Articles tagged "Publishers Weekly"

PW Best Books of Summer 2017

PWSummer2017Publishers Weekly’s editors recently selected their Best Books of Summer 2017, including these seven Macmillan titles:
Staff Picks (full list)

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
“About that thing on the cover—is it a genetically modified bird-of-paradise? Some cousin of the odoriferous corpse flower? I was intrigued from the moment I saw it, as is Rachel, the postapocalyptic scavenger who finds the improbably sentient and mutable creature—who ‘smelled of beach reeds on lazy summer afternoons and, beneath the sea salt, of passionflowers’—while picking through the fur of the gargantuan flying bear that terrorizes her devastated city. And then things start to get weird.” — Carolyn Juris, features editor

ISADORA by Amelia Gray
“Gray’s most recent book, the story collection GUTSHOT, was weird as hell and as visceral as its title. Whose life would be better for her to fictionalize, then, than that of notorious mother of modern dance Isadora Duncan? An openly bisexual communist and atheist in an era that condemned all three, Duncan was famous for wearing long, flowing scarves even up until her death, when her scarf got caught in one of the axles of the car she was riding in. Flung from the vehicle, Duncan died of a broken neck—a tragic end that will surely make for a riveting finale in Gray’s novel.” — John Maher, assistant news editor

Fiction (full list)

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
Ginder takes family dysfunction to its hysterical limit in this joyously ribald novel about siblings Alice and Paul begrudgingly attending the lavish wedding of their half-sister, Eloise, in England. Lovesick Alice and Paul—both in doomed relationships—see Eloise as the snotty daughter of a rich dad, and Donna, their mother, as a coldhearted widow who ditched all remnants of their father after his death. During the boozy pre-wedding days, the resentment and secrets come tumbling out in outbursts and hilariously bad decisions. readmoreremove

PW’s Writers to Watch Spring 2017: Anticipated Debuts

Publishers Weekly recently shared their most anticipated debuts of Spring 2017, including two of our favorites:

MARLENA by Julie Buntin
Teenage friendships almost never make sense, which might explain why so many of them fall apart as people get older, and also why fiction writers often turn to them for material. When Julie Buntin was working on MARLENA, her debut novel about the aftermath of an intense friendship between two teenage girls, she was faced with the challenge of making that particular obsession legible to readers. “It’s hard to capture why a character finds someone else magnetic,” Buntin, 29, says. “How can you translate that into something the reader can connect to?”

Marlena centers on two characters, 15-year-old Cat and 17-year-old Marlena, who become pals when Cat moves to the town in northern Michigan where Marlena lives. Buntin, in the words of PW’s starred review, “is particularly sensitive to the misery of adolescent angst,” observing how Cat becomes increasingly enamored of the unstable Marlena, who is “musically talented, beautiful, and doomed to die young.”


THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR by Yewande Omotoso
Rare is the novel that features older women as protagonists, rather than as mere supporting characters or props. Rarer still is the novel willing to depict aging women in all their complications, regrets, and swarming hostilities. But that’s precisely what Yewande Omotoso, a Barbados-born South African writer, set out to do her in novel, THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR, her second work of fiction and her first to be published in the U.S. readmoreremove

PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017

These ten Macmillan titles are some of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017:

Fiction
BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
In a future strewn with the cast-off experiments of an industrial laboratory known only as the Company, a scavenger named Rachel survives alongside her lover, Wick, a dealer of memory-altering beetles with whom she takes shelter from the periodic ravages of a giant mutant bear named Mord. One day, caught in Mord’s fur, Rachel finds the bizarre, shape-shifting creature “like a hybrid of sea anemone and squid” she calls Borne.

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror
AMBERLOUGH by Lara Elena Donnelly
Donnelly’s debut, a fast-moving tale of desperate love and intrigue in a created world that recalls Europe on the brink of WWII, is emotionally wrenching and shockingly timely.

Poetry
AFTERLAND by Mai Der Vang
Vang, the 2016 Walt Whitman Award winner, tells the story of Hmong diaspora forced out of Laos and into exile as a result of the U.S.’s secret war. Vang’s unflinching poems address the status of refugees, including her family, and Hmong resilience in exile.

Comics/Graphic Novels
BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
Tamaki’s last two books—THIS ONE SUMMER and SUPER MUTANT MAGIC ACADEMY—showed she is one of the world’s best cartoonists, and this collection of her evocative short stories will just cement her reputation.

Memoir
THIS CLOSE TO HAPPY: A Reckoning with Depression by Daphne Merkin
A personal account of a life afflicted with depression, from an affluent but neglected childhood to the present day.

Literary Essays/Criticism/Biographies
THE NOVEL OF THE CENTURY: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables by David Bellos
Bellos, a translator of French literature, proves that the story of how Victor Hugo’s classic novel came to life is a complex and engrossing epic all its own.

Politics/Current Events
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.
Former public defender Forman offers a complex look at the part played by African-Americans in shaping criminal justice policy.

Music
RECKLESS DAUGHTER: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell by David Yaffe
A biography, with dozens of in-person interviews with Mitchell, reveals the backstory behind the famous songs—from her youth on the Canadian prairie, the child she gave up for adoption, through her albums and love affairs, to the present. readmoreremove

PW Spring 2017 Announcements

Publishers Weekly looked into their crystal ball and predicted that these 98(!) Macmillan adult books will stand out in the first half of 2017:
Art, Architecture & Photography (full list)

THE SAGRADA FAMILIA: The Astonishing Story of Gaudí’s Unfinished Masterpiece by Gijs van Hensbergen
Out: July 25
This book chronicles the story of architect Antoni Gaudí’s strange masterpiece, which has remained under construction for the past 130 years, as well as the building’s complicated relationship with the city and residents of Barcelona.

