Articles tagged "nonfiction"

July 2018 Nonfiction

Check out our great new nonfiction titles available this month—then make sure they get checked out at your library!

CITY OF DEVILS: The Two Men Who Ruled the Underworld of Old Shanghai by Paul French
Two starred reviews! “Drugs, gambling, vice, and banditry power China’s seaport mecca in this rollicking true crime saga. French’s two-fisted prose—‘When Boobee hops on a bar stool, lights an opium-tipped cigarette, and crosses her long legs, the sound of a dozen tensed-up male necks swinging round is like… a gunshot’—makes this deep noir history unforgettable.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE POISONED CITY: Flint’s Water and the American Urban Tragedy by Anna Clark
Two starred reviews! “In this complex, exquisitely detailed account, freelance journalist and Detroit Free Press contributor Clark draws on interviews, emails, and other materials to describe the ensuing [Flint, Michigan, water] catastrophe… A potent cautionary tale of urban neglect and indifference. Infuriated readers will be heartened by the determined efforts of protesters and investigative reporters.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

THE COST OF LIVING: A Working Autobiography by Deborah Levy
A searching examination of all the dimensions of love, marriage, mourning, and kinship from two-time Booker Prize finalist Deborah Levy. “This timely look at how women are viewed (and often dismissed) by society will resonate with many readers, but particularly with those who have felt marginalized or undervalued.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

I SEE LIFE THROUGH ROSÉ COLORED GLASSES: True Stories and Confessions by Lisa Scottoline & Francesca Serritella
Also available in audio
“Novelist Scottoline and daughter Serritella team up for the eighth in a series of entertaining mother-daughter humor books, combining entries in their ‘Chick Wit’ column for the Philadelphia Inquirer and new material. This summer beach read—which is indeed ‘like a glass of rosé, between two covers’—is sure to cheer readers spanning the generations but will be of particular appeal to mothers and daughters.” — Publishers Weekly

June 2018 Nonfiction

Add these June nonfiction titles to your library’s shelves today:

THE THIRD BANK OF THE RIVER: Power and Survival in the Twenty-First Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold
A veteran journalist traces the war over the Amazon as activists, locals, and indigenous tribes struggle to save the jungle from the threat of loggers, drug lords, and corrupt politicians. “A saddening, maddening story that draws much-needed attention to crime without punishment in a remote—but not invisible—part of the world.” —Kirkus Reviews

WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE: Robert F Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our unfinished Conversation About Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson
Also available in audio
A stunning follow up to TEARS WE CANNOT STOP, WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE is another timely exploration of America’s tortured racial politics. This book exists at the tense intersection of the conflict between politics and prophecy—of whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape. “After providing the backstories and historical context of the participants, Dyson offers contemporary examples of public figures who struggle for equality. The result is a moving ode to the potentiality of American social progress.” —Booklist, starred review

WHAT WOULD THE GREAT ECONOMISTS DO?: How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve Today’s Biggest Problems by Linda Yueh
A timely exploration of the life and work of world-changing thinkers—from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes—and how their ideas would solve the great economic problems we face today. “Few economics books are able to address major problems, present leading and sometimes conflicting theories, and be accessible to the casual reader. Yueh takes current issues affecting today’s economy and attacks them through the eyes of a dozen leading economists, from the historic to the contemporary, clearly applying their work to modern problems.” —Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

June is Audiobook Month

June is Audiobook Month! And our pals at Macmillan Audio are celebrating with an Instagram challenge: post a picture each day in June using the daily prompt and hashtag and they’ll repost! Share your love of audiobooks, recommendations, and beautiful #bookstagrams with us and your fellow (audio)bookworms. BTW, did you know that Macmillan Library is also now on Instagram?! Don’t forget to tag us, too!

