Articles tagged "Publishers Weekly"

Publishers Weekly Spotlight on Somaiya Daud

Somaiya Daud, author of MIRAGE (available August 28, 2018 from Flatiron Books and Macmillan Audio), was featured in Publishers Weekly earlier this month.

In the feature, Daud discusses the role that her Moroccan heritage plays in the novel, specifically the inspiration she found in Moroccan poet Laabi Abdellatif.

“‘I’d known that poetry could be and often was a form of dissent,’ Daud says, ‘but it took on new meaning as I wrote this novel because I was drawing so heavily on my Moroccan roots to shape the world.’ With the assistance of her mother and her aunt, Daud sought out and translated poems from Arabic-speaking women to include in the novel, bringing these works to an audience who likely would not have read them otherwise. For [the main character,] Amani, as her days as a prisoner in the imperial palace become increasingly bleak, the poems [in the novel] serve as ‘a light in the darkness.'”

Click here to read the full article.

Check out all of our 2018 Books for Teens here.

PW Best Summer Books of 2018

Publishers Weekly recently announced their Best Summer Books of 2018, including these 9 Macmillan titles:
Top 10 (full list)

NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS, edited by Heid E. Erdrich
Rather than anthologize contemporary and emerging authors alongside classic or familiar ones, Erdrich introduces readers to 21 Native poets whose writing was first published after 2000. It’s a simple, powerful framing and all that is needed to introduce readers to a group of writers whose breadth and diversity of styles represent some of the best of contemporary poetry today. —Alex Green, New England correspondent

Fiction (full list)

BABY TEETH by Zoje Stage
Stage’s debut novel is a deviously fun domestic horror story that takes child-rearing anxiety to demented new heights. Frustrated stay-at-home mom Suzette attempts to pacify her seven-year-old daughter Hanna, who adores her father but distrusts Suzette, has dangerous tantrums, and only speaks in the voice of a 17th-century girl who was burned at the stake. As Suzette tries to connect with Hanna, Hanna plots ways to “step up her game against Mommy.”

BROTHER by David Chariandy
Set during the summer of 1991 in the Park, a housing complex in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, Chariandy’s powerful and incendiary novel tracks the coming of age of two mixed-heritage brothers. Sensitive Michael fumbles through his first relationship while volatile Francis becomes obsessed with the burgeoning hip-hop scene. Chariandy imbues his resilient characters with strength and hope.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Cusk’s final book in a trilogy (after OUTLINE and TRANSIT) expertly concludes the story of protagonist British author Faye. Like its predecessors, the novel eschews chronicling Faye’s life via traditional narrative, instead filling each page with conversations with and monologues by the many writers, journalists, and publicists she meets during her travels. As always, Cusk’s ear for dialogue and language is stunning. The author ends Faye’s trilogy with yet another gem.

Mystery (full list)

CAGED by Ellison Cooper
In her debut thriller, Cooper, an anthropologist who has worked as a murder investigator in Washington, D.C., channels “equal parts Kathy Reichs and Thomas Harris” (according to Lisa Gardner). In the basement of a D.C. house, a woman is found dead in a cage—left to slowly starve to death in a cold and calculating experiment with no clear motive. readmoreremove

April 2018 All-Stars

These books are swimming in stars—make sure to add them to your shelves ASAP!

WITCHMARK by C.L. Polk

“Polk’s stellar debut, set in an alternate early 20th century in an England-like land recovering from a WWI-like war, blends taut mystery, exciting political intrigue, and inventive fantasy . . . The final revelations are impossible to see coming and prove that Polk is a writer to watch for fans of clever, surprising period fantasy.”Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Polk has created an amazing new world with hints of Edwardian glamour, sizzling secrets, and forbidden love that crescendos to a cinematic finish. WITCHMARK is a can’t-miss debut that will enchant readers.” —Booklist, starred review

SONG OF BLOOD & STONE: Earthsinger Chronicles, Book One by L. Penelope

“Penelope delivers an engrossing story with delightful characters in this fantastic opening to a promising series . . . The tale is infused with optimism but never cloying, and it culminates in a well-earned and satisfying ending, leaving readers impatient for the next installment of the series.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

This debut . . . shines a bright light into epic fantasy. Battle-scarred lands and peoples, ancient powers at war, star-crossed loves and hints of racial and refugee themes give this a solid place on library shelves.”Library Journal, starred review

MOTHERHOOD by Sheila Heti

A May Indie Next Pick! 