YOUNG LEONARDO: The Evolution of a Revolutionary Artist, 1472–1499 by Jean-Pierre Isbouts and Christopher Heath Brown
Out: May 23
A study of Leonardo da Vinci’s formative years, his triumphs and failures in the Renaissance art world, and how his techniques developed into the style he’s famous for today.

Business & Economics (full list)

GLASS HOUSE: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town by Brian Alexander (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 14
Alexander examines how the purchase of the Anchor Hocking Glass Company by a private equity firm all but destroyed the company and the town of Lancaster, Ohio.

DROP THE BALL: Achieving More by Doing Less by Tiffany Dufu
Out: Feb. 14
Dufu recounts how she learned to reevaluate expectations, shrink her to-do list, and meaningfully engage the assistance of others—freeing the space she needed to flourish at work and to develop deeper, more meaningful relationships at home. Foreword by Gloria Steinem.

THE COMPLACENT CLASS: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream by Tyler Cowen
Out: Feb. 28
The well-known blogger, economist, and author argues that by relying on algorithms that wall Americans off from anything that might be too new or different, we postpone necessary change, which will lead to major fiscal and budgetary crisis.

Comics & Graphic Novels (full list)

BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki (a Top 10 pick)
Out: June 6
With masterful art and evocative storytelling, Tamaki’s short stories tackle subjects from bedbugs to the addictive nature of pop culture to pornography.

PALOOKAVILLE #23 by Seth (a Top 10 pick)
Out: May 30
Seth’s been writing his massive story of the Matchcard brothers and their failing fan company since 1998, and it finally winds up in this book.

THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS WRONG by Mimi Pond
Out: Apr. 18
Pond’s autobiographical story continues with the saga of a naive young artist working in a restaurant full of drunks, junkies, thieves, and creeps. Pond folds their tales into her own emergence as an artist in the scuzzy, low-rent war zone of late 1970s Oakland.

HOSTAGE by Guy Delisle
Out: May 2
In the middle of the night in 1997, Doctors Without Borders administrator Christophe André was kidnapped by armed men and kept prisoner for three months in the Caucasus. Award-winning cartoonist Delisle recounts André’s harrowing experiences.

Cooking & Food (full list)

KNIFE: Steakhouse Meals at Home by John Tesar (a Top 10 pick)
Out: May 2
Bravo’s Top Chef contestant celebrates steak in every form, with recipes for popular cuts.

RIVER COTTAGE A TO Z: Our Favourite Ingredients, & How to Cook Them by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Pam Corbin, Mark Diacono, Nikki Duffy, Nick Fisher, Steven Lamb, Tim Maddams, Gill Meller, and John Wright
Out: May 2
An authoritative encyclopedia of more than 300 ingredients and 300 recipes, set to become a solid addition to the River Cottage library.

THE BUTCHER BABE COOKBOOK: Comfort Food Hacked by a Classically Trained Chef by Loreal Gavin
Out: Apr. 25
A quirky Food Network chef elevates classic cooking techniques with eclectic, rock ’n’ roll twists.

AN AMERICAN GIRL IN LONDON: 101 Nourishing Recipes for Your Family from a Californian Expat by Marissa Hermer
Out: Apr. 4
The restaurateur and star of Bravo’s Ladies of London provides nourishing, family-friendly recipes inspired by her Californian childhood and current British lifestyle.

FABIO’S 30-MINUTE ITALIAN: Over 100 Fabulous, Quick, and Easy Recipes by Fabio Viviani
Out: May 2
The bestselling author of FABIO’S ITALIAN KITCHEN presents a collection of recipes with tips and inspiration for making great Italian food in no time.

Essays & Literary Criticism (full list)

THE NOVEL OF THE CENTURY: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables by David Bellos (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Mar. 7
Bellos recounts the birth and many later lives of one of the world’s most popular novels.

AMERICAN ORIGINALITY: Essays on Poetry by Louise Glück
Out: Mar. 14
The poet’s second book of essays, after 1993’s PROOFS AND THEORIES, focuses on contemporary American poetry.

HOUSMAN COUNTRY: Into the Heart of England by Peter Parker
Out: June 20
This book investigates the particularly English sensibility of poet and classical scholar A.E. Housman (1859–1936), best remembered for the collection A SHROPSHIRE LAD, published in 1896.

TOO MUCH AND NOT IN THE MOOD: Essays by Durga Chew-Bose
Out: Apr. 11
Inspired by Virginia Woolf’s April 11, 1931, entry in A WRITER’S DIARY, Chew-Bose makes a self-portrait of a young writer shutting out the din in order to find her own voice.

THE WORLD BROKE IN TWO: Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster and the Year that Changed Literature by Bill Goldstein
Out: July 4
A narrative of the intersecting lives and works of four revered authors during 1922, the birth year of modernism.

ONE DAY WE’LL ALL BE DEAD AND NONE OF THIS WILL MATTER: Essays by Scaachi Koul
Out: May 2
A debut collection about growing up the daughter of Indian immigrants, addressing sexism, cultural stereotypes, and the universal miseries of life.

History (full list)

CAUGHT IN THE REVOLUTION: Petrograd, Russia, 1917—A World on the Edge by Helen Rappaport (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
The author of THE ROMANOV SISTERS relates the outbreak of the Russian revolution through eyewitness accounts left by foreign nationals who saw the drama unfold.

LENIN ON THE TRAIN by Catherine Merridale (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Mar. 28
A celebrated scholar of Russian history offers an account of Lenin’s 1917 rail trip from Zurich to Petrograd, and the underground conspiracy and subterfuge that went into making it happen.

HIGH NOON: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic by Glenn Frankel
Out: Feb. 21
Frankel relates the making of the 1952 American western film High Noon, and how screenwriter Carl Foreman’s concept of the film evolved from idea to first draft to final script, taking on allegorical weight as he was forced to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his former membership in the Communist Party.

