Articles tagged "race"

A Meteor Shower of Stars for Macmillan!

These forthcoming titles all received multiple starred reviews!

Fiction

NINTH HOUSE by Leigh Bardugo

“With an aura of both enchantment and authenticity, Bardugo’s compulsively readable novel leaves a portal ajar for equally dazzling sequels.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“This atmospheric contemporary novel steeped in the spirit of a mystical New Haven is part mystery, part story of a young woman finding purpose in a dark world, and is the first in a potential series. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Adults are just as enamored of Bardugo’s YA novels as teens are, and many have been anxiously and curiously awaiting this one.”–Booklist, starred review

MACHINE by Susan Steinberg

“Teenagers spend a hazy summer at the shore. One girl comes to terms with both her emerging independence and the mysterious death of a girl just like her… Heartbreaking, eerie, and acutely observant.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“What makes this tale so thrilling is Steinberg’s artistry with form; she fractures narrative into its fundamental parts. Steinberg writes prose with a poet’s sense of meter and line, and a velocity recalling the novels of Joan Didion. The result is a dizzying work that perfectly evokes the feeling of spinning out of control.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

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An Interview with Jennifer Berry Hawes

After the tragic shootings at the Mother Emanuel AME church, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jennifer Berry Hawes knew this was a story that needed telling. In GRACE WILL LEAD US HOME: The Charleston Church Massacre and the Hard, Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness, she offers a moving portrait of the events and emotions that emerged in the massacre’s wake. Today, Hawes joins us to share more about her writing experience, to highlight a courageous librarian named Cynthia Hurd, and to talk about life as a Charlestonian since that terrible day in 2015.

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How did you decide you wanted to write a book on the massacre?

I didn’t think about writing a book until five or six months after June 17, 2015. I had been covering the aftermath of the shooting for the newspaper I work for in Charleston and had begun to realize that, while the massacre itself had caused such unimaginable pain for the survivors and the victims’ loved ones, it was only the opening chapter of a much more complex story. I have since come to think of mass shootings as akin to tossing a rock into a pond. The initial impact disrupts the surface in obvious ways. But then ripple upon ripple of disruption spreads from that impact. This is what happens after these events, and happened here, from divisions among families and the church to divisions within families grappling with so much pain. Add in critical issues to our nation–race and gun violence–and this became a much more complicated story than we could tell in our newspaper. My editors agreed. As people who live and breathe Charleston, we wanted to bear witness to this deeper narrative.

Tell us a little about the librarian, Cynthia Hurd, one of the nine people killed in the church.

To me, the lush garden of climbing roses and overflowing window boxes that Cynthia meticulously tended outside of her home beautifully illustrates her essence. She was a helper, a nurturer, a warm spirit who greeted people with a wide, toothy smile. When her sister, Jackie, was diagnosed with cancer just a couple of weeks before the shooting, Jackie called Cynthia first. “I got you,” Cynthia promised, and everyone knew she meant it. When Cynthia agreed to stay at Bible study on June 17, she had plans to go with Jackie, who lived two states away, to meet with doctors and discuss her treatment options the following week.

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BLACKkKLANSMAN Wins an Oscar!

The movie BlacKkKlansman, adapted from Ron Stallworth’s BLACK KLANSMAN: Race, Hate, and the Undercover Investigation of a Lifetime, won Best Adapted Screenplay at last night’s Oscars ceremony!

Congratulations to this incredible story and the directors, writers, actors, and producers who brought it to life on the big screen.

Nonfiction Round-Up (2/13/19)

Race in America, a legendary film, and an outspoken Feminist are the varied topics covered in today’s Nonfiction Round-up.

GOOD KIDS, BAD CITY: A Story of Race and Wrongful Conviction in America by Kyle Swenson
“Cinematically written, this powerful tragedy of racial injustice and urban dysfunction will make readers question the idea that America can promise ‘justice for all.'” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

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Nonfiction Round-Up (2/6/19)

Race, Love, the Wild West, and becoming a Badass–dive into this week’s nonfiction round-up!

