Articles tagged "short stories"

Sneak Peek: July 2018 Indie Next List

Four Macmillan titles made the July 2018 Indie Next List!

BRING ME BACK by B.A. Paris
Also available in audio
A June 2018 LibraryReads pick with two starred reviews! The new thriller from the bestselling author of BEHIND CLOSED DOORS about a woman who vanished and may have reappeared to haunt her old lover. “[An] outstanding Hitchcockian thriller… Paris plays fair with the reader as she builds to a satisfying resolution. Fans of intelligent psychological suspense will be richly rewarded.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
An exuberant and wise multigenerational debut novel about the complicated lives and loves of people working in everyone’s favorite Chinese restaurant. “Li vividly depicts the lives of her characters and gives the narrative a few satisfying turns, resulting in a memorable debut. ” — Publishers Weekly

IF YOU SEE ME, DON’T SAY HI by Neel Patel
A bravura debut story collection in the vein of Aziz Ansari and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, about love, family, success, and the experience of being brown in America today. “A melancholic pleasure with a sense of humor.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (6/5/18 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to these top-notch new releases!

HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
Also available in audio
A June 2018 LibraryReads pick with THREE starred reviews! Hilarious and poignant, the new adventures of Kate Reddy, the beleaguered heroine of Allison Pearson’s groundbreaking New York Times bestseller I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT. “Tackling sexism, growing older, and understanding one’s needs when catering to those of so many others, Pearson writes realism with all the fun of escapism.” — Booklist, starred review

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
One of Publishers Weekly’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction picks with THREE starred reviews! The critically acclaimed author of OUTLINE and TRANSIT, completes her “stunning” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) trilogy with a finale that examines the relationship between pain and honor, and investigates the moral nature of success as a precept of both art and living. “Brilliantly accomplished and uncompromisingly dark.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

TREEBORNE by Caleb Johnson
THREE starred reviews! “Using language rich as mulch, debut author Johnson tells the superb saga of three generations of Treebornes, who live near the town of Elberta in the southern reaches of Georgia. Sentence by loamy sentence, this gifted author digs up corpses and upends trees to create a place laden with magic and memory.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review and editor’s pick readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (5/1/18 Edition)

Look at these outstanding new releases, perfect for every patron:

MOTHERHOOD by Sheila Heti
A May 2018 Indie Next pick and one of PW’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction picks with two starred reviews! “The subject of the new novel from Heti is neither birth nor child-rearing, but the question of whether to want a child, which the unnamed narrator calls ‘the greatest secret I keep from myself’…. This lively, exhilaratingly smart, and deliberately, appropriately frustrating affair asks difficult questions about women’s responsibilities and desires, and society’s expectations.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

SONG OF BLOOD & STONE: Earthsinger Chronicles, Book One by L. Penelope
A Library Journal Spring 2018 Editors’ Pick with two starred reviews! The incredible first book in the Earthsinger series—a treacherous, thrilling, epic historical fantasy drawing on Native American and African mythologies about an outcast drawn into a war between two powerful rulers. “This debut…shines a bright light into epic fantasy. Battle-scarred lands and peoples, ancient powers at war, star-crossed loves and hints of racial and refugee themes give this a solid place on library shelves.” — Library Journal, starred review readmoreremove

For Your Consideration: July 2018 LibraryReads Titles

Download, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the July 2018 LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due May 20! Click here for the full list of 2018 deadlines.