ISABELLA OF CASTILE: Europe’s First Great Queen by Giles Tremlett
Out: Mar. 7
Chronicles the life of Isabella of Castile, whose marriage to Ferdinand of Aragon in 1479 united two kingdoms, setting the stage for Spain’s golden era of global dominance.

THE LOCOMOTIVE OF WAR: Money, Empire, Power, and Guilt by Peter Clarke
Out: July 18
This book studies the power of war through the trajectories of David Lloyd George, Winston Churchill, John Maynard Keynes, Woodrow Wilson, and F.D.R., while examining the interplay between key figures in the context of unprecedented all-out wars (both in 1914 and 1939) and the broader dynamics of history during an extraordinary period.

AUTUMN OF THE BLACK SNAKE by William Hogeland
Out: May 16
Hogeland conjures up the woodland battles and hardball politics that formed the Legion of the United States, the country’s first true standing army, when in 1783 the newly independent United States found itself losing an escalating military conflict on its borderlands.

APOLLO 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon by Jeffrey Kluger
Out: May 16
Kluger tells of the 1968 race—over the course of just 16 weeks—to prepare an untested rocket to launch humankind’s first flight to the moon.

DODGE CITY: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West by Tom Clavin
Out: Feb. 28
Relates the story of two young and largely self-trained lawmen who led the effort that established frontier justice and the rule of law in the American West, specifically the depraved and criminal town of Dodge City, Kans.

MURDER IN THE CITY: New York, 1910–1920 by Wilfried Kaute
Out: June 13
A time capsule of crime and murder in New York in the decade of the 1910s, documented through more than 150 photographs, medical and police reports, testimonies, and analysis from the era.

Lifestyle (full list)

A COLORFUL WAY OF LIVING: How to Be More, Create More, Do More the Vera Bradley Way by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Apr. 4
The founder of Vera Bradley shares the values to which she attributes her company’s runaway success.

THE HUNGRY BRAIN: Outsmarting the Instincts That Make Us Overeat by Stephan Guyenet (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
Neuroscience researcher Guyenet ties together mind and body in a health guide aimed at changing habits of thought, as well as habits of fitness and diet.

REAL LOVE: The Art of Authentic Connection by Sharon Salzberg
Out: June 6
A creative toolkit of mindfulness exercises, meditation techniques, and interactive applications that will guide readers through the process of stripping away layers of habit to find a truer meaning of love.

WHAT THE DEAD HAVE TAUGHT ME ABOUT LIVING WELL by Rebecca Rosen
Out: Feb. 14
A spiritual medium opens up about her personal life and answers the question she is asked most often: how does your connection to the “other side” help you navigate your day-to-day world?

THE HIIT BIBLE: Supercharge Your Body and Brain by Steve Barrett
Out: July 18
With HIIT (high intensity interval training) attaining widespread acceptance as a method for improving cardiovascular performance, this book aims to consolidate and demystify the science while also highlighting some of HIIT’s lesser-known benefits.

Literary Fiction (full list)

UNIVERSAL HARVESTER by John Darnielle (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
When mysterious footage begins appearing on VHS cassettes at the local Video Hut, life in the small town of Nevada, Iowa, takes a dark turn.

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
Out: June 6
A fractured family from the Chicago suburbs gathers in London for the eldest daughter’s marriage to an upper-crust Englishman, proving that the harder we strain against the ties that bind, the tighter they hold us close.

THE ANSWERS by Catherine Lacey
Out: June 6
Mary scours Craigslist for fast-cash jobs and finds herself applying for the “Girlfriend Experiment,” the brainchild of an eccentric and narcissistic actor, Kurt Sky, who is determined to find the perfect relationship—even if that means paying different women to fulfill distinctive roles.

LOVER by Anna Raverat
Out: Mar. 7
Kate, a senior executive at a multinational hotel company, has devoted her life to her job and her family. Catering to the needs of others comes easily to her, but now, after 10 years of marriage and two children, Kate discovers e-mails from her husband to another woman.

ENCIRCLING by Carl Frode Tiller, trans. by Barbara J. Haveland
Out: Feb. 21
David has lost his memory. When a newspaper ad asks his friends and family to share their memories of him, three respond: Jon, his closest friend; Silje, his teenage girlfriend; and Arvid, his estranged stepfather. This first book of a trilogy is a psychological portrait of a man by his friends.

SO MUCH BLUE by Percival Everett
Out: June 13
Kevin Pace, working on a painting that he won’t allow anyone to see, had an affair 10 years earlier with a young watercolorist in Paris. As the events of the past intersect with the present, Kevin struggles to justify the sacrifices he’s made for his art and the secrets he’s kept from his wife.

MARLENA by Julie Buntin
Out: Apr. 4
Fifteen-year-old Cat’s new town in rural Michigan is lonely and off-kilter, until she meets her neighbor, the manic, beautiful, pill-popping Marlena. The story of two girls and the feral year that will cost one her life and define the other’s for decades.

THE WOMAN NEXT DOOR by Yewande Omotoso
Out: Feb. 7
Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbors. One is black, the other white. Both have recently been widowed, and are living with questions, disappointments, and secrets that have brought them shame. And each has something that the woman next door deeply desires.

THE STANDARD GRAND by Jay Baron Nicorvo
Out: Apr. 25
When an Army trucker goes AWOL before her third deployment, she meets a Vietnam vet and widower who inherited a tumbledown borscht belt resort. Converted into a halfway house for homeless veterans, the Standard—and its 2,000 acres over the Marcellus shale formation—is coveted by a Houston-based multinational company. Three violent acts are at the center of this debut.

