Articles tagged "russia"

Nonfiction Round-Up (9/4/19)

Shadow wars + the power of emotions + OBAMA + becoming the best you + the life of a magazine mogul–welcome to today’s nonfiction round-up!

THE RUSSIA TRAP: How Our Shadow War with Russia Could Spiral into Nuclear Catastrophe by George S. Beebe

The former head of CIA’s Russia analysis shows how Washington and Moscow may be headed toward nuclear annihilation.

PERMISSION TO FEEL: Unlocking the Power of Emotions to Help Our Kids, Ourselves, and Our Society Thrive by Marc Brackett

“While Brackett focuses on educational and child-based applications for his methods, his wise principles can easily be applied to adult situations as well. Readers looking for strategies for responding to stress, particularly in children, will find much guidance in this cogent, welcoming work.”–Publishers Weekly

LAUGHING WITH OBAMA: A Photographic Look Back at the Enduring Wit and Spirit of President Barack Obama, Edited by M. Sweeney

Laugh along with a spirited American presidency with this sequel to the best-selling HUGS FROM OBAMA.

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Day’s YA – ECHO NORTH

Happy Friday, YA librarians!

Spring is around the corner (or so they say…), but the setting in this fairy tale retelling is as frigid as they come. Bundle up!

ECHO NORTH by Joanna Ruth Meyer
9781624147159
Ages 14 And Up
Available now from Page Street Kids

As a child, Echo Alkaev was brutally attacked by a wolf. Her scars from that day have made her an outcast, but Echo, ever the bookseller’s daughter, has always been able to find comfort in reading . . . until the day her father disappears and is presumed dead. Six months later, Echo finds him half-frozen in the woods, guarded by the very same wolf who scarred her years ago.

In exchange for her father’s freedom, Echo agrees to live with the wolf but to never look at him between midnight and dawn. During her year in captivity, Echo cares for the wolf’s magical castle, explores the enchanted library, and inevitably grows closer to the wolf. Those familiar with East of the Sun, West of the Moon will recognize the trope, but Meyer puts her own spin on it (#nospoilers).

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Nonfiction Round-Up (2/20/19)

From American imperialism and the WWII Home Front, to an essay collection and a Russian cross-country adventure–check out today’s nonfiction picks:

THE DARKEST YEAR: The American Home Front 1941-1942 by William K. Klingaman
Two starred reviews!
“This thoroughly researched and accessible text will prove elucidating to anyone curious about social history, World War II, or the rhetoric of a country in crisis.”–Library Journal, starred review

“Klingaman uses media, literature, journals, and letters to illustrate the year, and the resulting history is riveting.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

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Fall for Nonfiction

Fall for nonfiction with new books from Bill O’Reilly and Russell Brand, plus a couple of excellent memoirs:

KILLING ENGLAND: The Brutal Struggle for American Independence by Bill O’Reilly, Martin Dugard
O’Reilly and Dugard’s bestselling history series continues with the story of the Revolutionary War, told through the eyes of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Great Britain’s King George III.

RECOVERY: Freedom from Our Addictions by Russell Brand
A guide to all kinds of addiction from a star who has struggled with heroin, alcohol, sex, fame, food, and eBay that will help addicts and their loved ones make the first steps into recovery.

THE BEST OF US: A Memoir by Joyce Maynard
A touching memoir chronicling Maynard’s second marriage. “This haunting story, penned by a master wordsmith, is a reminder to savor every loved one and every day.” — Booklist, starred review

RIOT DAYS by Maria Alyokhina
A Pussy Rioter’s riveting, hallucinatory account of her years in Russia’s criminal system and of finding power in the most powerless of situations… “An inspirational memoir about youthful idealism and the power of popular culture to challenge the status quo.” — Kirkus Reviews

 

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

New Historical Fiction

Happy Monday, friends! We’re kicking off the week with these two new historical novels:

THE TYPEWRITER’S TALE by Michiel Heyns
A novel told from the perspective of Henry James’s fictional typist, Frieda Wroth, who becomes caught up in the friendships and rivalries at James’s house. “Faithfully re-created real-life individuals mix well with authentically drawn fictitious ones.” — Booklist, starred review

THE WHITE RUSSIAN by Vanora Bennett
An enchanting, suspenseful novel of love, art, music, and family secrets set among the Russian émigré community of Paris in 1937. “Bennett offers an intriguing picture of Russian refugees in Paris in the 1930s and a convincing portrayal of Evie’s evolution from naive girl to confident woman.” — Booklist

Seeing Stars

What do these 5 books have in common? They’ve all received more than one starred review!

