Articles tagged "Sherlock Holmes"

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (6/8/17 Edition)

Happy #ThrillerThursday! First, big congrats to our nominees on the 2017 CWA Dagger longlists:

The CWA Gold Dagger
THE DRY by Jane Harper

The Ian Fleming Steel Dagger
MOSKVA by Jack Grimwood
THE ONE MAN by Andrew Gross
REDEMPTION ROAD by John Hart

The John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger
WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW by JoAnn Chaney
GOOD ME BAD ME by Ali Land

The Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction
ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes by Michael Sims

The CWA Endeavour Historical Dagger
BY GASLIGHT by Steven Price

Now on to this week’s new books!

HE SAID/SHE SAID by Erin Kelly
Two starred reviews! On the eve of a solar eclipse, a couple forced into hiding discovers that they can no longer run from their past in this taut psychological suspense novel. “HE SAID/SHE SAID is a thriller to savor, and should be one of the highlights of the summer.” — Associated Press

WOLF ON A STRING by Benjamin Black
Bestselling author Black turns his eye to sixteenth century Prague and a story of murder, magic and the dark art of wielding extraordinary power. “Black displays his mastery of yet another mystery subgenre in this brooding, atmospheric whodunit set in 16th-century Prague. Superior prose complements the intricate plot.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

YOU BELONG TO ME by Colin Harrison
An elite immigration attorney and obsessive collector of antique New York City maps is drawn into a swiftly escalating series of murders in Harrison’s latest whodunit. “In his latest New York-centered crime thriller, Harrison spins a tightly wound tale of obsession and betrayal. The narrative is as impressively constructed as the maps in Paul’s collection: each section laid out in seamless order to allow for a satisfyingly neat conclusion.” — Publishers Weekly readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Sherlock!

Oh, Sherlock! For fans already mourning the end of the newest TV season, we’ve got two books to satisfy your withdrawal pains:

ARTHUR & SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes by Michael Sims
From the acclaimed author of THE STORY OF CHARLOTTE’S WEB, the rich, true tale tracing the young Arthur Conan Doyle’s creation of Sherlock Holmes and the modern detective story. “Sims makes this carefully researched book approachable as well as scholarly. Recommended for readers interested in Doyle and the genesis of the detective novel, as well as those seeking informative, entertaining reading.” — Library Journal

sherlockMRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation by Brad Ricca
“The author of SUPER BOYS: The Amazing Adventures of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster—The Creators of Superman returns with the astonishing story of the first female U.S. district attorney. Rapid, compelling storytelling informed by rigorous research and enlivened by fecund imagination.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

Share your #FridayReads with us @MacmillanLib. Happy weekend!

Minotaur Stars Roundup

We’re seeing *stars* for these four excellent mysteries:

A GREAT RECKONING by Louise Penny (FOUR STARS)
“The lyrical 12th entry in bestseller Penny’s remarkable series, which has won multiple Agatha awards, finds former Chief Insp. Armand Gamache coming out of retirement to clean up the corrupt Süreté Academy du Québec. This complex novel deals with universal themes of compassion, weakness in the face of temptation, forgiveness, and the danger of falling into despair and cynicism over apparently insurmountable evils.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Once again Penny displays her remarkable ability to serve equally well both series devotees and new readers (if there are any of those still to be found). Gamache fans will be thrilled by the way this installment unlocks some of the series’ enduring mysteries… At the same time, the main plot offers a compelling mystery and a rich human drama in which no character is either entirely good or evil, and each is capable of inspiring empathy.” Booklist, starred review

“A chilling story that’s also filled with hope—a beloved Penny trademark.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

This riveting read, with characters of incredible depth who only add to the strength of the plot, will keep readers guessing until the last page. For series fans and those who enjoy the small-town mysteries of Julia Spencer-Fleming.” Library Journal, starred review