Memoirs & Biographies (full list)

SCHADENFREUDE, A LOVE STORY: Me, the Germans, and 20 Years of Attempted Transformations, Unfortunate Miscommunications, and Humiliating Situations That Only They Have Words For by Rebecca Schuman (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
A young Jewish intellectual falls in love with a boy, a language, and a landscape as well as Kafka, and tries to figure them all out.

THIS CLOSE TO HAPPY: A Reckoning with Depression by Daphne Merkin (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
A personal account of a life afflicted with depression, from an affluent but neglected childhood to the present day.

THIS IS NOT A BORDER: Reportage and Reflection from the Palestine Festival of Literature by Ahdaf Soueif (a Top 10 pick)
Out: May 9
A collection of essays, poems, and sketches celebrating, in the words of Edward Said, “the power of culture over the culture of power.”

RECKLESS DAUGHTER: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell by David Yaffe
Out: June 13
A biography, with dozens of in-person interviews with Mitchell, reveals the backstory behind the famous songs—from her youth on the Canadian prairie, the child she gave up for adoption, through her albums and love affairs, to the present.

I WAS TOLD TO COME ALONE: My Journey Behind the Lines of Jihad by Souad Mekhennet
Out: June 13
The daughter of a Turkish mother and a Moroccan father, born and educated in Germany, Mekhennet reports from the Middle East to North Africa to explain the rise of Islamic radicalism.

FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL: A True Love Story by Peter Turner
Out: May 2
This memoir recounts a story of friendship, love and stardom that began when Turner’s former lover, Hollywood actress Gloria Grahame, collapsed in a Lancaster hotel, and he took her into his eccentric family’s home in Liverpool. Soon to be a major feature film starring Annette Bening, Jamie Bell, Julie Walters, and Vanessa Redgrave.

JACK AND NORMAN: A State-Raised Convict and the Legacy of Norman Mailer’s “The Executioner’s Song” by Jerome Loving
Out: Feb. 21
The tragic behind-the-scenes story of Norman Mailer’s Pulitzer Prize–winning classic, THE EXECUTIONER’S SONG, and his relationship with Jack Henry Abbott, who the author helped get out of prison and publish his book, IN THE BELLY OF THE BEAST, after which Abbott murdered a waiter and fled to Mexico before being recaptured and imprisoned.

Mysteries & Thrillers (full list)

DOWN A DARK ROAD by Linda Castillo (a Top 10 pick)
Out: July 11
Crime and religion collide in Castillo’s ninth Kate Burkholder mystery. The police chief of Painters Mill, Ohio, must track down an Amish man convicted of murdering his wife who has escaped from prison and taken his five children hostage.

ECHOES IN DEATH by J.D. Robb (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 7
The 44th novel featuring Lt. Eve Dallas from Robb (the pseudonym of Nora Roberts), a tale of murder and high society in a future Manhattan, shows why she dominates bestseller lists.

WOLF ON A STRING by Benjamin Black (a Top 10 pick)
Out: June 6
Black, the pen name of the Man Booker Prize–winning novelist John Banville, is the author of the Quirke mystery series set in 1950s Ireland and a Philip Marlowe pastiche, THE BLACK-EYED BLONDE. Now he turns his eye on 16th-century Prague in a tale of murder and magic.

BASED ON A TRUE STORY by Delphine de Vigan, trans. by George Miller
Out: May 9
In this metafictional psychological thriller, Delphine, a successful novelist, meets L.L., an intuitive woman who promises to cure her writer’s block. As their lives become more and more entwined, L. threatens Delphine’s identity, both as a writer and as an individual.

SIX FOUR by Hideo Yokoyama, trans. by Jonathan Lloyd-Davies
Out: Feb. 7
For five days in January 1989, the parents of a seven-year-old Tokyo schoolgirl listened to the demands of their daughter’s kidnapper. They would never see their daughter again. Fourteen years later, a press officer notices an anomaly in the case.

TOWER DOWN: A Kirk McGarvey Novel by David Hagberg
Out: May 16
A freelance killer, code-named Al-Nassar, blows the supports on a pencil tower in Manhattan and sends it crashing down. CIA legend McGarvey believes that someone in the Saudi Arabian government is behind the attack.

Poetry (full list)

AFTERLAND by Mai Der Vang (a Top 10 pick)
Out Apr. 4
The 2016 Walt Whitman Award–winner devastatingly describes the Hmong exodus from Laos; the fate of thousands of refugees, including her family; and Hmong resilience in exile.

I AM FLYING INTO MYSELF: Selected Poems, 1960–2014 by Bill Knott, edited by Thomas Lux (a Top 10 pick)
Out: Feb. 14
Arranged by his friend, poet Thomas Lux, Knott’s work—encompassing surrealistic wordplay, the antipoem, sonnets, sestinas, and haikus—all convenes in this inventive and brilliant book. readmoreremove

PW Best Books of 2016

We’re barely into November, yet Publishers Weekly has already released their Best Books of 2016 list. Here are the Macmillan gems that made the cut:

Top 10 (full list)
WHAT BELONGS TO YOU by Garth Greenwell
GUILTY THING: A Life of Thomas De Quincey by Frances Wilson

Fiction (full list)
WHAT BELONGS TO YOU by Garth Greenwell
HOT MILK by Deborah Levy

Mystery/Thriller (full list)
DON’T TURN OUT THE LIGHTS by Bernard Minier
A GREAT RECKONING by Louise Penny
REDEMPTION ROAD by John Hart

Poetry (full list)
LOOK by Solmaz Sharif

Comics (full list)
ROSALIE LIGHTNING by Tom Hart

Nonfiction (full list)
GUILTY THING: A Life of Thomas De Quincey by Frances Wilson
ENOUGH SAID: What’s Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics by Mark Thompson
GHETTO: The Invention of a Place, the History of an Idea by Mitchell Duneier
THE LONELY CITY: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone by Olivia Laing
LOVE FOR SALE: Pop Music in America by David Hajdu
A RAGE FOR ORDER: The Middle East in Turmoil, from Tahrir Square to ISIS by Robert F. Worth

Lifestyle (full list)
THE ART OF WAITING by Belle Boggs

Young Adult (full list)
IF I WAS YOUR GIRL by Meredith Russo

Check out our Edelweiss collection of Macmillan’s Best Books of 2016 for collection development made easy. We’ll update it as more “Best of 2016” lists come in.

