Articles tagged "New York Times Book Review"

All-in-One “Best Books of 2017”

*drumroll please* For your collection development joy, here are all of our “Best Books of 2017” lists in one place!

Publishers Weekly

Kirkus Reviews Fiction, Nonfiction, Teen

Library Journal — Best Books of 2017 & Notable Books of 2017

School Library Journal‘s Best Adult Books 4 Teens

Booklist Editors’ Choice 2017

New York Times Book Review Top 10 & Editor’s Choice picks

New York Times Notable Books

Washington Post

Los Angeles Times

People Magazine

Time Magazine

GQ Magazine

Vulture (New York Magazine)

Huffington Post

Buzzfeed

NPR’s Book Concierge

Goodreads Choice Awards nominees

Chicago Public Library “Best of the Best of 2017

See all these titles in Macmillan’s Best Books of 2017 Edelweiss collection. #CollectionDevelopmentMadeEasy

NYTBR’s 10 Best Books of 2017 & Editor’s Picks

HOORAY! Two nonfiction titles made the New York Times Book Review‘s “10 Best Books of 2017” list and five more (plus two honorable mentions) are New York Times Critics’ Top Books of 2017!

LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.
A former public defender in Washington, Forman has written a masterly account of how a generation of black officials, beginning in the 1970s, wrestled with recurring crises of violence and drug use in the nation’s capital. What started out as an effort to assert the value of black lives turned into an embrace of tough-on-crime policies — with devastating consequences for the very communities those officials had promised to represent. Forman argues that dismantling the American system of mass incarceration will require a new understanding of justice, one that emphasizes accountability instead of vengeance.

PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
Fraser’s biography of the author of “Little House on the Prairie” and other beloved books about her childhood during the era of westward migration captures the details of a life — and an improbable, iconic literary career — that has been expertly veiled by fiction. Exhaustively researched and passionately written, this book refreshes and revitalizes our understanding of Western American history, giving space to the stories of Native Americans displaced from the tribal lands by white settlers like the Ingalls family as well as to the travails of homesteaders, farmers and everyone else who rushed to the West to extract its often elusive riches. Ending with a savvy analysis of the 20th-century turn toward right-wing politics taken by Wilder and her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, Fraser offers a remarkably wide-angle view of how national myths are shaped.

Dwight Garner

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Buzzfeed’s “Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer”

Buzzfeed chose eight excellent books from Macmillan as part of their “Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer” feature:

THE ANSWERS by Catherine Lacey
Catherine Lacey’s novel THE ANSWERS centers around people looking for the answers to love, to emotions, to ailing bodies. Mary, a young woman in New York City, is desperate for a cure for her paralyzing pain when she finally finds an effective treatment that she can’t afford. To pay for it, she joins eccentric actor Kurt Sky’s “Girlfriend Experiment” — a project for which Sky has recruited multiple women to fulfill different roles in an attempt to create the perfect romantic relationship — and becomes his “Emotional Girlfriend,” along the way learning more about herself and the nature of connection.

GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
Heartbroken after her engagement is called off and feeling that her life has become a mess, 30-year-old Ruth quits her job and goes home to her parents to take care of her father, who is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. As his condition grows worse, Ruth devotes herself to researching supplements and meals that might restore his memory. Tender yet funny in turns, GOODBYE, VITAMIN offers poignant insight into family, memory, marriage, parenthood, love, and loss.

THE CITY ALWAYS WINS by Omar Robert Hamilton
Omar Robert Hamilton’s THE CITY ALWAYS WINS is a vivid, powerful portrait of Egypt’s failed revolution in 2011. Through the eyes of Mariam and Khalil, two young people fighting at the front lines of the revolution in the streets of Cairo and its political underground, THE CITY ALWAYS WINS is an urgent and relevant work that captures the realities of class friction, war, torture, and dictatorships.

MY LIFE WITH BOB by Pamela Paul
MY LIFE WITH BOB is the ultimate book about reading books — New York Times Book Review editor Pamela Paul has kept a journal (named Bob) for 28 years, meticulously tracking every book she’s ever read. The result is an intimate look into her interior life and the ways in which the stories she has read have changed her own story. Clever and heartfelt, MY LIFE WITH BOB will appeal to anyone with a deep love for reading.
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FSG Dominates NYTBR Covers!

