Articles tagged "Publishers Weekly"

Teen Talk (7/16/2018 Edition)

Happy Monday, YA Librarians!

Check out our latest & greatest YA and YA-OK titles out this month, then join us on Twitter today at 2:30pm EST for Early Word YA Galley Chat (hashtag: #ewgcya) and tell us what you’ve been reading & loving!

I’M NOT MISSING by Carrie Fountain
9781250132512
Ages 13 to 18
When Miranda Black’s mother abandoned her, she took everything and Miranda found shelter in her friendship with Syd, who wore her own motherlessness like a badge of honor. But when Syd runs away suddenly and inexplicably in the middle of their senior year, Miranda is abandoned once again, left to untangle the questions of why Syd left and learning what it means to be truly seen, to be finally not missing in her own life.

“The ending is really a beginning as [Miranda] finds both support and inner resilience. A beautiful new voice to watch.” —Kirkus Reviews

“This thoughtful coming-of-age tale tenderly explores the great pain and power of forging one’s own identity as well as the inescapable influence of loved ones, even those who choose to be lost.” —The Horn Book

30 BEFORE 30: How I Made a Mess of My 20s, and You Can Too by Marina Shifrin
9781250129710
A charming, relatable and hilarious collection of essays documenting a young woman’s attempt to accomplish thirty life goals before turning thirty. In 30 BEFORE 30, Marina takes readers through her list and shares personal stories about achieving those goals. Ranging in scope from the simple (Donate Hair) to the life-changing (Become internet Famous), each story shows readers that we don’t all have it figured out, and that’s okay.

“In Shifrin’s journey to confidence and success, she provides a genuinely inspirational example without ever taking herself too seriously.” —Publishers Weekly readmoreremove

PW’s Writers to Watch Fall 2018: Anticipated Debuts

Publishers Weekly‘s most anticipated debuts of Fall 2018 include these three Macmillan standouts:

THE GOLDEN STATE by Lydia Kiesling
In Lydia Kiesling’s THE GOLDEN STATE (MCD, Sept.), a mother goes with her toddler to a region of northeast California in the grips of a secessionist movement. Before settling on that subject, however, Kiesling says she “wanted to write a bureaucracy novel, which is a huge formal challenge.” She scrapped it but sees a connection between administrative work and child rearing. “Motherhood is its own form of boredom,” she notes.

Kiesling’s thrilling handling of that boredom attracted her editor, Emily Bell. “I was first drawn into THE GOLDEN STATE by the pacing and energy of the writing—to create such mighty momentum in a book that’s grappling with the tedium of motherhood is enormously impressive to me,” Bell says.

SHE WOULD BE KING by Wayétu Moore
The first draft of Wayétu Moore’s SHE WOULD BE KING (Graywolf, Sept.), a magical realist account of the founding of Liberia, was twice the length and more fantastical than the final version. “So, there was an alien narrator,” Moore says, laughing. “I recognized that I was asking a lot of the reader, so I cut it in half and toned down the magical realism/fantasy/sci-fi elements.”

Ranging across a Virginia plantation, Jamaica, and Liberia, the novel follows three characters, each of whom is blessed with a supernatural gift and whose paths converge in the burgeoning republic. “Liberia was this beautiful experiment about what would happen if you bring people together from Africa and the Caribbean and America,” says Moore, who with her sister cofounded One Moore Book, a publishing nonprofit seeking to “create more books for those underrepresented readers who are most vulnerable.” readmoreremove

Teen Talk (6/14/2018 Edition)

Happy Thursday, YA librarians!

Check out our latest & greatest teen titles out this month, then join us on Twitter today at 2:30pm EST for Early Word YA Galley Chat (hashtag: #ewgcya) and tell us what you’ve been reading & loving!

