Articles tagged "Philip Marlowe"

For Your Consideration: August 2017 LibraryReads Titles

Aug17LRcollageDownload, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the August 2017* LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due June 20! Click here for the full list of 2017 deadlines.

GLASS HOUSES by Louise Penny
When a mysterious figure appears on the village green on a cold November day in Three Pines, Armand Gamache, now Chief Superintendent of the Sûreté du Québec, knows something is seriously wrong. But, legally, all he can do is watch and wait. “Last year’s A GREAT RECKONING [was] a LibraryReads pick that was No. 1 on the New York Times hardcover fiction, ebook fiction, and combined-format best sellers lists.” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

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EMMA IN THE NIGHT by Wendy Walker
Bestselling and LibraryReads author Wendy Walker returns with a thriller about two missing sisters and what happens when only one returns. “Walker’s second thriller delves into dark territory, pitting a fully dimensional cast of clever, damaged characters against each other in high-stakes mind games. Both twisted and twisty, this smart psychological thriller sets a new standard for unreliable narrators.” — Booklist, starred review

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GONE GULL by Donna Andrews
“An Agatha, Anthony, and Barry Award winner (and LibraryReads author), Andrews takes us to the Biscuit Mountain Craft Center, where series heroine Meg Langslow is helping out her grandmother for the summer. Vandalism and a dead body distract from her duties, even as she joins her grandfather in his search for a rare gull. Sweet!” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

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GONE TO DUST by Matt Goldman
The debut PI murder mystery from Emmy Award-winning TV writer Matt Goldman featuring an unusual crime—a murdered woman is covered in dust from hundreds of vacuum cleaner bags. “Goldman’s experience as a stand-up comic, playwright, and TV writer show to advantage in this first novel’s wit, the story’s pace, and his hero’s charm. Offer this one (the start of a proposed series) to aficionados of chilly Scandinavian noir and the new generation of Philip Marlowe fans.” — Booklist
BONUS: Read our Q&A with Matt Goldman!

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In the Hot Seat: Matt Goldman on GONE TO DUST

Today we turn the spotlight on Matt Goldman, whose debut novel, GONE TO DUST, features an unusual crime—a murdered woman is found covered in dust from hundreds of vacuum cleaner bags, rendering DNA evidence useless.

Library Journal‘s Books for Dudes column called it, “hard-boiled awesomeness” and Booklist said, “Offer this one to aficionados of chilly Scandinavian noir and the new generation of Philip Marlowe fans.”

Macmillan Library: Hi Matt, and thanks for joining us for a Q&A on the blog today! Before we talk about your debut mystery, GONE TO DUST, let’s start with your credentials. You began your career as a stand-up comedian and are now a playwright and Emmy Award-winning television writer for Seinfeld, Ellen, and other shows. You must do so much writing for your day job, why write a novel?

Matt Goldman: I love writing and I’m a first-degree introvert. So much of television writing is done in a roomful of writers. Not the actual script writing (usually), but conceiving characters and stories. Much of the rewriting is also done in a group. Especially in comedy. TV writing and writers have taught me so much about character, story, pace, dialogue, and series construction, I wouldn’t trade a minute of it. But for my personality, it’s exhausting trying to track all those words in the air. I love the process of book writing—I find it energizing. And it’s a chance to write my voice without concern for other writers, actors, studios, and networks.

ML: Was it harder or easier for you to write GONE TO DUST vs writing for TV? What are some of the major differences?

MG: Some of the differences I explained above. I guess I don’t look at it as hard vs. easy. They have their tradeoffs by that measurement. It’s a more whole and rewarding experience for me to write books. I’m a serial daydreamer. That serves me better as a novelist than it does in a room where I’m supposed to be paying attention.

ML: Did you have specific inspirations as you wrote GONE TO DUST? It’s lighthearted, but has a very noir feel.

MG: I started reading the mystery/crime genre relatively recently. When I read Raymond Chandler, I saw how my voice could work in telling those kinds of stories. Chandler’s voice and style are different from mine, and his skill far outweighs mine, but he did inspire me to sit down and give it a shot. readmoreremove

Booklist’s Best Crime 2015

 

May is Mystery Month over at Booklist and to celebrate they’ve put together “Best of” reading lists with loads of Macmillan titles!
Plus, Booklist Reader has a special feature on one of our favorite mystery authors…

The Year’s Best Crime Novels: 2015

THE LONG WAY HOME by Louise Penny
With her beloved series hero, former Montreal Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, now retired, Penny moves from finding reasons to get Gamache back to his beloved village of Three Pines to taking him on a road trip, first to Europe and then to the wilds of Canada’s upper St. Lawrence River. As always, Penny dexterously combines suspense with psychological drama, overlaying the whole with an all-powerful sense of landscape as a conduit to meaning. Another gem from an endlessly inventive writer.

THE WHITES by Harry Brandt
Richard Price returns as Harry Brandt with the story of Billy Graves, an aging NYPD cop who suspects that one of his cronies in the Wild Geese, a legendary anti-crime unit from the nineties, may now be killing the crooks who got away back in the day. With one-of-a-kind characters and settings so real you can smell them, The Whites isn’t about cops and killers as much it’s about the damage we all carry, the sins we’ve all committed, and the heartbreaking unlikeliness of forgiveness. An unrelenting, moving story of crime and social justice.