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer — 3 stars!
“VanderMeer, author of the acclaimed Southern Reach trilogy, has made a career out of eluding genre classifications, and with BORNE he essentially invents a new one. Reading like a dispatch from a world lodged somewhere between science fiction, myth, and a video game, the textures of BORNE shift as freely as those of the titular whatsit.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“VanderMeer’s deep talent for worldbuilding takes him into realms more reminiscent of Cormac McCarthy’s THE ROAD than of the Shire. Superb: a protagonist and a tale sure to please fans of smart, literate fantasy and science fiction.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“VanderMeer marries bildungsroman, domestic drama, love story, and survival thriller into one compelling, intelligent story centered not around the gee-whiz novelty of a flying bear but around complex, vulnerable characters struggling with what it means to be a person. VanderMeer’s talent for immersive world-building and stunning imagery is on display in this weird, challenging, but always heartfelt novel.” — Booklist, starred review

A SINGLE SPY by William Christie
“With detailed historical events, compelling characters, and plenty of heart-grabbing moments, this novel is intensely engaging from the first page. Christie’s fabulous novel of historical espionage will appeal to both World War II fiction buffs and spy novel/thriller aficionados. Extremely well done.” — Library Journal, starred & boxed review

“Part bildungsroman, part history lesson, part political exposé, Christie’s enthralling novel defies expectations while striking all the chords that make spy fiction so enjoyable.” — Kirkus Review, starred review

THE ABOMINABLE MR. SEABROOK by Joe Ollmann
“Comprising 10 years of painstaking research, this graphic biography details the life of obscure writer, occultist, traveler, and bondage fanatic William Seabrook… As both a narrative and a story in pictures, this is an early candidate for the year’s best graphic biography.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Including high adventure, sorrowful drama, and cameos by historical stars such as Man Ray, Aldous Huxley, and Gertrude Stein, this one has all the hallmarks of a classic work of biography and is an early contender for one of the best releases in 2017.” — Library Journal, starred review readmoreremove

New in Nonfiction

Delve into art, history, current events, religion, and more with these new and forthcoming nonfiction titles from Macmillan:

AGE OF ANGER: A History of the Present by Pankaj Mishra
Two starred reviews! “In an impressively probing and timely work, Mishra, a novelist and cultural critic, illuminates intellectual patterns from the past 200 years that help explain our volatile present. This exploration of global unrest is dense, but it’s so well-written and informative that it manages to be highly engaging.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

CAUGHT IN THE REVOLUTION: Petrograd, Russia, 1917 – A World on the Edge by Helen Rappaport
From the New York Times bestselling author of THE ROMANOV SISTERS comes a gripping portrait of a St. Petersburg (then named Petrograd), at the outbreak of the Russian revolution. “An engaging if challenging look at a country’s collapse with worldwide repercussions. Informed general readers will enjoy this glimpse into history; scholars will declare it a definitive study.” — Library Journal, starred review

CHURCHILL’S MINISTRY OF UNGENTLEMANLY WARFARE: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler’s Defeat by Giles Milton
In the spring of 1939, a top-secret organization was founded in London: its purpose was to plot the destruction of Hitler’s war machine through spectacular acts of sabotage. “…Milton emphasizes the audacity and eccentricity of (Special Operations Executive) SOE’s leaders, striking the chord that makes the organization so popular with history readers.” — Booklist

GET WELL SOON: History’s Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them by Jennifer Wright
A witty, irreverent tour of history’s worst plagues—from the Antonine Plague, to leprosy, to polio—and a celebration of the heroes who fought them. “The author’s prose is jaunty, lively, and filled with references to contemporary cultural history, making this work a well-researched page-turner. Readers will get an intense dose of history, written in a not-hard-to-swallow style.” — Library Journal

IDENTITY UNKNOWN: Rediscovering Seven American Women Artists by Donna Seaman
An award-winning writer rescues seven first-rate twentieth-century women artists from oblivion—their lives fascinating, their artwork a revelation. “With impressive research, Booklist editor Seaman curates a fine retrospective on the history of women in the male-dominated world of 20th-century art. …A decidedly important and long-overdue showcase.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

Here & There in History & Travel

Happy Monday! We’ve got a look at U.S. history and a Russian travelogue to kick your week off:

THE TRUE FLAG: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire by Stephen Kinzer
Two starred reviews! “A timely work on the vociferous sides taken over the Spanish-American War of 1898—and how that history relates to the ongoing debate regarding American imperialism. In the last chapter, Kinzer astutely brings the debate from the turn of the century to the present. A tremendously elucidating book that should be required reading for civics courses.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

BEARS IN THE STREETS: Three Journeys Across a Changing Russia by Lisa Dickey
A Russian-speaking writer’s colorful, in-depth look at the Russian people from journeys to Russia in in 1995, 2005 and 2015. “Filled with then-and-now photographs, Dickey’s travelogue is truly heartwarming, drawing strength from the honesty and openness of the people she visits and revisits and opening windows on the opinions of the Russian people on nearly everything, from homosexuality to Putin. Fascinating and a balm to readers enduring the current xenophobic plague.” — Booklist, starred review

Check out our recent nonfiction all-stars, too!

Friday Reads: History

Happy Friday, lovely librarians! Today’s #FridayReads delve into Russian and Iranian history via fiction and fact:

THE IMPERIAL WIFE by Irina Reyn
“The Russians are coming in this ingeniously structured novel that travels between a present-day art specialist handling the biggest sale of her career and the 18th-century court life of the woman who becomes Catherine the Great.” — O Magazine

THE FALL OF HEAVEN: The Pahlavis and the Final Days of Imperial Iran by Andrew Scott Cooper
An immersive, gripping account of the rise and fall of Iran’s glamorous Pahlavi dynasty, written with the cooperation of the late Shah’s widow, Empress Farah. “A well-researched and fascinating book for readers interested in the history of Iran and the Middle East, current Iranian affairs, and the history of fundamentalist terrorism.” — Library Journal

Share your #FridayReads with us @MacmillanLib. Happy weekend!
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