BABY TEETH by Zoje Stage
Also available in audio
THREE starred reviews and Zoje is on the cover of Library Journal’s mystery issue!WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN meets GONE GIRL meets THE OMEN. Interested? That might be the best way to describe Zoje Stage’s highly anticipated debut novel, BABY TEETH…a twisty, delirious read that will constantly question your sympathies for the two characters as their bond continues to crumble.” — Entertainment Weekly

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

STAY HIDDEN by Paul Doiron
Also available in audio
A supposed hunting accident becomes a dangerously complicated murder investigation in this intricately-plotted new thriller featuring Maine Game Warden Mike Bowditch. “The plot is complex, and the action intense, made all the more so by forbidding terrain. The extraordinary sense of place makes this Doiron’s strongest novel yet.” — Booklist, starred review

Available on NetGalley. To be pre-approved for an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “Stay Hidden.”*

A GATHERING OF SECRETS by Linda Castillo
Also available in audio
“In this next in the popular Amish mystery series featuring Chief of Police Kate Burkholder, a stately old barn burns to ash with 18-year-old Daniel Gingerich inside. It’s no accident, and Kate soon learns that Daniel wasn’t the sweet, self-effacing guy he appeared to be, with plenty of people having reason to want him dead. Major promotion.” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

I SEE LIFE THROUGH ROSÉ COLORED GLASSES: True Stories and Confessions by Lisa Scottoline & Francesca Serritella
Also available in audio
“Novelist Scottoline and daughter Serritella team up for the eighth in a series of entertaining mother-daughter humor books, combining entries in their ‘Chick Wit’ column for the Philadelphia Inquirer and new material. This summer beach read—which is indeed ‘like a glass of rosé, between two covers’—is sure to cheer readers spanning the generations but will be of particular appeal to mothers and daughters.” — Publishers Weekly

Available on NetGalley. To be pre-approved for an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “Rose Colored Glasses.”*

CITY OF DEVILS: The Two Men Who Ruled the Underworld of Old Shanghai by Paul French
Two starred reviews! “Drugs, gambling, vice, and banditry power China’s seaport mecca in this rollicking true crime saga. French’s two-fisted prose—‘When Boobee hops on a bar stool, lights an opium-tipped cigarette, and crosses her long legs, the sound of a dozen tensed-up male necks swinging round is like… a gunshot’—makes this deep noir history unforgettable.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Gerald Murnane

Happy Friday! We’ve got a double-dose of Gerald Murnane for our #FridayReads:

BORDER DISTRICTS by Gerald Murnane
A bittersweet farewell to the world and the word by the Australian master. “An old man ruminates on landscapes and houses, authors and religion, colored glass and memory in this drifting quasi-fiction. A fascinating, provocative…read; the stylistic tics may grow tiresome but Murnane’s intriguing ideas and oblique angles rarely do.” Kirkus Reviews, starred review
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Buzzfeed’s “Amazing New Books You Need To Read This Spring” 2018

Poetry, essays, short stories… these Buzzfeed-recommended books will spring off your library’s shelves!

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
US Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith returns with WADE IN THE WATER, a new collection of poems that feels both timely and timeless. In lines that are as lyrical as they are wise (and so poignant you’ll want to write them down immediately), Smith makes connections between the current state of American culture and its history — police brutality, slavery, immigration, the Civil War, the Declaration of Independence (which she turns into an erasure poem). What does it mean to be an American, to be a woman in a society still dominated by men? Smith captures memories, found language, music, and the voices of the past to get to the beating heart of our nation today — and you’ll feel it in every fiber of your being while reading.

A LUCKY MAN by Jamel Brinkley
The nine stories in Jamel Brinkley’s collection A LUCKY MAN are about black men grappling with their place in the world, their pasts, their friendships, and their families — boys coming of age and encountering firsthand how privilege is tied to race and class, brothers navigating strained relationships, parents and children disappointing each other. Brinkley shows both the great beauty and ugliness of humanity — but always with empathy — and captures the ways in which our world is defined and divided by power. A LUCKY MAN so real and alive, much like its characters, that you’ll be eager to read whatever Brinkley writes next.

