Articles tagged "Paris"

New Historical Fiction

Happy Monday, friends! We’re kicking off the week with these two new historical novels:

THE TYPEWRITER’S TALE by Michiel Heyns
A novel told from the perspective of Henry James’s fictional typist, Frieda Wroth, who becomes caught up in the friendships and rivalries at James’s house. “Faithfully re-created real-life individuals mix well with authentically drawn fictitious ones.” — Booklist, starred review

THE WHITE RUSSIAN by Vanora Bennett
An enchanting, suspenseful novel of love, art, music, and family secrets set among the Russian émigré community of Paris in 1937. “Bennett offers an intriguing picture of Russian refugees in Paris in the 1930s and a convincing portrayal of Evie’s evolution from naive girl to confident woman.” — Booklist

Happy #BookBday (11/29/16 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to three great new reads:

NORMAL by Warren Ellis
LR iconA November 2016 LibraryReads pick & December 2016 Indie Next pick! In this provocative near-future techno-thriller, a foresight strategist (a.k.a.: people who think about geoengineering and smart cities and ways to evade Our Coming Doom) arrives at Normal Head in the wilds of Oregon to unplug and recover, when a patient goes missing from his locked bedroom, leaving nothing but a pile of insects in his wake. “A crackling, funny, and frightening horror story from a unique voice in genre lit.” — Kirkus Reviews

TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP by Beatrice Colin
A December 2016 Indie Next pick & Maximum Shelf Awareness selection! Set against the construction of the Eiffel Tower, this novel charts the relationship between a young widow and an engineer who, despite constraints of class and wealth, fall in love. “Hauntingly melancholic in places, Colin’s story moves like wisps of fog through Parisian streets, capturing moments of both gaiety and tragedy. This exquisitely written, shadowy historical novel will appeal to a wide variety of readers, including fans of the Belle Époque.” — Library Journal, starred review readmoreremove

Sneak Peek: December 2016 Indie Next List

indie nextThe December 2016 Indie Next list includes three Macmillan titles!

TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP by Beatrice Colin
Set against the construction of the Eiffel Tower, this novel charts the relationship between a young widow and an engineer who, despite constraints of class and wealth, fall in love. “Hauntingly melancholic in places, Colin’s story moves like wisps of fog through Parisian streets, capturing moments of both gaiety and tragedy. This exquisitely written, shadowy historical novel will appeal to a wide variety of readers, including fans of the Belle Époque.” — Library Journal, starred review

NORMAL by Warren Ellis
In this provocative near-future techno-thriller, a foresight strategist (a.k.a.: people who think about geoengineering and smart cities and ways to evade Our Coming Doom) arrives at Normal Head in the wilds of Oregon to unplug and recover, when a patient goes missing from his locked bedroom, leaving nothing but a pile of insects in his wake. “A crackling, funny, and frightening horror story from a unique voice in genre lit.” — Kirkus Reviews
readmoreremove

Happy Early #BookBday (10/17/16 Edition)

We’re wishing these four new books a happy #BookBday one day early, because you can never start to party too soon!

THE NEXT by Stephanie Gangi
A November 2016 Indie Next pick, a Library Journal “Summer Promise Debut Novels” pick & BEA 2016 “Shout ‘n Share” selection! This haunting debut novel is narrated by the ghost of Joanna DeAngelis, a woman who plots revenge on her much-younger ex-boyfriend. “THE NEXT is fast-paced and engrossing reading for anyone who has entertained revenge fantasies (so much easier when you’re a ghost) and for readers of dysfunctional family fiction with some humor, like Jonathan Tropper’s THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU.” — Booklist

BORDERS by Roy Jacobsen
A brilliantly layered, sweeping novel of World War II set in the Ardennes—a forested, mountainous borderland that spans France, Germany, Belgium, and Luxembourg—about the impossible choices between familial love and national identity. “An artful deconstruction of nationalism through the prism of personal loss and reconciliation. Read Jacobsen’s novel carefully to savor its images and themes.” — Kirkus Reviews