Holt Celebrates 150 Years!

HoltLogoHoly smokes, Henry Holt & Company is 150 this year! (We see your awesome tweets via #Holt150!)

Founded in 1866 by Henry Holt and Frederick Leypoldt, the imprint focused exclusively on publishing translations and textbooks. A fruitful relationship with Robert Frost began in 1915 with the publication of NORTH OF BOSTON, and his books became a mainstay for the company and anchored a prestigious poetry list, with five collections eventually winning the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. By the mid-twentieth century the company boasted a diverse and strong trade list (including children’s books), publishing classics by Norman Mailer, Dee Brown, Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Philip Caputo, Robert Olen Butler, and W. E. B. Dubois, who won two Pulitzer Prizes.

Holtzbrinck (now Macmillan) purchased the company in 1985, and the tradition of award-winning publishing continues into the 21st century, with a list that includes the two-time Man Booker Prize-winner Hilary Mantel, Nobel Prize-winner Herta Müller, and Pulitzer Prize-winners Rick Atkinson and Elizabeth Kolbert. Holt—under the imprints Henry Holt, Metropolitan Books (celebrating its 20th anniversary), and Holt Paperbacks—publishes literary fiction, history, biography, politics, current events, science, psychology, and mysteries and thrillers, by authors such as Bill O’Reilly (the Killing series), Rick Atkinson (The Liberation Trilogy), Paul Auster, Noam Chomsky, Andy Cohen, Barbara Ehrenreich, Atul Gawande, Coretta Scott King, and Elizabeth Warren.

We’re thrilled to celebrate by giving away 5 prize packs of Holt 150 totes full of 5 notable books by Hilary Mantel, Bill O’Reilly, Diane Guerrero, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Susan Faludi to lucky librarians!

To enter the giveaway, simply email Library@MacmillanUSA.com from your professional/library-issued e-mail address (subject: Holt 150) by Friday, September 2. Make sure to include your library’s mailing address to be placed in the random drawing.*

UPDATE 9/7/16: This giveaway is now closed. Congratulations to our winners:
Elena S. Feiza, Algonquin Area Public Library District, Algonquin IL
Cindy Levine, Winston Salem State University, O’Kelly Library, Winston-Salem NC
Carla Hollar, Swannanoa Public Library, Swannanoa NC
Anna Brinegar, Huntington City-Township Public Library, Huntington IN
Carol Hanan, Pendergraft Library and Technology Center, Russellville AR

For more, read Publishers Weekly‘s feature story on Holt’s 150th anniversary, including notable milestones from the company’s history.
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PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2016

Drawn from the 14,000+ titles in Publishers Weekly‘s Fall Announcements issue (available in full here), these Macmillan titles are PW‘s Most Anticipated Books of Fall 2016:
Fiction

HERE I AM by Jonathan Safran Foer
Unfolding over four tumultuous weeks in present-day Washington, D.C., Foer’s first novel in 11 years is the story of a fracturing family in a moment of crisis.

Mystery/Thriller/Crime

THE ONE MAN by Andrew Gross
Bestseller Gross revisits the horrors of WWII in this thriller involving an Allied plot to rescue an atomic physicist from Auschwitz.

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror

INVISIBLE PLANETS: Contemporary Chinese Science Fiction in Translation edited and trans. by Ken Liu
This stellar anthology of 13 stories selected and translated by Liu (the Dandelion Dynasty series) brings the best of Chinese science fiction to anglophones.

EVERFAIR by Nisi Shawl
In this deeply compelling debut novel, Shawl takes readers to an alternate Earth where the inhumane history of the Belgian Congo is brilliantly rewritten when Africa’s indigenous populations learn about steam power.

Comics/Graphic Novels

THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984–1985: A Graphic Memoir by Riad Sattouf
Sattouf’s dark-humored memoir of his dysfunctional family and childhood in Syria continues.

Literary Essays/Criticism/Biographies

GUILTY THING: A Life of Thomas De Quincey by Frances Wilson
The riches-to-rags story of the last of the romantics—a 19th-century opium eater, celebrity journalist, and professional doppelgänger. readmoreremove

The Giant 2016 Graphic Novel Roundup!

The saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words” and that’s certainly true of graphic novels. Thanks to comic book characters dominating pop culture, the format has been enjoying a boom and readers are coming to the medium in droves.

Publishers Weekly recently profiled graphic novel publisher Papercutz, which publishes between 50 and 60 books per year, mostly aimed at children ages 8–12. Their Super Genius imprint publishes books for teen readers and a new imprint called Charmz, aimed at pre-teen & early teen girls, will launch in May 2017.

Papercutz’s catalog includes bestselling licensed media properties, such as Barbie, Dennis the Menace, the Smurfs, Lego’s Ninjago and Bionicle series (though Lego moved the licenses to Little, Brown last year), a line of classic Disney graphic novels (DANTE’S INFERNO becomes MICKEY’S INFERNO, and X-MICKEY features X-Files-type supernatural escapades), as well as graphic novels based on a first-look deal with children’s TV network Nickelodeon.

Papercutz also rebooted select classics (WUTHERING HEIGHTS, THE JUNGLE, and THE INVISIBLE MAN to name a few) with artwork from acclaimed contemporary artists such as Rick Geary, Peter Kuper, and Gahan Wilson. Their first list in 2005 featured a manga-style graphic novel revival of the classic Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys adventure series, which are still in print and have together sold more than 800,000 copies.