EYE LEVEL by Jenny Xie
US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Hererra chose Jenny Xie as the winner of the Academy of American Poets’ 2017 Walt Whitman Award, and it’s easy to see why in her debut collection EYE LEVEL. Xie’s poems take us on a journey to new places (Vietnam, Cambodia, even a Greek island) in such vivid detail that you’ll feel as if you really traveled, as well as to new questions about immigration, identity, and loneliness. How do we really find home? What do we lose when we leave? Reading EYE LEVEL feels like taking a trip with someone who truly sees you, and the world, as it is. readmoreremove

Our #LibFaves17 Picks

We enjoyed seeing so many of you participate in #LibFaves17 (thanks for making Jane Harper’s THE DRY an official 2017 Top Ten pick!).

Now here are OUR #LibFaves17 picks (aka our 2017 “Recommended Reads” from the newsletter):

Talia

THE MAP THAT LEADS TO YOU by J.P. Monninger
Also available in audio
Finally, a book version of that romantic trilogy of films that Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy collaborated on… And most especially reminiscent of BEFORE SUNRISE. I’m also fondly reminded of the first boy that I ever fell in love with, his name was Lenny Grant, we were both sixteen and attending a summer writing program in Boston. It may as well have been Europe…

THE STANDARD GRAND by Jay Baron Nicorvo
THE STANDARD GRAND is reminiscent of Frank Bill’s CRIMES IN SOUTHERN INDIANA in terms of its grittiness and the ragtag group of misfit anti-heroes trying to survive in the wilderness. And I’ve always loved reading novels that were written in a sort of rushed exuberance—as if the author just had to share his or her story…

KNIFE CREEK by Paul Doiron
Also available in audio
Paul Doiron’s Mike Bowditch (my favorite bad-ass—does everything on his own terms—Maine game warden) is back for more! In KNIFE CREEK, Mike and his girlfriend Stacy (a bit of a rogue operator herself) are hunting wild rampaging boars that are destroying their beautiful town and surrounding environs. During the hunt, the couple discovers a dead infant in a shallow grave. Mike is a game warden but he’s got the instincts of a seasoned detective and must find out who committed such a gruesome deed. He just can’t help himself. And I love him for that. A home explosion that nearly kills him, an encounter with two very strange “sisters” wearing matching red wigs—one of whom may or may not be a long-dead co-ed (or was she kidnapped?), and a small town that’s full of suspects… Mike’s clearly on to something here, but what?

FRESH COMPLAINT by Jeffrey Eugenides
Also available in audio
I’ve always loved short story collections (see Shobha Rao’s AN UNRESTORED WOMAN, Tom Perrotta’s NINE INCHES, David Bezmozgis’ NATASHA, Helen Ellis’ AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE, Lauren Holmes’ BARBARA THE SLUT, James Franco’s PALO ALTO). The intensity of dipping into a life, briefly, and popping right out of it again… Of meeting someone at a particularly vulnerable and strangely fascinating moment in their lives… Of sharing that moment with them but never fully knowing when it began or where it ends is particularly exciting to me. And in Jeffrey Eugenides’ new short story collection FRESH COMPLAINT, meditations abound on life at every stage and at its most banally bizarre moments. Readers are thrown into a period of post-college idealism (and dysentery), mid-life pregnancies (and an ensuing tragicomedy), rebuilding after failure, sex studies in the jungle (and leaving one’s inhibitions behind), the worshiping of a musical instrument, a green card marriage and finally death. And we are treated to it all with a healthy dose of slightly off-beat characters.

THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Also available in audio
There’s a marketing specialist at Macmillan whose taste in books I trust completely. I will not name names, because she is my secret “book Santa” and I refuse to share her. Since 2004, she has very occasionally sent me manuscripts to read. She has always chosen a book that I end up loving, hating deeply, or at the very least ends up inciting an incredibly visceral reaction. I won’t list the favorites she’s sent, because her identity will most certainly be revealed. And now let’s talk about her latest manuscript, THE WIFE BETWEEN US. There is no train. There is no girl. There is drinking (all good stories need alcohol, right?). There is an unreliable narrator (but those are the most intriguing, aren’t they?). There is a handsome husband (marriages are always fascinating to dissect, good or bad!). There is “another” woman (a thriller always needs a mysterious “other,” right?). And that’s all I can tell you. Read it. And let’s talk about that ending.