Best Crime Fiction Debuts

AN APPETITE FOR VIOLETS
by Martine Bailey

Set in the 1770s, Bailey’s debut stars Biddy Leigh, undercook at Mawton Hall in Cheshire, England, who accompanies the master’s wife on a trip to Italy, where she falls in love with a chef and is thrown into a murder case. A delectable dish for foodies and the Downton Abbey crowd.

NIGHT OF THE JAGUAR by Joe Gannon
Gannon places a classic hard-boiled detective in the middle of 1980s Nicaragua, with its poisonous politics, and tells the story of the times in emotion-drenched, wonderfully lyrical prose.

Top 10 Crime Fiction Audiobooks

THE BLACK-EYED BLONDE by Benjamin Black, read by Dennis Boutsikaris
Boutsikaris steps into Marlowe’s shoes as he narrates the search for a dead man who might not be dead at all. Set in the 1950s and true to Chandler’s creation, this is a memorable visit to the mean streets. readmoreremove

Thriller Thursday (3/6/14 Edition)

Today we've got a super-sized #ThrillerThursday with mysteries to satisfy every reader, from cozies to psychological suspense and more! 

PRECIOUS THING by Colette McBeth
A March 2014 Library Reads pick! "Debut author McBeth’s GONE GIRL-style psychological thriller will be a widespread hit for fans of dark drama with questionable narrators, including S. J. Watson’s BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP (2011), Sabine Durrant’s UNDER YOUR SKIN (2013), and Karen Perry’s THE INNOCENT SLEEP (2013)." Booklist, starred review

THE BLACK-EYED BLONDE by Benjamin Black
Black's "pitch-perfect recreation" of Raymond Chandler's incomparable private eye Philip Marlowe goes "beyond mere thoughtful homage" (Publishers Weekly, starred review) when a seductive young heiress asks Marlowe to find her former lover. "Great fun for Chandlerians." — Booklist 

CITY OF DARKNESS AND LIGHT by Rhys Bowen
In the 13th entry of Bowen's New York Times bestselling historical series, Molly Murphy and her infant son are in Paris where she unexpectedly gets entangled in the murder of an Impressionist artist. "Molly is a smart, feisty heroine who admirably defends her investigation to a very skeptical Sûreté. Though placed a decade or so earlier, this breezy historical mystery will appeal to fans of Carola Dunn’s Daisy Dalrymple and Jacqueline Winspear’s Maisie Dobbs." — Booklist  

THE PLAYER by Brad Parks
In the latest book in Parks' award-winning series, Carter Ross investigates a suspicious disease, but it takes him down a path that leads directly into the arms of the local mob boss. "Parks, a gifted storyteller (with shades of Mark Twain, or maybe Dave Barry), shows his mastery of the comic absurd behind serious journalism in his fifth outing." — Library Journal, starred review  

WRECKED by Tricia Fields
"Fields’ third Josie Gray outing is emotionally taut, building to a breathtaking climax and portraying, in the process, the danger inherent in a Texas border town and presenting Josie, previously wary of commitment, with new challenges. More fine southwestern crime fiction by an author who clearly loves the locale." Booklist, starred review  

PROVIDENCE RAG by Bruce DeSilva
“Edgar-winner DeSilva melds moral dilemmas with a suspenseful plot in his third novel featuring Providence, R.I.–based reporter Liam Mulligan, his best yet.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review
“Mulligan’s character, played off the vicissitudes of his job, is skillfully layered and engaging. DeSilva, who worked for decades at the AP, won an Edgar for Best First Novel for ROGUE ISLAND (2010). He knows of what he writes.” Booklist, starred review

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Sneak Peek: The March 2014 Indie Next list

Indie Next logoWe're shaking off the winter blues with great news: we've got four fantastic books on the March 2014 Indie Next list, including the #1 pick!

SHOTGUN LOVESONGS by Nickolas Butler (#1 Pick!)
Butler's atmospheric debut novel about the relationship between four friends in a little Wisconsin town is an ABA Spring 2014 Indies Introduce selection, a Maximum Shelf Awareness feature, and a "love letter to the Midwest." (Publishers Weekly)

RUNNER by Patrick Lee
There's a good reason we've been hyping this new thriller starring retired special forces operative Sam Dryden–it's got three starred reviews, sold international rights in seven countries, and the film rights were optioned by Warner Brothers with director Justin Lin (Fast & Furious 6) attached. (Now can we pleeeease get Channing Tatum to star?!)

THE WIVES OF LOS ALAMOS by TaraShea Nesbit
Nesbit's debut novel about the wives of the men who created the atom bomb is also an ABA Spring 2014 Indies Introduce selection, a Barnes & Noble Spring 2014 Discover Great New Writers selection, and has two great starred reviews with major media coverage to come.

THE BLACK-EYED BLONDE by Benjamin Black
Black's "pitch-perfect recreation" of Raymond Chandler's incomparable private eye Philip Marlowe goes "beyond mere thoughtful homage" (Publishers Weekly, starred review) when a seductive young heiress asks Marlowe to find her former lover.

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