“This lively, exhilaratingly smart, and deliberately, appropriately frustrating affair asks difficult questions about women’s responsibilities and desires, and society’s expectations.”Publishers Weekly, starred review

“As her character seeks and ultimately chooses, as she must, the aspects of life and art she’ll lay claim to, Heti writes with courage, curiosity, and uncommon truth: ‘To go along with what nature demands and to resist it—both are really beautiful—impressive and difficult in their own ways.'” Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

PW’s Writers to Watch Spring 2018: Anticipated Debuts

Publishers Weekly‘s most anticipated debuts of Spring 2018 include these three Macmillan standouts:

PEACH by Emma Glass
Emma Glass began writing her debut novel, PEACH (Bloomsbury, out now), about a young woman who struggles to resume ordinary life after being assaulted, a little less than a decade ago while she was studying creative writing at the University of Kent in the U.K. For her final assignment, Glass had to write the first 4,000 words of a novel. The prompt was open-ended, but the program, she says, put special emphasis on plot-driven, commercially viable narratives, which she had little affinity for.

“I’ve never been particularly good at coming up with stories,” Glass says. In her frustration, and with the deadline approaching, she put on some music and started simply writing “words”—not even sentences. “I was surprised at what came out,” Glass, now 30, says. “It felt like it was something different.”

Glass, who is at work on her second novel, has kept her job as a nurse. People sometimes ask her whether PEACH, with its visceral bodily imagery, was influenced by her career in medicine. The answer is no. “That kind of grotesque violence, I’m afraid, is all my own,” she says.

THE TRANSITION by Luke Kennard
When the British poet Luke Kennard was writing his first novel, THE TRANSITION (FSG, out now), he imagined it taking place in the very near future. But novels take years to write, and the future arrives more quickly than we expect. Now, the themes at the center of the book—millennial hopelessness, financial precariousness—feel scarily current. “A lot of things it explores have been superseded by reality,” Kennard jokes. readmoreremove

PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018

Publishers Weekly‘s “Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018” include these 8 Macmillan titles:
Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror

THE MERRY SPINSTER by Mallory Ortberg
Ortberg’s twisted variations on popular fairy tales and children’s books are daring and skillful, and this outstanding collection of them brims with satirical horror.

WITCHMARK by C.L. Polk
This stellar debut, set in an alternate early 20th century, is an innovative mix of class struggle, magic, and war that marks Polk as a writer to watch.

Poetry

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
The current U.S. poet laureate challenges the nature of citizenship, motherhood, and what it means to be an artist in a culture mediated by wealth, men, and violence.

Comics/Graphic Novels

BLAME THIS ON THE BOOGIE by Rina Ayuyang
Ayuyang chronicles the real-life adventures of a Filipino-American girl born in the decade of disco who escapes life’s hardships and mundanity through the genre’s feel-good song-and-dance numbers.

Memoir

EAT THE APPLE by Matt Young
This bold memoir explores “how war transformed [Young] from a confused teenager into a dangerous and damaged man.”

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
The former FBI director shares for the first time the details of his career in government during the past two decades. readmoreremove

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (psst… it’s Oscar)

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME is nominated for four Academy Awards!

Best Picture
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Actor in a Leading Role (Timothée Chalamet)
Best Original Song (“Mystery of Love,” music and lyrics by Sufjan Stevens)

The Oscar Awards Ceremony will take place on March 4th.

Bestseller Lists Roundup (as of 1/22/18):
New York Times paperback fiction: 2 weeks (best rank #8)
USA Today: 4 weeks (#37)
Los Angeles Times: 6 weeks (#1)
Amazon Top 50: 4 weeks (#17)
iBooks: 3 weeks (#5)
Indie National: 1 week (#14)
Regional Indie: All 9 lists for most recent week
Publishers Weekly frontlist trade paperback: 4 weeks (#6)

See André Aciman on national tour!

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PW’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction Picks

Publishers Weekly‘s Spring 2018 literary fiction picks include 8 titles from Macmillan:
Top 10

THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
Hannah’s novel, starred by PW, follows the Allbright family, who barely make ends meet, as they move from 1974 Seattle to the untamed wilderness of Kaneq, Alaska, to claim a parcel of land left to the father by a slain Army buddy.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Following OUTLINE and TRANSIT, this novel completes Cusk’s trilogy: a woman writer visits a Europe in flux, where questions of personal and political identity rise to the surface.

THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat
Tamirat’s debut is a coming-of-age story about a girl in Boston’s tightly knit Ethiopian community who falls under the influence of a charismatic hustler. The novel received a starred PW review. readmoreremove

All-in-One “Best Books of 2017”

*drumroll please* For your collection development joy, here are all of our “Best Books of 2017” lists in one place!

Publishers Weekly

Kirkus Reviews Fiction, Nonfiction, Teen

Library Journal — Best Books of 2017 & Notable Books of 2017

School Library Journal‘s Best Adult Books 4 Teens

Booklist Editors’ Choice 2017

New York Times Book Review Top 10 & Editor’s Choice picks

New York Times Notable Books

Washington Post

Los Angeles Times

People Magazine

Time Magazine

GQ Magazine

Vulture (New York Magazine)

Huffington Post

Buzzfeed

NPR’s Book Concierge

Goodreads Choice Awards nominees

Chicago Public Library “Best of the Best of 2017

See all these titles in Macmillan’s Best Books of 2017 Edelweiss collection. #CollectionDevelopmentMadeEasy

PW’s Best Books of 2017

Publishers Weekly‘s Best Books of 2017 list includes 20 Macmillan titles:

Top 10 (full list)
ANTS AMONG ELEPHANTS: An Untouchable Family and the Making of Modern India by Sujatha Gidla
FEAR CITY: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein
GRIEF COTTAGE by Gail Godwin

Fiction (full list)
BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado
MARLENA by Julie Buntin
THE SEVENTH FUNCTION OF LANGUAGE by Laurent Binet
GRIEF COTTAGE by Gail Godwin

Poetry (full list)
DON’T CALL US DEAD by Danez Smith

SF/Fantasy/Horror (full list)
THE BEDLAM STACKS by Natasha Pulley

Comics (full list)
BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
MY LESBIAN EXPERIENCE WITH LONELINESS by Nagata Kabi

Nonfiction (full list)
ANTS AMONG ELEPHANTS: An Untouchable Family and the Making of Modern India by Sujatha Gidla
THE EXILE: The Stunning Inside Story of Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda in Flight by Cathy Scott-Clark and Adrian Levy
THE GOURMANDS’ WAY: Six Americans in Paris and the Birth of a New Gastronomy by Justin Spring
I WAS TOLD TO COME ALONE: My Journey Behind the Lines of Jihad by Souad Mekhennet
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.
THE SECRET LIFE: Three True Stories of the Digital Age by Andrew O’Hagan
FEAR CITY: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein

Lifestyle (full list)
THE HUNGRY BRAIN: Outsmarting the Instincts That Make Us Overeat by Stephan Guyenet

Check out our Edelweiss collection of Macmillan’s Best Books of 2017 for collection development made easy. We’ll update it as more “Best of 2017” lists come in.

PW Best Books of Summer 2017

PWSummer2017Publishers Weekly’s editors recently selected their Best Books of Summer 2017, including these seven Macmillan titles:
Staff Picks (full list)

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
“About that thing on the cover—is it a genetically modified bird-of-paradise? Some cousin of the odoriferous corpse flower? I was intrigued from the moment I saw it, as is Rachel, the postapocalyptic scavenger who finds the improbably sentient and mutable creature—who ‘smelled of beach reeds on lazy summer afternoons and, beneath the sea salt, of passionflowers’—while picking through the fur of the gargantuan flying bear that terrorizes her devastated city. And then things start to get weird.” — Carolyn Juris, features editor

ISADORA by Amelia Gray
“Gray’s most recent book, the story collection GUTSHOT, was weird as hell and as visceral as its title. Whose life would be better for her to fictionalize, then, than that of notorious mother of modern dance Isadora Duncan? An openly bisexual communist and atheist in an era that condemned all three, Duncan was famous for wearing long, flowing scarves even up until her death, when her scarf got caught in one of the axles of the car she was riding in. Flung from the vehicle, Duncan died of a broken neck—a tragic end that will surely make for a riveting finale in Gray’s novel.” — John Maher, assistant news editor

Fiction (full list)

THE PEOPLE WE HATE AT THE WEDDING by Grant Ginder
Ginder takes family dysfunction to its hysterical limit in this joyously ribald novel about siblings Alice and Paul begrudgingly attending the lavish wedding of their half-sister, Eloise, in England. Lovesick Alice and Paul—both in doomed relationships—see Eloise as the snotty daughter of a rich dad, and Donna, their mother, as a coldhearted widow who ditched all remnants of their father after his death. During the boozy pre-wedding days, the resentment and secrets come tumbling out in outbursts and hilariously bad decisions. readmoreremove

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