Articles tagged "nonfiction"

Nonfiction Round-Up (3/20/19)

Crazy ideas, literary criticism, political corruption, and a beautiful island…welcome to Nonfiction Wednesday!

LOONSHOTS: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries by Safi Bahcall
“Physicist and biotechnology entrepreneur Bahcall examines how companies, and even countries, can encourage ‘loonshots,’ which he defines as crazy ideas that are panned by critics but can become wild successes if nurtured…. This thorough, fascinating study will appeal to a broader audience than just business wonks.”–Booklist

FAR COUNTRY: Scenes from American Culture by Franco Moretti
“‘Short in pages, and compressed in style,’ according to the author, this smart collection from Moretti…takes five introductory lectures on literary history out of the classroom…. Learned without being difficult or jargony, Moretti proves that criticism can be both thought provoking and fun.”–Publishers Weekly

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Drop-In Alert! Bill O’Reilly + Trump

The Trump exposé you’ve been waiting for comes this Fall from Bill O’Reilly, the bestselling author of the Killing series, in THE UNITED STATES OF TRUMP: How the President Really Sees America.

Not a partisan pro-Trump or anti-Trump book, this is an up-to-the-minute, intimate view of the man and his sphere of influence–of “how Donald Trump’s view of America was formed, and how it has changed since becoming the most powerful person in the world”–from a writer who has known the president for thirty years. This is an unprecedented, gripping account of the life of a sitting president as he makes history.

THE UNITED STATES OF TRUMP hardcover edition available September 17, 2019 from Henry Holt & Co.
Also available in
audio.

Nonfiction Round-Up (3/13/19)

A D-Day story from those who were there, an evocative essay collection, defense of the First Amendment, and a guidebook to a better life… Welcome to this week’s Nonfiction Round-Up!

SOLDIER, SAILOR, FROGMAN, SPY, AIRMAN, GANGSTER, KILL OR DIE: How the Allies Won on D-Day by Giles Milton
“Cornelius Ryan and Stephen Ambrose have set the standard for D-Day historiography. It’s safe to say that Milton (NATHANIEL’S NUTMEG) can be now added to that list with this refreshing portrayal of how the Allies prepared, fought, lost, and won on that fateful day in 1944…. Highly recommended for World War II aficionados and those seeking a great read in military history.”–Library Journal, starred review

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Most Downloaded E-Galleys on Edelweiss!

If your TBR pile is gettin’ low, check out our list of most downloaded Edelweiss e-galleys!

GIDEON THE NINTH by Tamsyn Muir

Tamsyn Muir’s necromantic science fantasy debut is the most fun you’ll ever have with a skeleton. The Emperor needs necromancers. The Ninth Necromancer needs a swordswoman. Gideon has a sword, some dirty magazines, and no more time for undead bullshit.

THE LAST BOOK PARTY by Karen Dukess

“In late 1980s New York, aspiring writer Eve Rosen is trying to keep up her spirits as a lowly assistant when she lucks out with an invitation to an event at the Cape Cod home of New Yorker writer Henry Grey and his poet wife, Tillie. She lucks out further when she becomes Grey’s research assistant and is invited to the couple’s oh-so-chic Book Party, but soon she’s starting to think that the publishing world isn’t so glamorous after all.”–Library Journal, Pre-Pub Alert

THE MURDER LIST by Hank Phillippi Ryan

“Law student Rachel North, married to a star of Boston’s defense bar, is thrilled to be interning with the Boston DA’s office. Then the trouble starts, and she’s got to decide how to do what’s right. A stand-alone from the multi-award-winning novelist/journalist.”–Library Journal, Pre-Pub Alert

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An Interview with Jennifer Berry Hawes

After the tragic shootings at the Mother Emanuel AME church, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jennifer Berry Hawes knew this was a story that needed telling. In GRACE WILL LEAD US HOME: The Charleston Church Massacre and the Hard, Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness, she offers a moving portrait of the events and emotions that emerged in the massacre’s wake. Today, Hawes joins us to share more about her writing experience, to highlight a courageous librarian named Cynthia Hurd, and to talk about life as a Charlestonian since that terrible day in 2015.

***

How did you decide you wanted to write a book on the massacre?

I didn’t think about writing a book until five or six months after June 17, 2015. I had been covering the aftermath of the shooting for the newspaper I work for in Charleston and had begun to realize that, while the massacre itself had caused such unimaginable pain for the survivors and the victims’ loved ones, it was only the opening chapter of a much more complex story. I have since come to think of mass shootings as akin to tossing a rock into a pond. The initial impact disrupts the surface in obvious ways. But then ripple upon ripple of disruption spreads from that impact. This is what happens after these events, and happened here, from divisions among families and the church to divisions within families grappling with so much pain. Add in critical issues to our nation–race and gun violence–and this became a much more complicated story than we could tell in our newspaper. My editors agreed. As people who live and breathe Charleston, we wanted to bear witness to this deeper narrative.

