Articles tagged "Spring 2018"

Happy National Library Week 2018!

It’s National Library Week, and what better way to celebrate than with some of our favorite books by librarians, about libraries, or starring librarians:

DEAR FAHRENHEIT 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks by Annie Spence
A September 2017 LibraryReads pick, Gen X-er librarian Spence’s book is a snarky, laugh-out-loud funny, deeply moving collection of love letters and break-up notes to the books in her life.

MURDER IN THE MANUSCRIPT ROOM: A 42nd Street Library Mystery by Con Lehane
Murder? In the library?! It happens in Lehane’s 42nd Street Library mystery series starring crime fiction curator Raymond Ambler.

THE BOOK OF SPECULATION by Erika Swyler
Swyler’s “whimsically dark debut” (Publishers Weekly) about a librarian who discovers a mysterious book that holds the key to a curse that has haunted his family of traveling circus performers for generations was a June 2015 LibraryReads pick and a Barnes & Noble 2015 Discover Great New Writers selection.

THE INFERNAL LIBRARY: On Dictators, the Books They Wrote, and Other Catastrophes of Literacy by Daniel Kalder
A compelling new history of “dictator literature” in the twentieth century, featuring the prose and poetry of Lenin, Hitler, Mao, and more.

MURDER AT THE BRIGHTWELL by Ashley Weaver
Librarian Weaver’s charming Golden Age debut introduced married couple/amateur sleuths Amory and Milo Ames and was an October 2014 LibraryReads pick. Look for book 5 in the series, AN ACT OF VILLAINY, coming this September 2018.

Plus, Patience & Fortitude are roaring about our New York Public Library Spring 2018 staff picks!

STARFIRE: A Red Peace by Spencer Ellsworth

BAKING WITH KAFKA by Tom Gauld

DON’T GO by Lisa Scottoline

GHOSTS OF THE TSUNAMI: Death and Life in Japan’s Disaster Zone by Richard Lloyd Parry

THE BUTCHERING ART: Joseph Lister’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine by Lindsey Fitzharris

THE ENGLISH WIFE by Lauren Willig

A CROWN OF WISHES by Roshani Chokshi (Young Adult)

Buzzfeed’s “Amazing New Books You Need To Read This Spring” 2018

Poetry, essays, short stories… these Buzzfeed-recommended books will spring off your library’s shelves!

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
US Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith returns with WADE IN THE WATER, a new collection of poems that feels both timely and timeless. In lines that are as lyrical as they are wise (and so poignant you’ll want to write them down immediately), Smith makes connections between the current state of American culture and its history — police brutality, slavery, immigration, the Civil War, the Declaration of Independence (which she turns into an erasure poem). What does it mean to be an American, to be a woman in a society still dominated by men? Smith captures memories, found language, music, and the voices of the past to get to the beating heart of our nation today — and you’ll feel it in every fiber of your being while reading.

A LUCKY MAN by Jamel Brinkley
The nine stories in Jamel Brinkley’s collection A LUCKY MAN are about black men grappling with their place in the world, their pasts, their friendships, and their families — boys coming of age and encountering firsthand how privilege is tied to race and class, brothers navigating strained relationships, parents and children disappointing each other. Brinkley shows both the great beauty and ugliness of humanity — but always with empathy — and captures the ways in which our world is defined and divided by power. A LUCKY MAN so real and alive, much like its characters, that you’ll be eager to read whatever Brinkley writes next.

EYE LEVEL by Jenny Xie
US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Hererra chose Jenny Xie as the winner of the Academy of American Poets’ 2017 Walt Whitman Award, and it’s easy to see why in her debut collection EYE LEVEL. Xie’s poems take us on a journey to new places (Vietnam, Cambodia, even a Greek island) in such vivid detail that you’ll feel as if you really traveled, as well as to new questions about immigration, identity, and loneliness. How do we really find home? What do we lose when we leave? Reading EYE LEVEL feels like taking a trip with someone who truly sees you, and the world, as it is. readmoreremove

Library Journal’s Best Spring/Summer 2018 Debut Novels

Library Journal pre-pub buzz maven Barbara Hoffert shared her picks for “spring and summer titles you should have on your radar,” including these four Macmillan debuts:

SEMIOSIS by Sue Burke
Colonists escaping an environmentally imploding Earth make an emergency landing on a planet they weren’t aiming for, and generations of humans grow up there, evolving as they adapt to a new ­environment. “Extraordinary.” (LJ 1/18)

THE ITALIAN PARTY by Christina Lynch
In 1956, newlyweds Michael and Scottie Messina arrive in Italy, where Michael will be working for the CIA. His ambitions and their not-government-approved sexuality complicate matters. “Effervescent as spumante; spot-on social commentary.” (LJ 11/1/17)

GIRLS BURN BRIGHTER by Shobha Rao
Allied as outsiders, two girls in India become fast friends but are separated by tragedy, with Poornima finally traveling all the way to Seattle to renew her bond with Savitha. “This tale of sacrifice, exploitation, and reclamation is not to be missed.” (LJ 1/18) readmoreremove

PW’s Writers to Watch Spring 2018: Anticipated Debuts

Publishers Weekly‘s most anticipated debuts of Spring 2018 include these three Macmillan standouts:

PEACH by Emma Glass
Emma Glass began writing her debut novel, PEACH (Bloomsbury, out now), about a young woman who struggles to resume ordinary life after being assaulted, a little less than a decade ago while she was studying creative writing at the University of Kent in the U.K. For her final assignment, Glass had to write the first 4,000 words of a novel. The prompt was open-ended, but the program, she says, put special emphasis on plot-driven, commercially viable narratives, which she had little affinity for.