KISSING GAMES by Tara Eglington
9781250075260
Ages 12 to 18
After a perfect first kiss, Aurora’s second kiss lands her boyfriend in the hospital, and her matchmaking strategies start to backfire in this sequel to HOW TO KEEP A BOY FROM KISSING YOU. When Aurora’s best friend decides to run for class president and offers up Aurora’s matchmaking service as one of her campaign initiatives, the kissing games begin. Aurora has to convince everyone that her program works—but that might be hard to do when it seems like her own love life might be falling apart.

“This light, dreamy, and easy read is filled with strong character development as the teens find their way in their everyday lives.” —School Library Journal

BRING ME THEIR HEARTS by Sara Wolf
9781640631465
Ages 14 and up
Zera is a Heartless—the immortal, unageing soldier of a witch. Bound to the witch Nightsinger ever since she saved her from the bandits who murdered her family, Zera longs for freedom from the woods they hide in. With her heart in a jar under Nightsinger’s control, she serves the witch unquestioningly . . . until Nightsinger asks Zera for a Prince’s heart in exchange for her own. So begins a game of cat and mouse between a girl with nothing to lose and a boy who has it all. Winner takes the loser’s heart. Literally.

“Zera is an exemplar of confident, capable, relentlessly witty young womanhood. She is assertive, proactive, and, above all, a fun character to follow . . . ” —Kirkus Reviews

Also available this month in trade paperback from Flatiron Books:

IF I WAS YOUR GIRL by Meredith Russo
9781250078414
Ages 13 to 18
Amanda Hardy is the new girl in school in Lambertville, Tennessee. Like anyone else, she wants to make friends and fit in. But Amanda has a secret. She’s determined not to get too close to anyone. Because the secret that Amanda’s been keeping? At her old school, she used to be Andrew. IF I WAS YOUR GIRL is an award-winning, bighearted novel about being seen for who you really are, and a love story you can’t help rooting for.

“Above all, this is a necessary, universal story about feeling different and enduring prejudices, and it’s full of love, hope, engaging writing, and truth.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

AFTERCARE INSTRUCTIONS by Bonnie Pipkin
9781250114853
Ages 12 to 18
“Troubled.” That’s seventeen-year-old Genesis according to her small New Jersey town. She finds refuge and stability in her relationship with her boyfriend, Peter—until he abandons her at a Planned Parenthood clinic during their appointment to terminate an unwanted pregnancy. The betrayal causes Gen to question everything. This powerfully immersive and format-crushing debut follows Gen from dorm rooms to diners to house parties to auditions—and ultimately, right into readers’ hearts.

“Genesis’s conflicted relationships with her mother, grandparents, and friends are as engrossing as her breakup with Peter, and her story packs a big emotional punch.” —Publishers Weekly

Check out all of our 2018 Books for Teens!

PW Spotlight on Araminta Hall

We know you love Araminta Hall—her new book, OUR KIND OF CRUELTY, is a May 2018 LibraryReads pick (available now from MCD/FSG and Macmillan Audio), and so does Publishers Weekly.

In a fascinating interview, Hall discussed her decision not to tell both sides of the story between her two young lovers…

“Switching perspectives almost would have been the easy thing to do, and then I just thought, what I’m writing about is how society judges women, and we still live in a very male society.”

…her unusual sources of inspiration—the Amanda Knox case and the 2016 presidential election…

“It really spurred me on because Hillary was judged so harshly, while Trump was caught on tape literally bragging about sexual assault. It’s that disparity between how women are expected to behave and be perfect, and men can be so much less than perfect.”

…and on writing a first-person male narrative. readmoreremove

Publishers Weekly Spotlight on Somaiya Daud

Somaiya Daud, author of MIRAGE (available August 28, 2018 from Flatiron Books and Macmillan Audio), was featured in Publishers Weekly earlier this month.

In the feature, Daud discusses the role that her Moroccan heritage plays in the novel, specifically the inspiration she found in Moroccan poet Laabi Abdellatif.

