Articles tagged "refugees"

Required Friday Reading (8/10/18)

It’s important, now more than ever, to continue reading, reflecting, and engaging in open dialogue about the issues facing us all as a nation. Here are our picks to help you do just that:

A HOPE MORE POWERFUL THAN THE SEA: One Refugee’s Incredible Story of Love, Loss, and Survival by Melissa Fleming

2018 Alex Award Winner

2018 ALA Amelia Bloomer List

“This poignant tale of survival and loss gives immediacy to the plight of Syrian refugees. Fleming’s skillful writing brings new vividness to Doaa Al Zamel’s dramatic story. This book amply demonstrates why Al Zamel has since become a symbol of hope for other refugees. Fleming should be congratulated for bringing [this] inspiring and illuminating story to the page.” — Publishers Weekly

BUTTERFLY: From Refugee to Olympian – My Story of Rescue, Hope, and Triumph by Yusra Mardini

BUTTERFLY is a powerful story of survival, inspiration, and hope with a resounding message: no one chooses to be a refugee; rather, horrific circumstances force ordinary people to take extraordinary measures to save themselves. This unforgettable memoir shines a spotlight on the refugee experience and the role sports can play in giving a voice to those affected by conflict throughout the world… Teens who enjoyed I AM MALALA will find another heroine in this inspirational memoir of a Syrian swimmer who became an advocate for refugees.” Booklist, starred review

CITY OF THORNS: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp by Ben Rawlence

Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist

Kirkus Reviews Best Books of the Year

“[A] remarkable book…Like Dadaab itself, the story has no conclusion. It is a portrait, beautifully and movingly painted. And it is more than that. At a time when newspapers are filled with daily images of refugees arriving in boats on Europe’s shores, when politicians and governments grapple with solutions to migration and erect ever larger walls and fences, it is an important reminder that a vast majority of the world’s refugees never get as far as a boat or a border of the developed world.” — Caroline Moorehead, The New York Times Book Review

IN THE COUNTRY WE LOVE: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero

“Guerrero relates her struggle to hold her life together, get through high school and college, and find her feet in the world—challenges that will resonate with many readers… [She] writes with humor and heartbreaking honesty. Offering readers the story she needed to hear as a child, Guerrero shines a light on this country’s flawed immigration system, eloquently calling for reform without diminishing her appreciation for the opportunities US citizenship has afforded her. A timely and enlightening read.” — Booklist

SPARE PARTS: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis

“A gratifying human interest story that calls attention to the plight and promise of America’s undocumented youth.” — Library Journal

“Davis takes what could have been another feel-good story of triumphant underdogs and raises the stakes by examining the difficulties of these young immigrants in the context of the societal systems that they briefly and temporarily overcame.” — Publishers Weekly

ONE PERSON, NO VOTE: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy by Carol Anderson

“This whiplash-inducing chronicle of how a nation that just a few short years ago elected its first black president now finds itself in the throes of a deceitful and craven effort to rip this most essential of American rights from millions of its citizens.” — Booklist, starred review

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Adult Books for Teens

Whether young or young at heart, these adult books are great for readers of all ages!

BUTTERFLY: From Refugee to Olympian – My Story of Rescue, hope, and Triumph by Yusra Mardini
When young Syrian refugee Yusra Mardini realized her boat’s engine shut down as she was traveling from Syria to Greece with other refugees, there was no hesitation: she dove into the water, grabbed the boat’s rope with one hand, and began inching the boat towards the distant shore. This bold act of bravery saved the lives of a boatload of refugees heading to Turkey from Syria. After her arrival in Greece, Mardini, focused and undeterred, worked toward a lifelong goal: to compete in the Olympics. She succeeded, and competed in 2016 on the Refugee Olympic Team in Rio de Janeiro.

“This unforgettable memoir shines a spotlight on the refugee experience and the role sports can play in giving a voice to those affected by conflict throughout the world.” —Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

January 2018 All-Stars

These forthcoming books are raking in the starred reviews—make sure to add them to your library’s shelves ASAP!

THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat
“Tamirat’s razor-sharp prose fashions a magnificently dimensional and emotionally resonant narrator, herself a storyteller who frames her own tale with beguiling skill. This debut is remarkable in every way.” — Booklist, starred review

“Tamirat’s wonderful debut novel weaves growing pains, immigrant troubles, and moments of biting humor. The unsettling conclusion serves as a perfect ending for this riveting coming-of-age story full of murky motives, deep emotion, and memorable characters.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

GODS OF HOWL MOUNTAIN by Taylor Brown
“Brown immerses the reader in the mountain landscape… [his] dialogue, too, is magical, capturing the local idioms and cadences and rendering them musical. Brown has quickly established himself in the top echelon of Southern writers, and his latest will please readers of Wiley Cash and Ron Rash.” — Booklist, starred review

“Not to be missed, this bold, dark, gritty novel is another coup for Brown, whose lyrical descriptions of the landscape only add to the captivating story of indomitable but isolated folks bound by folklore, tradition, and a hardscrabble life.”Library Journal, starred review

MEMENTO PARK by Mark Sarvas
“Sarvas couples a suspenseful mystery with nuanced meditations on father-son bonds, the intricacies of identity, the aftershocks of history’s horrors, and the ways people and artworks can—perhaps even must—be endlessly reinterpreted. ” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Because of its scope and deft handling of aspects of identity in matters of love, family, religion, and loss, this literary work is highly recommended to the broadest audience.” — Library Journal, starred review

WHISKEY by Bruce Holbert
“[An] impressive novel… Like Cormac McCarthy, another bard of the modern West’s brutality, Holbert finds beauty and cruelty in the land, in the tease and punch of eloquently elliptical dialogue, and in the way humans struggle for love, self-knowledge, and a grip on life. A gut-punch of a bleak family saga that satisfies on many levels.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Holbert returns with a violent, gruesome, and beautiful tale that, despite its despondency, is perversely winning. The violence in this rangy, brilliant narrative is often grotesque, but this excess is tempered by dry humor, wonderful dialogue, and dark wisdom.” Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

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