THE ONE MAN by Andrew Gross (FOUR STARS)
“Bestseller Gross revisits the horrors of Auschwitz in this harrowing, thematically rich thriller… Alternating between scenes of American hope-against-hope optimism and Nazi brutality, Blum’s deadly odyssey into and out of this 20th-century hell drives toward a compelling celebration of the human will to survive, remember, and overcome.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“This is Gross’ best work yet, with his heart and soul imprinted on every page.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“This is a genre departure for Gross, who was inspired by his Polish father-in-law to write a Holocaust espionage novel. While the Mendl plot is fictitious, the background and many characters are historically based, adding compassion and depth to a story that is as moving as it is gripping. A winner on all fronts.” — Booklist, starred review

“This is a first-rate tale from a real pro who here takes a different direction from his previous work.”Library Journal, starred review

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JONATHAN STRANGE & MR. NORRELL On Your Telly!

Ah, the weekend. While we’ll still have plenty of time to read, we’re excited for one of our favorite books to come to life on the small screen: JONATHAN STRANGE & MR. NORRELL!

Based on the bestselling novel from Susanna Clarke, this seven-part(!) mini-series takes place during a time when England has ceased to believe in practical magic until the reclusive Mr. Norrell (Eddie Marsan, Sherlock Holmes) steps in to remind everyone what it is they’re missing. But another brilliant budding magician, Jonathan Strange (Bertie Carvel, Les Miserables), has mystical ambitions of his own, and the two open up the world to the enchanting—and often dangerous—side of the supernatural.

Part fantasy, part reimagined historical drama, all fabulousness, JONATHAN STRANGE & MR. NORRELL debuts this Saturday, June 13 at 10pm (EST) on BBC America. Check out the trailer below for a sneak peek!

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BEEKEEPER’S APPRENTICE Common Core Guide

Great news! Laurie R. King has created a free Common Core Guide for THE BEEKEEPER’S APPRENTICE to share with you (and your students and patrons)!

The guide includes guided comprehension & discussion questions, vocabulary lists & worksheets, supplemental research materials, even chapter quizzes & tests, all in a ready-to-print format. (Yes, with a separate teachers’ answer packet, as well!) All of this in addition to the BEEKEEPER book discussion guide and Laurie’s suggested background reading.

“Now, I’d always thought that BEEKEEPER could be a useful introduction to the Twentieth Century: World War One, the women’s movement, roots of conflict in Europe and the Middle East, the huge social and technological changes—all that plus Sherlock Holmes & villains & hansom cabs &—well, let’s just say this is a book that I would have loved to study in school.

Not only will it bring a lot of vulnerable young minds into contact with the Russell & Holmes gateway drug —er, book (to be fair, BEEKEEPER is both an ALA Notable Young Adult Book and an ALA Outstanding Book for the College Bound), it also creates another community around Mary Russell and her world: teachers eager for an excuse to teach a rousing good tale in the classroom.”
— Laurie R. King

Click here to download THE BEEKEEPER’S APPRENTICE Common Core Guide.

 

 

Thriller Thursday (2/6/14 Edition)

Happy #ThrillerThursday to these great new mysteries celebrating a #BookBday this week:
DOING HARM by Kelly Parsons
“As a medical thriller, this skillfully wrought debut gets high marks for building tension to a breathtaking climax." – Library Journal, starred review. Even TV star Joel McHale ("The Soup," "Community") loves it! 

WHO THINKS EVIL
by Michael Kurland
"This latest in Kurland’s novels about the notorious Professor Moriarty—Sherlock Holmes’ most clever adversary—makes for fun reading. Calling Moriarty the hero of these books might stretch the meaning of 'hero' a bit too far—he’s still the evil man we’ve always known him to be—but he’s a fine sleuth and sure makes for a compelling protagonist. Splendid stuff." – Booklist 
"This cozy historical is perfect for World War II buffs interested in the home front scene." – Library Journal
"Ballard infuses emotion and empathy into a very intelligent, believable mystery. Fans of Rhys Bowen may also appreciate this appealing and engagingly written series." – Booklist  
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