Articles tagged "summer reading"

‘I Want The Pages To Turn’: Librarian Nancy Pearl’s Summer Reading List

Nancy Pearl continues to share her love of Renee Patrick‘s Lillian Frost and Edith Head mystery series. Today on NPR’s Morning Edition she started her Summer Reading List with DESIGN FOR DYING. You can read or listen to the complete Summer Reading List here.

Earlier this Spring, Nancy interviewed Rosemarie and Vince Keenan (the duo that is Renee Patrick) and had this to say about the series: “Lillian Frost is, I think, going to be everybody’s favorite.”

 

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (8/5/14 Edition)

Oh what a lovely day for a #BookBday! Today we celebrate:

DRIVING WITH THE TOP DOWN by Beth Harbison
In New York Times bestseller Harbison’s latest novel, two women set out on an antiquing road trip and get more than they bargained for when they pick up a third, stranded woman. “…it’s an enjoyable ride. Readers will want to pack this road-trip book in their beach bags.” — Booklist

A COLDER WAR by Charles Cumming
New York Times bestselling author Cumming’s masterful follow-up to A FOREIGN COUNTRY is an espionage tale that has two starred reviews and is an August Indie Next pick! “This fast-paced thriller is full of twists, turns, and surprises. With well-developed, complex characters and plenty of details about spycraft, it’s a perfect summer read for fans of Stella Rimington and John le Carré.” — Library Journal, starred review

THE KILLS by Richard House
We raved about this super-sized summer thriller longlisted for the Man Booker prize, which is actually four-books-in-one, and now your patrons will, too. “Part Olen Steinhauer spy thriller and part Roberto Bolaño art novel…THE KILLS is a work of intense artistic conviction and demands a serious commitment from its readers. They’ll be rewarded, even if the center of this dazzlingly large picture is elusive.” — Booklist, starred review

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A Super-Sized Summer Thriller: THE KILLS

If you attended Library Journal's “Day of Dialog” last week, you heard Picador publisher Stephen Morrison rave about Richard House’s THE KILLS. This epic thriller longlisted for the Man Booker prize is four books in one: Sutler, The Massive, The Kill, and The Hit. It begins with a man on the run and ends with a burned body, moving across continents, characters, and genres.

It's already received outstanding early praise and is showing up on Summer Reading Previews:

“In this remarkable, epic literary venture, a novel in four parts that was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, House explores the collateral damage of our capitalist way of going to war…. Part Olen Steinhauer spy thriller and part Roberto Bolaño art novel, with a huge cast of characters, many Middle Eastern settings, and a puzzle of a time-shifting plot, THE KILLS is a work of intense artistic conviction and demands a serious commitment from its readers. They’ll be rewarded, even if the center of this dazzlingly large picture is elusive.” Booklist, starred review

House’s thousand-plus-page novel is an intense, frustrating yet unforgettable tale…. He presents intriguing characters and enthralling scenarios, then leaves readers to make sense of it all. This huge undertaking is notable for its ambition, and it seduces with both its shortcomings and its accomplishments.”
Publishers Weekly, a May 5 Pick of the Week

Engrossing… House’s four-part, 1,000-page novel of corruption and murder is a heady page-turner. Already a hit in the U.K., THE KILLS trots the globe with professional killers and military contractors, and earns its comparisons to John le Carré with a healthy dose of political intrigue.” Time Out New York

Nerds, stay calm… Richard House’s Booker-long-listed, 1,000 page, hallucinogenic fictional account of the Iraq War and its aftermath, THE KILLS, is finally released in the States [August 5].” New York Magazine

Worried about toting around a brick of a galley? Fear not!
The e-galley is available on Edelweiss
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