“I’ve never been particularly good at coming up with stories,” Glass says. In her frustration, and with the deadline approaching, she put on some music and started simply writing “words”—not even sentences. “I was surprised at what came out,” Glass, now 30, says. “It felt like it was something different.”

Glass, who is at work on her second novel, has kept her job as a nurse. People sometimes ask her whether PEACH, with its visceral bodily imagery, was influenced by her career in medicine. The answer is no. “That kind of grotesque violence, I’m afraid, is all my own,” she says.

THE TRANSITION by Luke Kennard
When the British poet Luke Kennard was writing his first novel, THE TRANSITION (FSG, out now), he imagined it taking place in the very near future. But novels take years to write, and the future arrives more quickly than we expect. Now, the themes at the center of the book—millennial hopelessness, financial precariousness—feel scarily current. “A lot of things it explores have been superseded by reality,” Kennard jokes. readmoreremove

Sign Up Now: Booklist Spring 2018 YA Webinar

Calling all Young Adult & Teen Services librarians! Sign up now for Booklist‘s Spring 2018 YA Announcements webinar on Tuesday, March 6 at 1:00pm Central.

Emily Day (of “Day’s YA” fame!) will give you a sneak peek of the best forthcoming titles from Flatiron YA and Wednesday Books.

Click here to RSVP. See you there!

LJ Spring 2018 Editors’ Picks

Library Journal‘s editors revealed their Spring 2018 picks, including these five titles:

Kate DiGirolomo, SELF-e Community Coordinator
I’d like to don my metaphorical hipster glasses for a second to proclaim that I knew about L. Penelope’s SONG OF BLOOD & STONE (St. Martin’s, May) before she got the book deal. Her captivating “Earthsinger” series was part of LJ’s SELF-e program, featured among the best fiction the indie world has to offer. In this first installment, magical outcast Jasminda and spy Jack embark on a journey, unexpectedly finding love while trying to save their world from invasion. We’ll certainly miss this one in SELF-e land, but it’ll be exciting to see it reach new audiences—and deservedly so!

Rounding out my novel choices is Shobha Rao’s GIRLS BURN BRIGHTER (Flatiron: Macmillan, Mar.; LJ 1/18). It first caught my attention with its incredible title and then kept it with the two honest, admirable heroines Rao has created. Poornima and Savitha, young women who can see beyond the constraints of their Indian village, will ignite a spark of hope in readers.

Liz French, Senior Editor
And then there’s Weegee, aka Arthur Fellig (1899–1968), the outsize personality and street photographer who prowled the alleys of midcentury Gotham, often scooping the cops at crime scenes and documenting nightlife. New York magazine senior editor Christopher Bonanos tells his story in FLASH: The Making of Weegee the Famous (Holt, Mar.). Thirty of his photographs enhance the work.

Stephanie Sendaula, Associate Editor
Another fascinating book in the same vein is Bryan Mealer’s THE KINGS OF BIG SPRING: God, Oil, and One Family’s Search for the American Dream (Flatiron: Macmillan, Feb.; LJ 2/1/18). After telling myself that I would only read a few pages, I read the entire book in one sitting, engrossed by the fortunes and misfortunes of patriarch John Lewis Mealer and his children and grandchildren, from Georgia to Texas, California to Arizona. Bryan, his grandson, interviews numerous relatives to create a history–turned–collective biography about what it costs personally, professionally, and spiritually to pursue the American Dream. readmoreremove

PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018

Publishers Weekly‘s “Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018” include these 8 Macmillan titles:
Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror

THE MERRY SPINSTER by Mallory Ortberg
Ortberg’s twisted variations on popular fairy tales and children’s books are daring and skillful, and this outstanding collection of them brims with satirical horror.

WITCHMARK by C.L. Polk
This stellar debut, set in an alternate early 20th century, is an innovative mix of class struggle, magic, and war that marks Polk as a writer to watch.

Poetry

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
The current U.S. poet laureate challenges the nature of citizenship, motherhood, and what it means to be an artist in a culture mediated by wealth, men, and violence.

Comics/Graphic Novels

BLAME THIS ON THE BOOGIE by Rina Ayuyang
Ayuyang chronicles the real-life adventures of a Filipino-American girl born in the decade of disco who escapes life’s hardships and mundanity through the genre’s feel-good song-and-dance numbers.

Memoir

EAT THE APPLE by Matt Young
This bold memoir explores “how war transformed [Young] from a confused teenager into a dangerous and damaged man.”

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
The former FBI director shares for the first time the details of his career in government during the past two decades. readmoreremove

PW’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction Picks

Publishers Weekly‘s Spring 2018 literary fiction picks include 8 titles from Macmillan:
Top 10

THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
Hannah’s novel, starred by PW, follows the Allbright family, who barely make ends meet, as they move from 1974 Seattle to the untamed wilderness of Kaneq, Alaska, to claim a parcel of land left to the father by a slain Army buddy.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Following OUTLINE and TRANSIT, this novel completes Cusk’s trilogy: a woman writer visits a Europe in flux, where questions of personal and political identity rise to the surface.

THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat
Tamirat’s debut is a coming-of-age story about a girl in Boston’s tightly knit Ethiopian community who falls under the influence of a charismatic hustler. The novel received a starred PW review. readmoreremove

Spring 2018 Catalogs Now Available Online!

Exciting news: Macmillan’s Spring 2018 catalogs are now available on Edelweiss!

Take your time to peruse all of the excellent new Macmillan books coming out early next year. As always, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us if you have questions.

Click here for the full list of Macmillan Spring 2018 catalogs available by publisher.

 

 

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