Audiobooks have grown so popular that the New York Times created dedicated Fiction and Nonfiction audio bestseller lists! Here (or should we say, hear, haha) are some of our picks:

Fiction
THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah, read by Julia Whelan
THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen, read by Julia Whelan
(MISTBORN) THE FINAL EMPIRE by Brandon Sanderson, read by Michael Kramer readmoreremove

May 2018 Nonfiction

Pluto. Milk. Aviation. Rebellion. Social Media. Meet this month’s new nonfiction titles:

CHASING NEW HORIZONS: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto by Alan Stern & David Grinspoon
Also available in audio
One of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of Summer 2018! A behind the scenes look at the science, politics, egos and public expectations that fueled the greatest space mission of our time: NASA spacecraft New Horizons’ mission to Pluto. “This is a future classic of popular science, full of twists and turns and unexpected heroes, with a dramatic and profound payoff.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

MILK!: A 10,000-Year Food Fracas by Mark Kurlansky
Kurlansky’s first global food history since the bestselling COD and SALT; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy—with recipes throughout. “Kurlansky’s entertaining, fast-paced history of milk exhibits his usual knack for plumbing the depths of a single subject. Kurlansky’s charming history of milk brims with excellent stories and great details.” — Publishers Weekly

THE LOST PILOTS: The Spectacular Rise and Scandalous Fall of Aviation’s Golden Couple by Corey Mead
Also available in audio
“The tale of two intrepid aviators who got caught in a sordid scandal. How the pair ended up in a Miami courtroom is the subject of Mead’s colorful, fast-paced narrative, a tale of ambition, betrayal, lust, and devotion. A brisk, entertaining history of daring and passion.” — Kirkus Reviews

CHOSEN COUNTRY: A Rebellion in the West by James Pogue
Pogue provides a firsthand account of the 2016 anti-government rancher rebellion at Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. “Essential reading for insights into modern public lands politics, especially in the American West.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

Adult Books for Teens

Whether young or young at heart, these adult books are great for readers of all ages!

BUTTERFLY: From Refugee to Olympian – My Story of Rescue, hope, and Triumph by Yusra Mardini
When young Syrian refugee Yusra Mardini realized her boat’s engine shut down as she was traveling from Syria to Greece with other refugees, there was no hesitation: she dove into the water, grabbed the boat’s rope with one hand, and began inching the boat towards the distant shore. This bold act of bravery saved the lives of a boatload of refugees heading to Turkey from Syria. After her arrival in Greece, Mardini, focused and undeterred, worked toward a lifelong goal: to compete in the Olympics. She succeeded, and competed in 2016 on the Refugee Olympic Team in Rio de Janeiro.

“This unforgettable memoir shines a spotlight on the refugee experience and the role sports can play in giving a voice to those affected by conflict throughout the world.” —Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

PW Best Summer Books of 2018

Publishers Weekly recently announced their Best Summer Books of 2018, including these 9 Macmillan titles:
Top 10 (full list)

NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS, edited by Heid E. Erdrich
Rather than anthologize contemporary and emerging authors alongside classic or familiar ones, Erdrich introduces readers to 21 Native poets whose writing was first published after 2000. It’s a simple, powerful framing and all that is needed to introduce readers to a group of writers whose breadth and diversity of styles represent some of the best of contemporary poetry today. —Alex Green, New England correspondent

Fiction (full list)

BABY TEETH by Zoje Stage
Stage’s debut novel is a deviously fun domestic horror story that takes child-rearing anxiety to demented new heights. Frustrated stay-at-home mom Suzette attempts to pacify her seven-year-old daughter Hanna, who adores her father but distrusts Suzette, has dangerous tantrums, and only speaks in the voice of a 17th-century girl who was burned at the stake. As Suzette tries to connect with Hanna, Hanna plots ways to “step up her game against Mommy.”

BROTHER by David Chariandy
Set during the summer of 1991 in the Park, a housing complex in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, Chariandy’s powerful and incendiary novel tracks the coming of age of two mixed-heritage brothers. Sensitive Michael fumbles through his first relationship while volatile Francis becomes obsessed with the burgeoning hip-hop scene. Chariandy imbues his resilient characters with strength and hope.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Cusk’s final book in a trilogy (after OUTLINE and TRANSIT) expertly concludes the story of protagonist British author Faye. Like its predecessors, the novel eschews chronicling Faye’s life via traditional narrative, instead filling each page with conversations with and monologues by the many writers, journalists, and publicists she meets during her travels. As always, Cusk’s ear for dialogue and language is stunning. The author ends Faye’s trilogy with yet another gem.