LES PARISIENNES: How the Women of Paris Lived, Loved, and Died Under Nazi Occupation by Anne Sebba
New York Times bestselling author Sebba explores a devastating period in Paris’s history and tells the stories of how women survived—or didn’t—during the Nazi occupation. “Former Reuters correspondent and biographer, most notably of Wallis Simpson (THAT WOMAN, 2012), turns in a fascinating account of how the buildup to WWII, the war itself, and its aftermath marked the lives of Parisian women. A standout social history.” — Booklist, starred review

KNIVES & INK: Chefs and the Stories Behind Their Tattoos (with Recipes) by Isaac Fitzgerald & Wendy MacNaughton
From the authors of PEN & INK—bestselling illustrator Wendy MacNaughton and BuzzFeed books editor Isaac Fitzgerald—the stories behind the tattoos chefs proudly wear, with signature recipes. “The best entries in this collection are about tattoos that show the passion and dedication each person brings to their craft in the kitchen. Readers are sure to devour this in a single sitting.” — Publishers Weekly

Maximum Shelf: TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP

maxshelf-tocaptureToday’s Maximum Shelf Awareness feature is TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP by Beatrice Colin.

In her second novel to be published in the U.S., TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP weaves together the story of the tower’s daring construction with the personal life of Eiffel’s right-hand man, Émile Nouguier, and the Scotswoman with whom he falls in love.

“Colin’s moody, atmospheric novel captures both the idealism and the frustration of trying to chase one’s dreams, trying to fashion a more compelling life or simply realize an artistic vision. For those who have visited Paris or enjoy traveling to the City of Light on the page, TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP provides a captivating glimpse into the origin story of a cherished Parisian icon.” — Shelf Awareness

Praise for TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP:

“Hauntingly melancholic in places, Colin’s story moves like wisps of fog through Parisian streets, capturing moments of both gaiety and tragedy. This exquisitely written, shadowy historical novel will appeal to a wide variety of readers, including fans of the Belle Époque.” — Library Journal, starred review

“Colin has a sure hand with the atmospheres of both cities and with the mores and dress of the period, and she manages to continually raise the stakes for her characters without ever resorting to melodrama. A novel of soaring ambitions, public and private.” — Kirkus Reviews

Click here to read the full Shelf Awareness summary, review and full interview with Beatrice Colin. readmoreremove

Monet, Madames & the Mitford Sisters

Take a deep dive into the history of Monet, women in WWII Paris, and the Mitford Sisters in these three enthralling nonfiction titles:

MAD ENCHANTMENT: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies by Ross King
A BEA 2016 “Shout ‘n Share” pick with THREE starred reviews! “Best-selling King consummately meshes biography with art history as he turns the creation of one resounding masterpiece into a portal onto the artist’s life. Never before has the full drama and significance of Monet’s magnificent Water Lilies been conveyed with such knowledge and perception, empathy and wonder.” — Booklist, starred review

LES PARISIENNES: How the Women of Paris Lived, Loved, and Died Under Nazi Occupation by Anne Sebba
New York Times bestselling author Sebba explores a devastating period in Paris’s history and tells the stories of how women survived—or didn’t—during the Nazi occupation. “Former Reuters correspondent and biographer, most notably of Wallis Simpson (THAT WOMAN, 2012), turns in a fascinating account of how the buildup to WWII, the war itself, and its aftermath marked the lives of Parisian women. A standout social history.” — Booklist, starred review

THE SIX: The Lives of the Mitford Sisters by Laura Thompson
An enthralling biography of the Mitford sisters, daughters of the British aristocracy whose lives took different directions at the onset of WWII, all rife with scandal, controversy, and tragedy. “For readers yearning for another take on the glamorous sisters’ ‘posh past,’ Thompson’s smart, jaunty, and wittily entertaining book will amply fill their desire. Steeped in Mitford lore and mythmaking, the book offers sharply drawn portraits of each woman, teases out the complexities of their fraught, competitive relationships with one another, and sets their lives within the context of a radically changing world. ” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

For Your Consideration: November 2016 LibraryReads Titles

Nov16LRcollageDownload, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the November 2016* LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due September 20! Click here for the full list of 2016 deadlines.

TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP by Beatrice Colin
Set against the construction of the Eiffel Tower, this novel charts the relationship between a young widow and an engineer who, despite constraints of class and wealth, fall in love. “Hauntingly melancholic in places, Colin’s story moves like wisps of fog through Parisian streets, capturing moments of both gaiety and tragedy. This exquisitely written, shadowy historical novel will appeal to a wide variety of readers, including fans of the Belle Époque.” — Library Journal, starred review

NetGalleyLogoAvailable on NetGalley. To be pre-approved for an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “To Capture What We Cannot Keep.”*

THIS HOUSE IS MINE by Dörte Hansen
A bestseller in Germany, Hansen’s debut novel is about two strong-willed and very different women who have a connection around a special old house: Vera, a refugee who arrived from East Prussia in 1945, and her niece Anne, who shows up at the house 60 years later with her small son. “Hansen makes this story about the process of healing affecting, real, and memorable.” — Publishers Weekly

download review copy edelweissDownload the e-galley from Edelweiss

NORMAL by Warren Ellis
In this provocative near-future techno-thriller, a foresight strategist (a.k.a.: people who think about geoengineering and smart cities and ways to evade Our Coming Doom) arrives at Normal Head in the wilds of Oregon to unplug and recover, when a patient goes missing from his locked bedroom, leaving nothing but a pile of insects in his wake. “A crackling, funny, and frightening horror story from a unique voice in genre lit.” — Kirkus Reviews

download review copy edelweissDownload the e-galley from Edelweiss

THE INHERITANCE by Charles Finch
“In the 10th installment of this Victorian-era series, a Member of Parliament–turned–private detective gets the chance to solve a 30-year-old mystery that involves his boyhood friend. Finch impressively raises the stakes of this tale between tea settings, and his character development is top-notch.” — Kirkus Reviews

download review copy edelweissDownload the e-galley from Edelweiss

UNDER THE MIDNIGHT SUN by Keigo Higashino
Two starred reviews! From acclaimed international bestseller and LibraryReads author Higashino comes a compelling story of a twenty-year-old murder, two teenagers linked by the crime, and a detective’s obsession to finally uncover the truth. “Edgar-nominated Higashino revisits the dangerous codependence of bonds forged in murder with this complex, elegant psychological thriller. A starkly rendered portrayal of modern Japanese culture that will draw fans of fellow Japanese thriller master Natsuo Kirino’s novels and the haunting Scandinavian tales of Karin Fossum.” — Booklist, starred review

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Thriller Thursday (2/20/14 Edition)

We're a day away from TGIF and you know what that means: #ThrillerThursday! Here's what we're reading this week:

RUNNER by Patrick Lee
You know how much Anne loves this "high-tech thriller that's hard to put down" (Library Journal, starred review) because she can't stop recommending it to anyone who will listen (hey casting directors: Channing Tatum!). She's not the only one–it's a March Indie Next pick, has three starred reviews, and the adoration of Lee Child, Steve Berry and Nelson DeMille. 

THE INNOCENT SLEEP by Karen Perry
This psychological thriller about a couple restarting their lives five years after losing their son in a tragic accident is perfect for those of you who enjoyed the March 2014 LibraryReads pick, PRECIOUS THING. "This novel, with a premise that taps into the fears of every parent, is an entertaining thriller that fans of Tana French and Gillian Flynn will enjoy." — Library Journal  
(get the free downloadable praise sheet)

DEAD WATER by Ann Cleeves
In the eagerly awaited new entry in Ann Cleeves' popular Shetland Islands series (now airing on BBC as the television series Shetland), Detective Inspector Willow Reeves and Inspector Jimmy Perez team up to investigate the murder of a journalist. "Cleeves has an unusually deft hand with characters; not one of them seems purely plot-functional, and Perez’s character keeps deepening with each book." — Booklist, starred review

BROTHERHOOD OF FEAR by Paul Grossman
It's 1933 and famed detective Willi Kraus is avoiding deportation back to Nazi Germany when he finds himself unwittingly drawn into a murder mystery in Paris. "Grossman again manages to make the past come alive, and his complicated investigator displays enough depth and frailty to warrant continued exploits, even without the series’ initial hook of a Jewish cop fighting for justice under the Nazis." — Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

A Thrilling Debut

Do you or your patrons like your thrillers with a European twist? Then give The Killer, written by British scriptwriter Tom Hinschelwood.

It just received a starred review in PW, which included this glowing praise, "Thriller fans will be eager to see more from this bright new talent."

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