Tell us a little about the librarian, Cynthia Hurd, one of the nine people killed in the church.

To me, the lush garden of climbing roses and overflowing window boxes that Cynthia meticulously tended outside of her home beautifully illustrates her essence. She was a helper, a nurturer, a warm spirit who greeted people with a wide, toothy smile. When her sister, Jackie, was diagnosed with cancer just a couple of weeks before the shooting, Jackie called Cynthia first. “I got you,” Cynthia promised, and everyone knew she meant it. When Cynthia agreed to stay at Bible study on June 17, she had plans to go with Jackie, who lived two states away, to meet with doctors and discuss her treatment options the following week.

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Lambda Award Finalists

The Lambda Literary Awards honor the best in LGBTQ books, and this year’s finalists include NINE Macmillan titles!

Gay Fiction

HISTORY OF VIOLENCE by Édouard Louis
SOME HELL by Patrick Nathan

Bisexual Fiction

THE BEST BAD THINGS by Katrina Carrasco

Gay Poetry

WILD IS THE WIND: Poems by Carl Phillips

Lesbian Mystery

A WHISPER OF BONES: A Jane Lawless Mystery by Ellen Hart

Gay Memoir/Biography

THE UNPUNISHED VICE: A Life of Reading by Edmund White

LGBTQ SF/F/Horror

THE BARROW WILL SEND WHAT IT MAY by Margaret Killjoy
THE DESCENT OF MONSTERS by JY Yang
WITCHMARK by C. L. Polk

Nonfiction Round-Up (3/6/19)

A read-alike for HEAVY and FUN HOME, the return of a Pulitzer Prize-winner, and a pivotal moment in Civil Rights history = Today’s Nonfiction picks!

BENDING TOWARDS JUSTICE:The Birmingham Church Bombing that Changed the Course of Civil Rights by Doug Jones
“This poignant and powerful story tracks changes in Southern life since the 1960s, uncovering hard truths to correct America’s moral compass with an understanding of the need for activism and political discourse to achieve social justice.”–Library Journal

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Adult Books for Teens

Booklist and School Library Journal have deemed these adult books to be great for teens . . . and we agree!

I.M. by Isaac Mizrahi
Also available in audio
Isaac Mizrahi is sui generis: designer, cabaret performer, talk-show host, a TV celebrity. He’s a pop culture icon unlike any fashion designer of recent memory, just as likely to be recognized walking down Main Street USA as Madison Avenue NYC. Yet ever since he shot to fame in the 1980s, the private Isaac Mizrahi has remained under wraps. Until now.

“A good choice for teens interested in the fashion industry, and those striving to realize their creative passion, establish an identity, or understand their sexuality.” —Booklist, YA Interest

MOTHER COUNTRY by Irina Reyn
Award-winning author Irina Reyn explores what it means to be a mother in a world where you can’t be with your child. MOTHER COUNTRY is Irina Reyn’s most emotionally complex, urgent novel yet. Hopeful and full of humor, it is a story of mothers and daughters and, above all else, resilience.

“YAs will sympathize with teen Larisska’s simmering resentment about her perceived abandonment, and appreciate her struggles with a challenging disease.” —Booklist, YA Interest

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Nonfiction Round-Up (2/27/19)

A call for togetherness and a thoughtful fashion celebrity memoir–welcome to today’s nonfiction round-up!

DON’T LABEL ME: An Incredible Conversation for Divided Times by Irshad Manji
“Manji’s plea for unity is laudable and well-articulated. Those seeking a level-headed approach to reaching common ground will find Manji and Lily’s conversation instructive.”–Publishers Weekly

I.M.: A Memoir by Isaac Mizrahi
“Honest, insightful, and thoroughly entertaining… Mizrahi comes off in writing just like his onscreen persona: warm, witty, humble—and ready to dish.”–Booklist, starred review

BLACKkKLANSMAN Wins an Oscar!

The movie BlacKkKlansman, adapted from Ron Stallworth’s BLACK KLANSMAN: Race, Hate, and the Undercover Investigation of a Lifetime, won Best Adapted Screenplay at last night’s Oscars ceremony!

Congratulations to this incredible story and the directors, writers, actors, and producers who brought it to life on the big screen.

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