BROWN WHITE BLACK: An American Family at the Intersection of Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Religion by Nishta J. Mehra
Two starred reviews!
“Mehra’s nuanced and thought-provoking work resonates on multiple levels—from the immigrant experience and race relations to accepting one’s sexuality, adoption, parenthood, and more. Excellent for readers interested in family and issues of identity in America.”–Library Journal, starred review

HARD TO LOVE: Essays and Confessions by Briallen Hopper
“Whether she is writing about her fraught decision to become pregnant with donated sperm, a friend’s bout with cancer, baking (‘a code for conveying care safely without the ambiguity of words’), the collective energy of the Women’s March, or a visit to the Foundling Museum, Hopper’s essays seem like love songs, as well: delicate, thoughtful elegies to friendship, compassion, and grace. A fresh, well-crafted collection.”--Kirkus Reviews, starred review

WILD BILL: The True Story of the American Frontier’s First Gunfighter by Tom Clavin
“A vigorous yarn concerning the man who, by Clavin’s (DODGE CITY) account, set the template for the Wild West gunslinger…. Good history accessibly and ably told.” —Kirkus Reviews

THE WARRIOR CODE: 11 Principles to Unleash the Badass Inside of You by Tee Marie Hanible with Denene Millner
“Hanible’s practical, no-nonsense advice and her candidness about both her missteps and all she’s endured and conquered make her an impressive role model and guide for women and men of all ages who are navigating challenges in their lives.”–Booklist

SUPER MEGA Stars On Stars On Stars On Stars (1/11/19)

Forecast calls for a meteor shower! Make room on your shelves for our many STARS.

Fiction:

THE NOWHERE CHILD by Christian White
“White’s tightly woven debut thriller has already won the Victorian Premier Literary Award in Australia; its arrival Stateside comes highly recommended.”–Library Journal, starred review

“The impatient may be tempted to skip ahead, but they shouldn’t. Thriller fans will want to savor every crumb of evidence and catch every clue. White is definitely a writer to watch.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

TRUST EXERCISE by Susan Choi
[T]he writing (exquisite) and the observations (cuttingly accurate) make Choi’s latest both wrenching and one-of-a-kind. Never sentimental; always thrillingly alive.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Fiercely intelligent, impeccably written, and observed with searing insight, this novel is destined to be a classic.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

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June 2018 Nonfiction

Add these June nonfiction titles to your library’s shelves today:

THE THIRD BANK OF THE RIVER: Power and Survival in the Twenty-First Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold
A veteran journalist traces the war over the Amazon as activists, locals, and indigenous tribes struggle to save the jungle from the threat of loggers, drug lords, and corrupt politicians. “A saddening, maddening story that draws much-needed attention to crime without punishment in a remote—but not invisible—part of the world.” —Kirkus Reviews

WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE: Robert F Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our unfinished Conversation About Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson
Also available in audio
A stunning follow up to TEARS WE CANNOT STOP, WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE is another timely exploration of America’s tortured racial politics. This book exists at the tense intersection of the conflict between politics and prophecy—of whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape. “After providing the backstories and historical context of the participants, Dyson offers contemporary examples of public figures who struggle for equality. The result is a moving ode to the potentiality of American social progress.” —Booklist, starred review

WHAT WOULD THE GREAT ECONOMISTS DO?: How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve Today’s Biggest Problems by Linda Yueh
A timely exploration of the life and work of world-changing thinkers—from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes—and how their ideas would solve the great economic problems we face today. “Few economics books are able to address major problems, present leading and sometimes conflicting theories, and be accessible to the casual reader. Yueh takes current issues affecting today’s economy and attacks them through the eyes of a dozen leading economists, from the historic to the contemporary, clearly applying their work to modern problems.” —Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

Buzzfeed’s “Amazing New Books You Need To Read This Spring” 2018

Poetry, essays, short stories… these Buzzfeed-recommended books will spring off your library’s shelves!

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
US Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith returns with WADE IN THE WATER, a new collection of poems that feels both timely and timeless. In lines that are as lyrical as they are wise (and so poignant you’ll want to write them down immediately), Smith makes connections between the current state of American culture and its history — police brutality, slavery, immigration, the Civil War, the Declaration of Independence (which she turns into an erasure poem). What does it mean to be an American, to be a woman in a society still dominated by men? Smith captures memories, found language, music, and the voices of the past to get to the beating heart of our nation today — and you’ll feel it in every fiber of your being while reading.