Foreign imports are big, including France’s popular Ariol series by Emmanuel Guibert and Guillaume Bianco, and Antonello Dalena’s Ernest and Rebecca series. Italy’s bestselling prose series starring a time-traveling squirrel named Geronimo Stilton has done so well in the U.S. that Italy ran out of books and now Papercutz creates them.

Original graphic novels were an organic movement from the Geronimo Stilton books and Papercutz’s first original title was Deb Lucke’s THE LUNCH WITCH, followed by THE RED SHOES AND OTHER STORIES by Sandra Marrs and John Chalmers who create comics under the name Metaphrog. This November the house is publishing TRISH TRASH: Rollergirl of Mars, a YA SF graphic novel offering diversity—the book has a multiracial heroine—that was originally published in France but created by noted American cartoonist Jessica Abel.

The initial Charmz line (S’17) will simultaneously release the first four graphic novels in a planned series:
* CHLOE by Greg Tessier and Amandine, the story of a girl who is navigating life at a new school
* STITCHED by Mariah Huehner and Aaron Alexovich, a supernatural tale about a rag-doll girl who wakes up in a cemetery and must figure out who she is
* SWEETIES, based on Cathy Cassidy’s Chocolate Box Girls novels and adapted by Veronique Grisseaux and Anna Merli, about a girl who acquires four half-sisters when her father remarries
* THE GREAT COSMIC RACE by Amy Chu and Agnes Garbowska, a SF adventure story featuring an interstellar scavenger hunt, a smart girl, and an alien shapeshifter

Meanwhile, Library Journal offered their Graphic Novels Preview 2016 and noted many trends, starting with…
FEMALE CREATORS

Women writers and artists have historically been under­represented in graphic novels, but that seems poised to change based on the number of high-profile titles set for release in the coming year, ranging from humor to journalism to memoir and beyond. Among the most highly anticipated is Lynda Barry’s THE GREATEST OF MARLYS (Drawn & Quarterly, Aug.), a collection concentrating on one of best-selling Barry’s most beloved characters, eight-year-old Marlys. Through Marlys, Barry delves into the highs and lows of childhood and adolescence, capturing in unflinching detail the amusement and the horror of coming of age.

Lisa Hanawalt, perhaps best known as the designer behind the distinctive look of the animated Netflix series BoJack Horseman, moves fluidly between wit and pathos in HOT DOG TASTE TEST (Drawn & Quarterly, Jun.). While Hanawalt explores (and explodes) foodie culture in this new book, she also investigates relationships, identity issues, and more, all delivered in beautiful watercolors and an original and immensely funny voice.

Slightly less provocative but no less interesting an exploration of one artist’s quest for self-expression is Lucy Knisley’s memoir SOMETHING NEW: Tales from a Makeshift Bride (First Second, May), which details Knisley’s ventures in putting her own stamp on every facet of her wedding, from sewing her own dress to building the very barn in which the ceremony was held.

JOURNALISM AND NONFICTION

Riad Sattouf’s THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE, VOL. 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984–1985 (Holt, Sept.), the sequel to THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1978–1984, continues the author’s experiences moving among France, Libya, and Syria as a child. The second book finds the Sattoufs settled in Syria and struggling against obstacles both local and political.

Also exploring the Middle East, specifically the legacy of the Iraq War, is Sarah Glidden’s ROLLING BLACKOUTS (Drawn & Quarterly, Oct.), in which the author describes her travels as a journalist in Turkey, Iraq, and Syria.

FROM ABROAD

Graphic novels in translation continue to be massively popular, especially those originally published in Japanese. While the late Shigeru Mizuki is not the legend that [Osamu] Tezuka is, he is an important figure in his own right, and fans should be excited about Drawn & Quarterly’s THE BIRTH OF KITARO (May), the first of six volumes that will bring the Kitaro character to the United States for the first time. readmoreremove

PW Fall 2015 Announcements

It’s still summer, but Publishers Weekly is looking ahead to Fall 2015. They recently selected their best of the best in a whopping 16 different categories and we’ve gathered all 90(!!!) Macmillan standouts into a handy Edelweiss collection and listed them here for you:

Art, Architecture & Photography: People and Places
HUMANS OF NEW YORK: STORIES by Brandon Stanton (a Top 10 pick)
The follow-up to Stanton’s bestseller, HUMANS OF NEW YORK, presents photos of a new group of humans, complete with stories that delve deeper and surprise with greater candor.

MYSTERIES OF THE MALL by Witold Rybczynski (a Top 10 pick and two starred reviews)
Architecture critic Rybczynski casts a seasoned eye over the modern metropolitan scene, examining cities, public places, and homes.

NEXTINCTION by Ralph Steadman and Ceri Levy
Steadman, a cartoonist and friend of the feathered, gives his unique take on critically endangered birds.

PATTERNALIA: An Unconventional History of Polka Dots, Stripes, Plaid, Camouflage, & Other Graphic Patterns by Jude Stewart
A book on patterns, with illustrations from polka dots to plaid: their histories, cultural resonances, and hidden meanings.

Business
THE GLOBAL CODE: How a New Culture of Universal Values Is Reshaping Business and Marketing by Clotaire Rapaille
The bestselling author of THE CULTURE CODE explains why global marketing and business must evolve to acknowledge new, universally held human values.

Comics & Graphic Novels: Graphic Lives
KILLING AND DYING by Adrian Tomine (a Top 10 pick)
A masterful anthology of Tomine’s recent work showcases various art styles to explore modern anxiety and mortality. Each tiny panel is its own universe of repressed emotion and foiled desire.

STEP ASIDE, POPS: A Hark! a Vagrant Collection by Kate Beaton (a Top 10 pick)
Beaton’s first collection was a sensation, and these comics are equally droll, brainy, and sometimes devastating. Her broadsides against clueless chauvinism are especially dead on.