“‘I’d known that poetry could be and often was a form of dissent,’ Daud says, ‘but it took on new meaning as I wrote this novel because I was drawing so heavily on my Moroccan roots to shape the world.’ With the assistance of her mother and her aunt, Daud sought out and translated poems from Arabic-speaking women to include in the novel, bringing these works to an audience who likely would not have read them otherwise. For [the main character,] Amani, as her days as a prisoner in the imperial palace become increasingly bleak, the poems [in the novel] serve as ‘a light in the darkness.'”

Click here to read the full article.

Check out all of our 2018 Books for Teens here.

PW Best Summer Books of 2018

Publishers Weekly recently announced their Best Summer Books of 2018, including these 9 Macmillan titles:
Top 10 (full list)

NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS, edited by Heid E. Erdrich
Rather than anthologize contemporary and emerging authors alongside classic or familiar ones, Erdrich introduces readers to 21 Native poets whose writing was first published after 2000. It’s a simple, powerful framing and all that is needed to introduce readers to a group of writers whose breadth and diversity of styles represent some of the best of contemporary poetry today. —Alex Green, New England correspondent

Fiction (full list)

BABY TEETH by Zoje Stage
Stage’s debut novel is a deviously fun domestic horror story that takes child-rearing anxiety to demented new heights. Frustrated stay-at-home mom Suzette attempts to pacify her seven-year-old daughter Hanna, who adores her father but distrusts Suzette, has dangerous tantrums, and only speaks in the voice of a 17th-century girl who was burned at the stake. As Suzette tries to connect with Hanna, Hanna plots ways to “step up her game against Mommy.”

BROTHER by David Chariandy
Set during the summer of 1991 in the Park, a housing complex in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, Chariandy’s powerful and incendiary novel tracks the coming of age of two mixed-heritage brothers. Sensitive Michael fumbles through his first relationship while volatile Francis becomes obsessed with the burgeoning hip-hop scene. Chariandy imbues his resilient characters with strength and hope.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Cusk’s final book in a trilogy (after OUTLINE and TRANSIT) expertly concludes the story of protagonist British author Faye. Like its predecessors, the novel eschews chronicling Faye’s life via traditional narrative, instead filling each page with conversations with and monologues by the many writers, journalists, and publicists she meets during her travels. As always, Cusk’s ear for dialogue and language is stunning. The author ends Faye’s trilogy with yet another gem.

Mystery (full list)

CAGED by Ellison Cooper
In her debut thriller, Cooper, an anthropologist who has worked as a murder investigator in Washington, D.C., channels “equal parts Kathy Reichs and Thomas Harris” (according to Lisa Gardner). In the basement of a D.C. house, a woman is found dead in a cage—left to slowly starve to death in a cold and calculating experiment with no clear motive. readmoreremove

April 2018 All-Stars

These books are swimming in stars—make sure to add them to your shelves ASAP!

WITCHMARK by C.L. Polk

“Polk’s stellar debut, set in an alternate early 20th century in an England-like land recovering from a WWI-like war, blends taut mystery, exciting political intrigue, and inventive fantasy . . . The final revelations are impossible to see coming and prove that Polk is a writer to watch for fans of clever, surprising period fantasy.”Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Polk has created an amazing new world with hints of Edwardian glamour, sizzling secrets, and forbidden love that crescendos to a cinematic finish. WITCHMARK is a can’t-miss debut that will enchant readers.” —Booklist, starred review

SONG OF BLOOD & STONE: Earthsinger Chronicles, Book One by L. Penelope

“Penelope delivers an engrossing story with delightful characters in this fantastic opening to a promising series . . . The tale is infused with optimism but never cloying, and it culminates in a well-earned and satisfying ending, leaving readers impatient for the next installment of the series.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

This debut . . . shines a bright light into epic fantasy. Battle-scarred lands and peoples, ancient powers at war, star-crossed loves and hints of racial and refugee themes give this a solid place on library shelves.”Library Journal, starred review

MOTHERHOOD by Sheila Heti

A May Indie Next Pick! 

