Articles tagged "terror"

Fear Not – LJ Genre Spotlight on Horror

Terrified to recommend horror in your library? RAforAll.com / horror guru Becky Spratford‘s recent Library Journal genre spotlight on horror has you (and Macmillan) covered:

According to Melissa Ann Singer, senior editor at Tor/Forge, horror “becomes increasingly popular during times of societal unease. When people are worried that the world is going to pieces around them, when they have lost faith in the idea that things will soon (or even someday) be better than they now are…. The struggle of the horror novel is often the struggle to restore order and normality to a chaotic world, community, or family.”

Horror is also a genre in which critically acclaimed authors of color, such as Victor LaValle (THE BALLAD OF BLACK TOM), Linda Addison, Carmen Maria Machado (HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES), Silvia Moreno-Garcia (CERTAIN DARK THINGS; THE BEAUTIFUL ONES), and Stephen Graham Jones (MAPPING THE INTERIOR), are seeing critical and commercial success, offering inclusive tales that mine terror from both real-world racism and supernatural monsters.

BIG NAMES AND NEW VOICES

The conclusion of Glen Hirshberg’s “Motherless Children Trilogy,” NOTHING TO DEVOUR (Tor, Nov.), contemplates how far a mother—both a human mother and an undead one—will go for her children.

As Michael Homler, an editor at St. Martin’s, explains, the horror genre is ever evolving. “You can have a story that relies on victims getting killed in very painful ways or stories that are more psychological or ones that deal with race and/or religion. They can be literary; they can be commercial. It’s not a one-fits-all genre ­anymore.”

One sign that horror is becoming more mainstream is the willingness of major publishers to take a chance on newer voices. Beginning in July, Rio Youers’s supernatural thriller HALCYON (St. Martin’s) is set on an island oasis in the middle of Lake Ontario, where paradise comes at a horrifying price.

Come September, Brendan Deneen takes the mundane fear of adult responsibility and melds it with the haunted house trope in the fast-paced, chillingly twisted THE CHRYSALIS (Tor). readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (10/13/16 Edition)

Terror and thrills lurk behind the pages of these #ThrillerThursday picks:

A MOST NOVEL REVENGE by Ashley Weaver
In librarian Weaver’s third entry in the LibraryReads/Edgar-nominated charming mystery series set in 1930s England, Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into the investigation of a years-old murder by a salacious novelist in the English countryside. “Fascinating and stylish characters fill out a finely tuned traditional mystery.”
Publishers Weekly

THE GRAVEYARD APARTMENT by Mariko Koike
A terrifying tale of a young family who moves into an apartment building next to a graveyard, and the horrors that are unleashed upon them. “The haunting itself is well done and scary. The atmosphere and anticipation build perfectly to create an apartment building one would be quite hesitant to live in. Fans of classic ghost stories, such as THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE, will appreciate the subtle chills.” — Booklist readmoreremove

9/11: Twelve Years Later

Today is a painful day in our national history as we remember the tragic events of 9/11. There is a saying that "time heals all wounds" and while the truth of that statement may be up for debate, we can agree that time brings us insight and knowledge:

102 MINUTES: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers
by Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn

At 8:46 am on September 11, 2001, 14,000 people were inside the twin towers. Over the next 102 minutes, each would become part of a drama for the ages. Drawing on hundreds of interviews with rescuers and survivors, thousands of pages of oral histories, and countless phone, e-mail, and emergency radio transcripts, New York Times reporters Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn tell the story of September 11 from the inside looking out.

A HISTORY OF THE WORLD SINCE 9/11: Disaster, Deception and Destruction in the War on Terror
by Dominic Streatfeild

Acclaimed author and journalist Dominic Streatfeild traveled across the world for years in pursuit of answers for this stunning collapse of international law. The results of his search form the most fully realized study of the war on terror yet written. Piercing reportage blends with sobering human drama, woven into eight narratives of how our world went wrong after 9/11.

THE 9/11 REPORT: The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States
by Thomas H. Kean, Chair, and Lee Hamilton, Vice Chair; With analysis and reporting by The New York Times

A New York Times Notable Book of 2004, this complete edition of the 9/11 Report by the independent 9/11 Commission examines what happened that day, the lessons we learned and provides recommendations as to how we can prevent future attacks. 

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