INDECENT by Corinne Sullivan
An insecure shy teacher’s apprentice barely out of college at an all boys boarding school is tempted by the popular boy… He’s brash, he’s arrogant, he’s the leader of the pack… But, will she do what’s right? I can’t help but think of the only younger man that I ever dated. During the summer before I went off to college I dated a rising senior. He wore Polo cologne, had long hair and we spent most of that summer in hidden corners and behind closed doors. But it’s not the same, is it? readmoreremove

NYTBR’s 10 Best Books of 2017 & Editor’s Picks

HOORAY! Two nonfiction titles made the New York Times Book Review‘s “10 Best Books of 2017” list and five more (plus two honorable mentions) are New York Times Critics’ Top Books of 2017!

LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.
A former public defender in Washington, Forman has written a masterly account of how a generation of black officials, beginning in the 1970s, wrestled with recurring crises of violence and drug use in the nation’s capital. What started out as an effort to assert the value of black lives turned into an embrace of tough-on-crime policies — with devastating consequences for the very communities those officials had promised to represent. Forman argues that dismantling the American system of mass incarceration will require a new understanding of justice, one that emphasizes accountability instead of vengeance.

PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
Fraser’s biography of the author of “Little House on the Prairie” and other beloved books about her childhood during the era of westward migration captures the details of a life — and an improbable, iconic literary career — that has been expertly veiled by fiction. Exhaustively researched and passionately written, this book refreshes and revitalizes our understanding of Western American history, giving space to the stories of Native Americans displaced from the tribal lands by white settlers like the Ingalls family as well as to the travails of homesteaders, farmers and everyone else who rushed to the West to extract its often elusive riches. Ending with a savvy analysis of the 20th-century turn toward right-wing politics taken by Wilder and her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, Fraser offers a remarkably wide-angle view of how national myths are shaped.

Dwight Garner

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Library Journal’s Best Books of 2017

Library Journal’s Best Books of 2017 lists include 12 Macmillan titles:

Top Ten Books of 2017 (full list)
THE NINTH HOUR by Alice McDermott

Mystery (full list)
GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny

SF/Fantasy (full list)
DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES by Seanan McGuire
AUTONOMOUS by Annalee Newitz

Thrillers (full list)
THE LOST ORDER by Steve Berry
THE SABOTEUR by Andrew Gross readmoreremove

Winter/Spring 2018 Indies Introduce & Kids’ Indie Next List Titles

The American Booksellers Association announced their Winter/Spring 2018 Indies Introduce selections (honoring the top upcoming debuts publishing between January and June 2018) and the Winter 2017–2018 Kids’ Indie Next List, including:

Winter/Spring 2018 Indies Introduce Fiction
A LUCKY MAN: Stories by Jamel Brinkley
Available May 1, 2018
In the nine expansive, searching stories of A LUCKY MAN, fathers and sons attempt to salvage relationships with friends and family members and confront mistakes made in the past.

Winter/Spring 2018 Indies Introduce Nonfiction
MOTHERS OF SPARTA: A Memoir in Pieces by Dawn Davies
Available January 30, 2018
Discovered by Michael Ondaatje, Davies’ dazzling literary memoir has shades of Mary Karr, Anne Lamott, and Jenny Lawson as she examines motherhood and what it’s like to be a woman trying to carve a place for herself in the world, no matter how unyielding the rock can be.

Winter/Spring 2018 Indies Introduce Young Adult AND Winter 2017–2018 Kids’ Indie Next List
THE HAZEL WOOD by Melissa Albert
Available January 30, 2018
FOUR STARRED REVIEWS!!! “A ferocious young woman is drawn into her grandmother’s sinister fairy-tale realm in this pitch-black fantasy debut. Not everybody lives, and certainly not ‘happily ever after’—but within all the grisly darkness, Alice’s fierce integrity and hard-won self-knowledge shine unquenched.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

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