Mystery (full list)

CAGED by Ellison Cooper
In her debut thriller, Cooper, an anthropologist who has worked as a murder investigator in Washington, D.C., channels “equal parts Kathy Reichs and Thomas Harris” (according to Lisa Gardner). In the basement of a D.C. house, a woman is found dead in a cage—left to slowly starve to death in a cold and calculating experiment with no clear motive. readmoreremove

April 2018 Nonfiction

Add these amazing April nonfiction titles to your library’s shelves today:

LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE by Sloane Crosley
Also available in audio
THREE starred reviews! The New York Times–bestselling author’s brand-new collection of essays is filled with her characteristic heart and punch-packing observations, but with a newfound coat of maturity. A thin coat. More of a blazer, really. “Crosley is exceedingly clever and has a witticism for all occasions, but it is her willingness to confront some of life’s darker corners with honesty and vulnerability that elevates this collection.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

PRESIDENT CARTER: The White House Years by Stuart E. Eizenstat, foreword by Madeleine Albright
THREE starred reviews! “This comprehensive, unflinching narrative and analytical treatment of Carter is essential for a new evaluation of an earnest, often exasperating, yet important figure in late 20th-century U.S. history.”Library Journal, starred review

DARWIN COMES TO TOWN: How the Urban Jungle Drives Evolution by Menno Schilthuizen
Evolutionary biologist Schilthuizen is one of a growing number of “urban ecologists” studying how man-made environments are accelerating the evolution of animals and plants. “[Schilthuizen] does a superb job of introducing important ecological principles along the way, leaving readers with a fascinating question: ‘Can we harness the power of urban evolution to use it to make more livable cities for the future?’” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE GIFT OF OUR WOUNDS: A Sikh and a Former White Supremacist Find Forgiveness After Hate by Arno Michaelis & Pardeep Singh Kaleka
The powerful story of a friendship between two men—one Sikh and one skinhead—that resulted in an outpouring of love and a mission to fight against hate. “With coauthor Fisher’s assistance, both Kaleka’s chronicling of the day of the shooting and Michaelis’ frank recounting of his former attitudes and acts make for heartbreaking reading, but their work together is inspiring and gives readers hope that the next generation can do much to heal America’s great divide.” — Booklist, starred review

SOMETHING WONDERFUL: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway Revolution by Todd S. Purdum
A revelatory portrait of the creative partnership that transformed musical theater and created the classic Broadway musicals Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I, and The Sound of Music. “Although the biographies of Rodgers and Hammerstein are naturally threaded throughout, this is much more the story of the music rather than the men. Something wonderful, indeed.” — Booklist, starred review

THE TRAUMA CLEANER: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster by Sarah Krasnostein
An “intriguing” (Publishers Weekly) debut biography of Sandra Pankhurst, a transgender woman who spends her life cleaning up after traumas, such as crime scenes and floods. “Had this uniquely gifted and nuanced chronicler of offensive odors stuck with describing the fragrance of ancient dried blood, antediluvian dust, and unspeakable effluents, Krasnostein’s debut would be memorable enough, but her subject’s life story is more remarkable and often just as harrowing as the scent of the derelict apartments she excavates for a living.” — Booklist, starred review

MINORITY LEADER: How to Lead from the Outside and Make Real Change by Stacey Abrams
Also available in audio
A guide to harnessing the strengths of being an outsider from a woman slated to become the first black female governor in the U.S. “Although there are many books on networking and achieving political and entrepreneurial success, Abrams’ is geared toward helping those who are on the fringes, especially African American women, find pathways to success and power. …this is an excellent guide that addresses setbacks and pitfalls and identifies strategies to overcome them.” — Booklist readmoreremove

Macmillan Wins Three 2018 Pulitzer Prizes!

HUGE CONGRATULATIONS to our 2018 Pulitzer Prize Winners!