A LUCKY MAN by Jamel Brinkley
The nine stories in Jamel Brinkley’s collection A LUCKY MAN are about black men grappling with their place in the world, their pasts, their friendships, and their families — boys coming of age and encountering firsthand how privilege is tied to race and class, brothers navigating strained relationships, parents and children disappointing each other. Brinkley shows both the great beauty and ugliness of humanity — but always with empathy — and captures the ways in which our world is defined and divided by power. A LUCKY MAN so real and alive, much like its characters, that you’ll be eager to read whatever Brinkley writes next.

EYE LEVEL by Jenny Xie
US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Hererra chose Jenny Xie as the winner of the Academy of American Poets’ 2017 Walt Whitman Award, and it’s easy to see why in her debut collection EYE LEVEL. Xie’s poems take us on a journey to new places (Vietnam, Cambodia, even a Greek island) in such vivid detail that you’ll feel as if you really traveled, as well as to new questions about immigration, identity, and loneliness. How do we really find home? What do we lose when we leave? Reading EYE LEVEL feels like taking a trip with someone who truly sees you, and the world, as it is. readmoreremove

For Your Consideration: June 2018 LibraryReads Titles

Download, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the June 2018 LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due April 20! Click here for the full list of 2018 deadlines.

BRING ME BACK by B.A. Paris
Also available in audio
The new thriller from the LibraryReads author of BEHIND CLOSED DOORS. “Paris once again proves her suspense chops with this can’t-put-down psychological thriller.” — Library Journal, starred review

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
Also available in audio
THREE starred reviews! Hilarious and poignant, the new adventures of Kate Reddy, the beleaguered heroine of Allison Pearson’s groundbreaking New York Times bestseller I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT. “Tackling sexism, growing older, and understanding one’s needs when catering to those of so many others, Pearson writes realism with all the fun of escapism.” — Booklist, starred review

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

WITCHMARK by C.L. Polk
Two starred reviews! A “stellar” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) fantasy debut that combines intrigue, magic, betrayal, and romance in an original world with a historical WWI tone. “Many disparate elements are expertly woven together to make this debut a crackler, with layers like a nesting doll and just as delightful to discover.” — Booklist, starred review

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

JAR OF HEARTS by Jennifer Hillier
Also available in audio
What if you went to jail for something terrible your boyfriend did to your best friend? Then 5 years later, you’re free but your life is in ruins, and your boyfriend is back at it (killing, that is), and maybe he’s coming for you? “…this psychological thriller is unlike any other. Enthralled readers will be rooting for Geo in the end.” — Library Journal, starred review

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
One of Publishers Weekly’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction picks with three starred reviews! The critically acclaimed author of OUTLINE and TRANSIT, completes her “stunning” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) trilogy with a finale that examines the relationship between pain and honor, and investigates the moral nature of success as a precept of both art and living. “Brilliantly accomplished and uncompromisingly dark.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

BLACK KLANSMAN: Race, Hate, and the Undercover Investigation of a Lifetime by Ron Stallworth
Also available in audio
The extraordinary true story of the African American police officer who goes undercover to investigate the KKK, the basis for the forthcoming major motion picture written and directed by Spike Lee, and produced by Oscar winner Jordan Peele.

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss
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Booklist’s Rogue Book-Group Choices

Booklist hosted a live event with librarian book-group experts to talk about what makes a good selection, how to pick something unexpected for your group without causing a mass exodus, and lots and lots of suggestions for when you want to take your book group rogue. Check out their Macmillan recommendations:

BINTI by Nnedi Okorafor
Science fiction can be scary for book groups, but don’t be afraid, especially if Black Panther piqued your interest. BINTI is about space, sure, but it’s really about race and other meaty issues.

CAN’T WE TALK ABOUT SOMETHING MORE PLEASANT? by Roz Chast
Dealing with aging parents is a familiar book group topic. This graphic novel includes art and photography that will enhance the conversation.

EVERFAIR by Nisi Shawl
Like BINTI, this is an Afro-futurist sci-fi book, plus steam punk and alternate history! So many genres. It will lead to discussions about prejudice, identity, colonialism, and even the structure of the story itself.

IF I WAS YOUR GIRL by Meredith Russo
Another YA book that adult book groups might poo-poo. It’s a teen love story, but the heroine is a trans girl who starts her senior year at a new school where she can be herself. If your book group members like to gain new understanding of people they might not (think they) encounter in real life, this is a great choice.

THE LONELY CITY by Olivia Laing
Pair with images of the artists discussed (Hopper, Warhol, Wojnarowicz); you can also talk about gentrification.

Watch the full event below!

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