PUKE FORCE by Brian Chippendale
Social satire written dark and dense across Chippendale’s deconstructed multiverse of walking, talking M&Ms, hamsters, and cycloptic-yet-glamorous trivia hosts. A bomb explodes in a coffee shop: the incident is played out over and over again from the perspective of each table in the shop.

Cooking & Food: Cooking from Far and Wide
SIMPLY NIGELLA by Nigella Lawson (a Top 10 pick)
Internationally bestselling author Lawson returns to the basics with everyday recipes that make our lives easier and make us feel better, more alive, and less stressed.

SPUNTINO: Comfort Food (New York Style) by Russell Norman
The bestselling author of POLPO showcases new mouthwatering recipes and stories from Spuntino, the New York–influenced diner in London that’s been wildly successful.

AUTHENTIC PORTUGUESE COOKING: More than 185 Classic Mediterranean-Style Recipes of the Azores, Madeira and Continental Portugal by Ana Patuleia Ortins
This collection of over 200 recipes highlights the traditional flavors of Portugal.

THUG KITCHEN PARTY GRUB GUIDE: For Social Motherf*ckers by Thug Kitchen
From the duo behind the blog and the New York Times bestseller THUG KITCHEN comes the next installment of recipes with a side of attitude.

THE BLUE BLOODS COOKBOOK by Wendy Howard Goldberg and Bridget Moynahan
More than 100 hearty, soulful comfort food recipes from the CBS television cop show Blue Bloods center around the Reagan family dinner; compiled by the show’s star, Bridget Moynahan.

Sports & Entertainment: All American—from Soul Music to Football
WHAT THE EYE HEARS: A History of Tap Dancing by Brian Seibert
This magisterial history shares the saga of African-Americans in show business wielding enormous influence as they grapple with the pain and pride of tap dancing’s complicated legacy. Seibert charts tap’s growth in vaudeville circuits and nightclubs, chronicles its spread to ubiquity on Broadway and in Hollywood, analyzes its post–WWII decline, and celebrates its reinvention.

I BLAME DENNIS HOPPER: And Other Stories from a Life Lived In and Out of the Movies by Illeana Douglas
Award-winning actress Douglas submits a memoir about learning to survive in Hollywood while staying true to her quirky vision of the world in a testament to the power of art, the tenacity of passion, and the profound effect of how one movie can change our destiny.

PETTY: The Biography by Warren Zanes
Tom Petty, known for his reclusive style, has shared with rocker, writer, and friend Zanes his insights and arguments, his regrets and lasting ambitions, and the details of his life on and off the stage. The book is honest and evocative of Petty’s music and the remarkable rock and roll history he and his band helped to write.

FRANK & AVA: In Love and War by John Brady
The love story of Frank Sinatra and Ava Gardner has been told from one side or the other, it but has never been fully explored or explained—until now. Thoroughly researched and reported, this is not another storybook version of a Hollywood romance, but a compelling drama of love and emotional war that left two celebrities wounded for life.

BEAST: Blood, Struggle, and Dreams at the Heart of Mixed Martial Arts by Doug Merlino
Following four high-level MMA fighters, Merlino bluntly examines the history, culture, business, and meaning of professional cage fighting.

Essays & Literary Criticism: Looking Back
THE ART OF THE PUBLISHER by Roberto Calasso (a Top 10 pick)
The author of ARDOR should have plenty of insights to share about the business of books. His career as a publisher goes back to the beginnings of the Italian house Adelphi in the 1960s.

THE GIVENNESS OF THINGS by Marilynne Robinson (a Top 10 pick)
The author of several acclaimed novels, including GILEAD and LILA, will draw a wide audience to these 17 essays that critique our society and call for a renewed sense of grace in our lives.

THE CHALLENGE OF THINGS: Thinking Through Troubled Times by A.C. Grayling
A collection of recent writings from philosopher Grayling (THE GOD ARGUMENT) reflecting on the world in a time of war and conflict.

THE PLEASURE OF READING: 43 Writers on the Discovery of Reading and the Books that Inspired Them, edited by Antonia Fraser and Victoria Gray
Forty authors—10 of them new to this reprint of a book first published in 1992—including Margaret Atwood, Tom Stoppard, and Doris Lessing, explain what first drew, and continues to draw, them to literature.

THE ART OF PERSPECTIVE: Who Tells the Story by Christopher Castellani
The 11th entry in Graywolf’s popular Art Of series tackles every fiction writer’s most urgent issue: point of view.

CHANGING THE SUBJECT: Art and Attention in the Internet Age by Sven Birkerts
The author of THE GUTENBERG ELEGIES offers trenchant essays on the cultural consequences of continuing, all-permeating technological innovation.

MAKING A POINT: The Persnickety Story of English Punctuation by David Crystal
This volume concludes Crystal’s triumphant trilogy about the English language, combining the first history of English punctuation with a complete guide on how to use it.

Literary Fiction: More Is More
PURITY by Jonathan Franzen (a Top 10 pick and three starred reviews)
In Franzen’s first novel since FREEDOM, a young woman follows a German peace activist to South America to intern for his WikiLeaks-like organization.

A MANUAL FOR CLEANING WOMEN: Selected Stories by Lucia Berlin, edited by Stephen Emerson, foreword by Lydia Davis (three starred reviews)
The women of Berlin’s stories navigate a world of jockeys, doctors, and switchboard operators who laugh, mourn, and drink. Berlin is a highly influential writer despite having published little in her lifetime.

SUBMISSION by Michel Houellebecq, trans. by Lorin Stein
Paris, 2022. In an alliance with the socialists, France’s new Islamic party sweeps to power, and Islamic law is enforced. Women are veiled, and polygamy is encouraged.

