Articles tagged "Some Girls Are"

Banned Books Week 2018

Did you know that ELEANOR & PARK, SOME GIRLS ARE, and THIS ONE SUMMER have all been banned or challenged? Censorship is happening and it is infringing on the right of readers.

Good thing librarians fight for our fREADdom! Banned Books Week (Sept 23-29) is happening now and it’s the perfect time to re-read and recommend all your favorite banned and challenged books.

Here are resources for librarians and free downloadable art from Banned Books Week to help spread the word. The ALA also has lots of great resources on Banned Books Week, including lists of frequently challenged booksbanned/challenged classicstop 10 frequently challenged books, the 100 most frequently challenged books by decade, and MORE free downloadable materials.

Share your love of banned books all week long!

Take a photo of your Banned Books Week display or a selfie with your favorite banned book and tweet it out to @BannedBooksWeek with the hashtags #bannedbooksweek and #ireadbannedbooks.

Check out BannedBooksWeek.org for more information on how you can help support authors whose books have been banned or challenged. readmoreremove

Banned Books Week 2015

BannedBooksWeek2015-250x324Happy Banned Books Week! This year’s theme is Young Adult fiction, and what better time to have Courtney Summers’s SOME GIRLS ARE challenged?!

A South Carolina high school pulled the book off its freshman summer reading list after a parent complained about the content; the response from librarians and readers across the country against this action was immediate and powerful.

BookRiot editor and former librarian Kelly Jensen spearheaded an online donation drive for close to 1,000 copies of SOME GIRLS ARE to be sent to the Charleston County Public Library to be given for free to any teen who wishes to read the book. The National Coalition Against Censorship and other national groups voiced their opposition and media coverage followed at ABC News 4 and WSCS Live 5 News (Charleston, SC), The Post and Courier, School Library Journal, BookRiot, and Hello Giggles.
Then there’s Courtney Summers’s response:

SOME GIRLS ARE is a confrontational no-holds-barred look at young adolescent life. It’s about bullying–something most teenagers witness, experience or perpetuate in their school careers. It’s about a highly toxic culture that fosters aggression between girls. The novel explores the consequences of hurting people and asks us to consider the impact our actions have on others. It’s about picking up the pieces of our mistakes and bettering ourselves. It’s about forgiveness.

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“It was selected as an ALA/YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults title and a Top Ten Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers. It was also an Ontario Library Association Forest of Reading White Pine nominee, Canada’s largest recreational reading program. As part of the program, the book was available to teen readers in over 3,000 schools nationwide.

“I have made a career out of writing young adult fiction about difficult topics. It’s my deepest hope teenagers living the harsh realities I write about–because they do live them–will read my books and feel less alone. It’s incredibly powerful to see yourself in a book when you’re struggling. Not only that, but gritty, realistic YA novels offer a safe space for teen readers to process what is happening in the world around them, even if they never directly experience what they’re reading about. This, in turn, creates a space for teens and the adults in their lives to discuss these topics. Fiction also helps us to consider lives outside of our own, which in turn makes us more empathetic toward others.

“We don’t protect teen readers by denying the realities many of them are faced with. Often, in doing so, we deny them a lifeline.”

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Well said, Courtney. Here are some other frequently challenged and banned YA titles and adult books with teen appeal we recommend revisiting throughout the week:

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We’re all about ALL THE RAGE!

We’re hopelessly devoted to Courtney Summers. We’ve been fans of her raw and realistic teen fiction since the very beginning. We were heartbroken by “Perfect” Parker Fadley’s shame spiral in CRACKED UP TO BE, watched the Fearsome Fivesome crumble in SOME GIRLS ARE, mourned the loss of Eddie Reeves’s father in FALL FOR ANYTHING and wondered about the end of the world in THIS IS NOT A TEST.
And now, her hardcover debut, ALL THE RAGE, is finally available on Edelweiss. And O-M-G!

We’re not the only ones going crazy for this breakout YA novel—Early Word YA Galley Chatter and Head of Youth Services Librarian at Los Alamos County Library System, NM, Angie Manfredi has this to say:

“In ALL THE RAGE, Courtney Summers gives a voice to countless teenage girls our society has turned our back on—the ones so many of us try to ignore. With a confident, fearless, incisive, and even compassionate heart, Summers allows these girls to be seen and heard again. A YA game changer along the lines of Laurie Halse Anderson’s SPEAK, this is a work of great power and resonance and I believe it can give a new generation of teen girls a voice.”

WOW. So don’t wait—get whitelisted on Edelweiss and find out why we’re all about ALL THE RAGE.

On #YASaves: Darkness in YA More Help Than Harm

I'm sure I'm not the only one out there who logged into Twitter over the weekend to find a new trend dominating the bookish conversations: #YASaves. I don't read many Young Adult novels, but I went ahead and read the desputed article on how YA has become too dark, I also read a rebuttal or two, then I decided to read some YA.

Back when I was reading YA regularly, I'll admit, it wasn't contemporary. I was reading YA of the wizards, knights, and spaceships variety. But this time I picked up something from 21st Century Earth, Courtney Summers' FALL FOR ANYTHING, in which our protagonist, Eddie, is coping (and sometimes not coping) with her father's suicide. Is this story dark? Yes. Is it written with care, sensitivity, honesty, and confidence that things can get better for Eddie? Absolutely. 

As I read, three things became very clear to me very fast:

1. It's easy to forget that the day-to-day life of a teenager is erratic, immediate, frustrating, and thrilling without additional adversity.

2. Tragedy and abuse are isolating. Only fellow teenagers can truly empathize with highly-visceral reactions to difficulty, but they may not know how to empathize with tragedy. Books offer a non confrontational form of support, normality, and a way to see past the confusion to the healing.

3. YA books dealing with issues like grief, self-harm, substance abuse, domestic violence, bullying and so on are invaluable tools for adults trying to understand someone younger dealing with difficult issues.

Sure, sometimes in YA the death of a parent is replaced with the death of a wizard guardian or substance abuse is told as addiction to time-traveling, but regardless of genre, the issues and the emotions are the same. These stories offer empathy, compassion, understanding, and shed light on difficult issues.

If you feel inspired to do some reading and decide for yourself whether dark issues in YA are helpful or harmful, I have a few authors to suggest:

Courtney Summers (FALL FOR ANYTHING, SOME GIRLS ARE, CRACKED UP TO BE)
Carol Lynch Williams (THE CHOSEN ONE, MILES FROM ORDINARY)
Rachel DeWoskin (BIG GIRL SMALL)

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2011 YALSA award winning titles – Macmillan ROCKS!

I am pleased to announce that the following 2 titles received the 2011 Alex Award from the Young Adult Library Services Association:


Alden Bell's, The Reapers are the Angels & Steve Hamilton's The Lock Artist.


AND


Courtney Summers' Some Girls Are made the 2011 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers TOP TEN list and the Best Fiction for Young Adults list.

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