Articles tagged "nineteenth century"

Nonfiction Round-Up (10/09)

A memoir of growing up in and leaving the Westboro Baptist Church, inspiration from Habitat for Humanity’s CEO, a rescue dog that saves other beloved pets, the story of marriage equality from a civil rights activist, the history of rock structures around the world, and the unification of European countries and cities–all in today’s nonfiction round-up.

UNFOLLOW: A Memoir of Loving and Leaving the Westboro Baptist Church by Megan Phelps-Roper

A Publishers Weekly Most Anticipated Book of Fall 2019

“For anyone interested in the power of rhetoric, belief, and family, Phelps-Roper’s powerful, empathetic memoir will be a must-read.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

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Subway Success Story: THE RACE UNDERGROUND

“The blizzard of 1888 was the trigger that cities needed to finally acknowledge that the horse-pulled carriages, the steam-powered elevated trains, the cable-pulled trolleys and even the electrified street railways all suffered from the same flaw that could no longer be ignored. They were at the mercy of the skies.”
– THE RACE UNDERGROUND


Forget Chris Christie's bridge saga–we've got an even better true life story about a rivalry between cities and brothers that resulted in an invention that changed the lives of millions: THE RACE UNDERGROUND by Doug Most.

When the great blizzard of 1888 brought New York City to a halt, citizens realized a new transportation solution had to be found. Enter two brothers–Henry Melville Whitney of Boston and William Collins Whitney of New York City. Each man shared the same dream: that their city would be the first to have a subway system. And with that, the great race was on!

This riveting story is a Junior Library Guild selection, making it a great choice for younger readers interested in transportation history. It's also a great recommendation for adult readers who enjoy Erik Larson and David McCullough.

“Mr. Most weaves together the egos, political hurdles and other daunting challenges…in a sweeping narrative of late-19th-century intrigue.” – Sam Roberts, The New York Times

"An almost flawlessly conducted tour back to a time when major American cities dreamed big." – Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"...A remarkably well-told story filled with villains, heroes, and events of the Gilded Age...." – Library Journal

"[Most] delivers a fun and enjoyable read about a vital, transformative period.” – Publishers Weekly

“This book proves again that American history is a treasure trove of great stories, this one filled with drama, sacrifice, loss and unimaginable success.” — Ken Burns, filmmaker, creator of the PBS series "The Civil War"

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