Biography
PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser (Metropolitan Books)
A deeply researched and elegantly written portrait of Laura Ingalls Wilder, author of the Little House on the Prairie series, that describes how Wilder transformed her family’s story of poverty, failure and struggle into an uplifting tale of self-reliance, familial love and perseverance.

Poetry
HALF-LIGHT: Collected Poems 1965-2016 by Frank Bidart (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
A volume of unyielding ambition and remarkable scope that mixes long dramatic poems with short elliptical lyrics, building on classical mythology and reinventing forms of desires that defy societal norms.

Nonfiction
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr. (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
An examination of the historical roots of contemporary criminal justice in the U.S., based on vast experience and deep knowledge of the legal system, and its often-devastating consequences for citizens and communities of color.

And a big round of applause for our 2018 Pulitzer finalists:

Nonfiction
NOTES ON A FOREIGN COUNTRY: An American Abroad in a Post-America World by Suzy Hansen (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) readmoreremove

Friday Reads — March 2018 Nonfiction

Our #FridayReads picks are all the excellent nonfiction titles available this month!

THE SUN DOES SHINE: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row by Anthony Ray Hinton, with an introduction by Bryan Stevenson
Also available in audio
Two starred reviews! A powerful, revealing story of hope, love, justice, and the power of reading by a man who spent 30 years on death row for a crime he didn’t commit. “His memoir…is a troubling, moving, and ultimately exalting journey…. With a huge print run, Hinton’s incredible story and social-justice star Stevenson, who wrote the foreword, will draw major attention.” — Booklist, starred review

CAMP AUSTEN: My Life as an Accidental Jane Austen Superfan by Ted Scheinman
The son of a devoted Jane Austen scholar, Scheinman was determined to leave his mother’s world behind, yet nonetheless found himself in grad school organizing the first ever UNC-Chapel Hill Jane Austen Summer Camp, a weekend-long event that’s a hybrid of academic conference and superfan extravaganza. “Scheinman is a wonderful guide to the world of Austen, and this honest and thoughtful discussion of the role Austen’s works have played in his family will delight any Janeite.” — Booklist

RAW: My Journey Into the Wu-Tang by Lamont “U-God” Hawkins
The explosive, never-before-told story behind the historic rise of the Wu-Tang Clan, as told by one of its founding members, Lamont “U-God” Hawkins. “Hawkins is a wonderful storyteller who spares no detail, and his willingness to share his wisdom in nonsaccharine terms yields an inspirational coming-of-age story.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE BRIDEMAID’S DAUGHTER: From Grace Kelly’s Wedding to a Women’s Shelter – Searching for the Truth About My Mother by Nyna Giles & Eve Claxton
A daughter’s poignant search to understand her mother, Carolyn Scott—once a bridesmaid to Princess Grace and one of the first Ford models—who later chose to live for years in a homeless shelter. “A poignantly compelling memoir about family, mental health, and revisiting the past.” — Kirkus Reviews

WHERE THERE’S HOPE: Healing, Moving Forward, and Never Giving Up by Elizabeth A. Smart
Also available in audio
New York Times bestselling author, activist, and ABC News contributor Elizabeth Smart empowers those who have experience trauma to reclaim their lives and more forward with hope.

WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT: The American Presidents Series: The 27th President, 1909-1913 by Jeffrey Rosen; edited by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. & Sean Wilentz
The only man to serve as president and chief justice, who approached every decision in constitutional terms, defending the Founders’ vision against new populist threats to American democracy.

Share your #FridayReads with us @MacmillanLib. Happy weekend!

2017 Triangle Awards Finalists

We’re waving our rainbow flag in support of our 2017 Publishing Triangle Awards finalists, honoring the best LGBTQ fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as the year’s best trans and gender-variant literature:

Finalists for the Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction
ABANDON ME by Melissa Febos

Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry
SOME SAY: Poems by Maureen N. McLane

Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry
DON’T CALL US DEAD by Danez Smith
HALF-LIGHT: Collected Poems, 1965-2016 by Frank Bidart

Finalists for the Publishing Triangle Award for Trans and Gender-Variant Literature
DON’T CALL US DEAD by Danez Smith

Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado

Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado  readmoreremove

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