THE WAKE by Paul Kingsnorth (An ALA Annual 2015 “Read ’N Rave” selection)
This Man Booker–longlisted novel is a postapocalyptic story set a thousand years in the past. Written in a “shadow tongue” of Old English, it follows Buccmaster, a proud landowner bearing witness to the end of his world.

ALL THAT FOLLOWED by Gabriel Urza (A PW Best of Summer 2015 selection, a Summer/Fall 2015 Indies Introduce selection, and an August 2015 Indie Next pick)
It’s 2004 in Muriga, a quiet town in Spain’s northern Basque Country, a place with more secrets than inhabitants. Five years since the kidnapping and murder of a young local politician, everyone knows who pulled the trigger, but is the convicted man the only one to blame?

THE FOX WAS EVER THE HUNTER by Herta Müller, trans. by Philip Boehm
The Nobel Prize winner’s latest: Romania at the end of the Ceausescu regime, and one of these four—schoolteacher Adina, musician Paul; factory worker Clara, and Pavel, Clara’s lover—works for the secret police and is reporting on the others.

A CLUE TO THE EXIT by Edward St. Aubyn
Charlie Fairburn, successful screenwriter, ex-husband, and absent father, has been given six months to live. He resolves to stake half his fortune on a couple of turns of the roulette wheel and, to his agent’s disgust, to write a novel—about death.

FEAR OF DYING by Erica Jong
The bestselling author delivers her first book in 10 years—a sequel to her groundbreaking novel, FEAR OF FLYING.

History: Locale Histories
GIVE US THE BALLOT: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America by Ari Berman (a Top 10 pick, an ALA Annual 2015 “Read ’N Rave” selection, and three starred reviews)
Published to coincide with the 50th anniversary of passing the Voting Rights Act, Berman’s book provides a popular history of the right to vote in America, which, according to the starred PW review, is “not only easily understandable, but riveting.”

FLOODPATH: The Deadliest Man-Made Disaster of 20th-Century America and the Making of Modern Los Angeles by Jon Wilkman
Wilkman combines urban history, a technological detective story, and life-and-death drama to tell the harrowing story of the St. Francis Dam break of 1928.

GANGSTER WARLORDS: Drug Dollars, Killing Fields, and the New Politics of Latin America by Ioan Grillo
Grillo, a Mexico City–based journalist, examines the men at the heads of drug cartels throughout Latin America: what drives them, what sustains their power, and how they can be brought down.

THE CRIME AND THE SILENCE: Confronting the Massacre of Jews in Wartime Jedwabne by Anna Bikont, trans. by Alissa Valles
A dual story of the massacre told through oral histories of survivors and witnesses, and a portrait of a Polish town coming to terms with its dark past.

THE OTHER PARIS by Luc Sante
Sante reveals the city’s hidden past and its seamy underside—populated by working and criminal classes that, though virtually extinct today, have shaped Paris over the past two centuries.

MASTERS OF EMPIRE: Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America by Michael A. McDonnell
Historian McDonnell recounts the pivotal role the native peoples of the Great Lakes played in the history of North America.

CITY OF THORNS: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp by Ben Rawlence
A humanitarian and journalist provides an insider account of Dabaab, in Kenya, the world’s largest and best-known refugee camp, and tells its human story.

Lifestyle: Down to Earth
THE BEST ADVICE IN SIX WORDS: Writers Famous and Obscure on Love, Sex, Money, Friendship, Family, Work, and Much More by Larry Smith (a Top 10 pick)
Even readers who normally shun self-help should be drawn to this collection of very brief advice for the wit promised by contributors such as Daniel Handler and Gary Shteyngart.

RUN TO LOSE: A Complete Guide to Weight Loss for Runners by Jennifer Van Allen and Pamela Nisevich Bede (a Top 10 pick)
The diet industry may thrive on continual innovation, but it’s hard to beat techniques that go back millennia, as outlined by the experts from Runner’s World magazine.

THE MICRONUTRIENT MIRACLE: The 28-Day Plan to Lose Weight, Increase Your Energy, and Reverse Disease by Jayson Calton, Ph.D., and Mira Calton, C.N.
An innovative guide to reversing illness and common ailments by tackling hidden nutritional deficiencies.

BEEKMAN 1802 STYLE: The Attraction of Opposites by Brent Ridge and Josh Kilmer-Purcell
With three successful cookbooks under their belts, the Beekman Boys partner with Country Living magazine to share their home design tips, tricks, and resources, along with an extensive collection of images from the couple’s historic farmhouse home. readmoreremove

Publishers Weekly’s Best of Summer 2015

Spring may have finally arrived, but Publishers Weekly is already on to summer! Check out their list of the Best Summer Books of 2015, which include:

STAFF PICKS
THE ARGONAUTS by Maggie Nelson
“Reading Nelson is like sweeping the leaves out of your mental driveway: by the end of one of her books, you have a better understanding of how the world works. THE ARGONAUTS is about her relationship with Harry Dodge, her pregnancy, and becoming a mother, and it’s supplemented with references to Roland Barthes, The Shining, Anne Carson, Atari games, and more. The result is one of the most intelligent, generous, and moving books of the year.” — Gabe Habash, deputy reviews editor

ALL THAT FOLLOWED by Gabriel Urza
“A foreign setting that’s just exotic enough (the Basque region of Spain), a terrible crime (kidnapping and murder), a small town with complicated history and delicious superstitions (fear of la Cerda, a woman who was burned to death in a furnace as a witch during the Spanish Inquisition for holding gatherings where young girls cavorted with the Devil), and a beautiful widow are just some of the elements that make this intriguing literary debut a book to while away a summer afternoon with. The narrator is an American who has lived in the village for 50 years but acknowledges that he ‘would always be considered a foreigner here, a visitor passing through.’ Aren’t we all?” — Louisa Ermelino, reviews director
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