“This lively, exhilaratingly smart, and deliberately, appropriately frustrating affair asks difficult questions about women’s responsibilities and desires, and society’s expectations.”Publishers Weekly, starred review

“As her character seeks and ultimately chooses, as she must, the aspects of life and art she’ll lay claim to, Heti writes with courage, curiosity, and uncommon truth: ‘To go along with what nature demands and to resist it—both are really beautiful—impressive and difficult in their own ways.'” Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

PW’s Writers to Watch Spring 2018: Anticipated Debuts

Publishers Weekly‘s most anticipated debuts of Spring 2018 include these three Macmillan standouts:

PEACH by Emma Glass
Emma Glass began writing her debut novel, PEACH (Bloomsbury, out now), about a young woman who struggles to resume ordinary life after being assaulted, a little less than a decade ago while she was studying creative writing at the University of Kent in the U.K. For her final assignment, Glass had to write the first 4,000 words of a novel. The prompt was open-ended, but the program, she says, put special emphasis on plot-driven, commercially viable narratives, which she had little affinity for.

“I’ve never been particularly good at coming up with stories,” Glass says. In her frustration, and with the deadline approaching, she put on some music and started simply writing “words”—not even sentences. “I was surprised at what came out,” Glass, now 30, says. “It felt like it was something different.”

Glass, who is at work on her second novel, has kept her job as a nurse. People sometimes ask her whether PEACH, with its visceral bodily imagery, was influenced by her career in medicine. The answer is no. “That kind of grotesque violence, I’m afraid, is all my own,” she says.

THE TRANSITION by Luke Kennard
When the British poet Luke Kennard was writing his first novel, THE TRANSITION (FSG, out now), he imagined it taking place in the very near future. But novels take years to write, and the future arrives more quickly than we expect. Now, the themes at the center of the book—millennial hopelessness, financial precariousness—feel scarily current. “A lot of things it explores have been superseded by reality,” Kennard jokes. readmoreremove

PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018

Publishers Weekly‘s “Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2018” include these 8 Macmillan titles:
Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror

THE MERRY SPINSTER by Mallory Ortberg
Ortberg’s twisted variations on popular fairy tales and children’s books are daring and skillful, and this outstanding collection of them brims with satirical horror.

WITCHMARK by C.L. Polk
This stellar debut, set in an alternate early 20th century, is an innovative mix of class struggle, magic, and war that marks Polk as a writer to watch.

Poetry

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
The current U.S. poet laureate challenges the nature of citizenship, motherhood, and what it means to be an artist in a culture mediated by wealth, men, and violence.

Comics/Graphic Novels

BLAME THIS ON THE BOOGIE by Rina Ayuyang
Ayuyang chronicles the real-life adventures of a Filipino-American girl born in the decade of disco who escapes life’s hardships and mundanity through the genre’s feel-good song-and-dance numbers.

Memoir

EAT THE APPLE by Matt Young
This bold memoir explores “how war transformed [Young] from a confused teenager into a dangerous and damaged man.”

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
The former FBI director shares for the first time the details of his career in government during the past two decades. readmoreremove

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (psst… it’s Oscar)

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME is nominated for four Academy Awards!

Best Picture
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Actor in a Leading Role (Timothée Chalamet)
Best Original Song (“Mystery of Love,” music and lyrics by Sufjan Stevens)

The Oscar Awards Ceremony will take place on March 4th.

Bestseller Lists Roundup (as of 1/22/18):
New York Times paperback fiction: 2 weeks (best rank #8)
USA Today: 4 weeks (#37)
Los Angeles Times: 6 weeks (#1)
Amazon Top 50: 4 weeks (#17)
iBooks: 3 weeks (#5)
Indie National: 1 week (#14)
Regional Indie: All 9 lists for most recent week
Publishers Weekly frontlist trade paperback: 4 weeks (#6)

See André Aciman on national tour!

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