding in. Flung from the vehicle, Duncan died of a broken neck—a tragic end that will surely make for a riveting finale in Gray’s novel.” — John Maher, assistant news editor

Fiction (full list)

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
Ginder takes family dysfunction to its hysterical limit in this joyously ribald novel about siblings Alice and Paul begrudgingly attending the lavish wedding of their half-sister, Eloise, in England. Lovesick Alice and Paul—both in doomed relationships—see Eloise as the snotty daughter of a rich dad, and Donna, their mother, as a coldhearted widow who ditched all remnants of their father after his death. During the boozy pre-wedding days, the resentment and secrets come tumbling out in outbursts and hilariously bad decisions. readmoreremove

ALA Annual 2016 – Sunday Events

Good morning, Orlando! Come to all of our terrific events and stop by the Macmillan Adult (Griffin Teen & Flatiron Books YA) booth #2115 for these great giveaways and signings.

Our friends at Drawn & Quarterly have graphic novel giveaways for you in booth #2263 and are presenting at a great graphic novel panel this afternoon.

Isn’t It Romantic? Panel with Mary Kay Andrews
8:30-10:00am
Orange County Convention Center | Room W101A
Add to your schedule

Sponsored by United for Libraries and moderated by Library Journal‘s Barbara Hoffert, this romance panel includes Mary Kay Andrews (THE WEEKENDERS) and three other authors. A book signing will follow the program.

YA Author Coffee Klatch
9:00-10:00am
Orange County Convention Center | Room W110
Ticketed event, space is limited

Enjoy coffee and meet with YALSA’s award winning authors, including Stephanie Garber (CARAVAL) and Meredith Russo (IF I WAS YOUR GIRL)! This informal coffee klatch provides an opportunity to meet authors who have appeared on one of YALSA’s six annual selected lists or have received one of YALSA’s five literary awards. Librarians will stay seated while authors rotate to different tables to talk about their books.

Onsite tickets are $25. Details and purchasing information available here.

Reads Like Fiction, Nonfiction You Can’t Put Down Panel with Ari Berman
10:30-11:30am
Orange County Convention Center | Room S330 A-B
Add to your schedule

Sponsored by United for Libraries and moderated by Library Journal‘s Barbara Hoffert, this nonfiction panel includes Ari Berman (GIVE US THE BALLOT) and three other authors. A book signing will follow the program. readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (5/24/16 Edition)

Oh what a lovely day for a #BookBday!

THE WEEKENDERS by Mary Kay Andrews
A June 2016 Indie Next pick! Riley Griggs’s island home on Belle Isle, NC is being foreclosed, and to make matters worse, her husband has vanished. She turns to her island friends for help and support, but each of them has their own secrets and the clock is ticking as the mystery deepens. “Andrews’ novels are the epitome of relaxing yet involving summer reads, and her latest is no exception.” — Booklist

THE CHILDREN by Ann Leary
“Leary writes about nutty, pedigreed New Englanders in this noirish comedy in which financial wrangling and emotional secrets are kept under wraps within a well-born Connecticut family until the arrival of an interloper from west of the Rockies. In this deeply satisfying novel about how unknowable people can be, intrigue builds with glass shards of dark humor toward an ending that is far from comic.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

Summer 2016 Indie Love

Terrific news: the ABA just announced their Summer/Fall 2016 Indies Introduce picks, the June 2016 Indie Next list, and the Summer 2016 Kids’ Indie Next List, including these seven Macmillan titles:
Summer/Fall 2016 Indies Introduce

A WHOLE LIFE by Robert Seethaler
Shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker International Prize! Set in the mid-twentieth century and told with beauty and tenderness, this is a story of man’s relationship with an ancient landscape, of the value of solitude, of the arrival of the modern world, and above all, of the moments that make us who we are.

CHILDREN OF THE NEW WORLD by Alexander Weinstein
“Director of The Martha’s Vineyard Institute of Creative Writing, Weinstein explains that ‘these stories arose from my growing concern over the effects that the internet age is having on our social, emotional, and psychological interactions.’ As a result, his stories look like SF—consider the childless couple living in a virtual-reality community whose child there is wiped out by a computer virus—but read like literary fiction. Calling all fans of Margaret Atwood and Emily St. John Mandel.” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

June 2016 Indie Next list

GRIEF IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS by Max Porter
Part novella, part polyphonic fable, part essay on grief, Porter’s extraordinary debut combines compassion and bravura style to dazzling effect. “Elegant, imaginative, and perfectly paced. A contribution to the literature of grief and to literature in general.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

css.php