2017 FSG NYTBRWe can’t help but notice a trend—Farrar, Straus & Giroux titles have been dominating the cover of the New York Times Book Review for the past month!

SIX FOUR by Hideo Yokohama (February 26 issue)
“Superb… This novel is a real, out-of-the-blue original. I’ve never read anything like it. Yokoyama has written five previous novels and several collections of short fiction, and this is his first book to be translated into English… On the evidence of SIX FOUR, he’s a master.” — Terrence Rafferty

THE DARK FLOOD RISES by Margaret Drabble (February 19 issue)
“This humane and masterly novel by one of Britain’s most dazzling writers is…deeper than mere philosophy: a praisesong for the magical human predicament exactly as it has been ordained on Earth.” — Cynthia Ozick readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Memoirs

Happy Friday! We’re reading two excellent memoirs this weekend:

IN THE DARKROOM by Susan Faludi
Pulitzer-winning journalist and feminist author Faludi’s “wrought and multi-layered memoir”* reveals that her estranged father came out to her as transgender at age 76. Both O Magazine and People Magazine chose it for their Best Books of Summer 2016 lists and it’s receiving rave reviews:

IN THE DARKROOM is an absolute stunner of a memoir—probing, steel-nerved, moving in ways you’d never expect. Ms. Faludi is determined both to demystify the father of her youth… and to re-examine the very notion and nature of identity.”
New York Times Book Review

“It’s a gripping and honest personal journey—bolstered by reams of research—that ultimately transcends family and addresses much bigger questions of identity and reinvention. A–”Entertainment Weekly

“This is a powerful and absorbing memoir of a parent/child relationship.”
— *Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A moving and penetrating inquiry into manifold struggles for identity, community, and authenticity.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“An incomparable memoir that is sure to provoke discussion. Highly recommended for all readers.” — Library Journal, starred review

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2016 Summer Reading Roundup

Major media declared these 27 Macmillan books Summer 2016 must-reads:
Fiction

TRULY MADLY GUILTY by Liane Moriarty (Entertainment Weekly, St. Louis Post Dispatch)
THE CHILDREN by Ann Leary (People Magazine)
THE SPORT OF KINGS by C.E. Morgan (O Magazine)
THE GOOD LIEUTENANT by Whitney Terrell (Buzzfeed)
GRIEF IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS by Max Porter (Wall Street Journal)
REDEMPTION ROAD by John Hart (St. Louis Post Dispatch)
SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS by Helen Phillips (O Magazine)
A WIFE OF NOBLE CHARACTER by Yvonne Georgina Puig (St. Louis Post Dispatch)

Thrillers & Horror

THE 14TH COLONY by Steve Berry (New York Times Book Review)
THE BALLAD OF BLACK TOM by Victor LaValle (New York Times Book Review)

Nonfiction & Memoir

IN THE DARKROOM by Susan Faludi (O Magazine, People Magazine)
THE AUCTIONEER: Adventures in the Art Trade by Simon de Pury (“Good Morning America”)
THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS: Artists and the Last Age of the Exotic by Jamie James (St. Louis Post Dispatch)
LAST NIGHT, A SUPERHERO SAVED MY LIFE: Neil Gaiman!! Jodi Picoult!! Brad Meltzer!!…and an All-Star Roster on the Caped Crusaders That Changed Their Lives by Liesa Mignogna (“Good Morning America”)
NEVER A DULL MOMENT: 1971-The Year That Rock Exploded by David Hepworth (O Magazine)
THIS IS NOT MY BEAUTIFUL LIFE by Victoria Fedden (O Magazine)

Travel & Nature

BEING A BEAST: Adventures Across the Species Divide by Charles Foster (New York Times, Wall Street Journal)
Read the New York Times interview with Charles Foster on his research for BEING A BEAST!
THE HOUR OF LAND: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams (O Magazine)
FOLLOWING FISH: One Man’s Journey into the Food and Culture of the Indian Coast by Samanth Subramanian (New York Times Book Review)
HOW TO TALK ABOUT PLACES YOU’VE NEVER BEEN: On the Importance of Armchair Travel by Pierre Bayard (New York Times Book Review)
PUTIN COUNTRY by Anne Garrels (New York Times Book Review)
UNDER THE STARS: How America Fell in Love with Camping by Dan White (O Magazine)
WORLDS ELSEWHERE: Journeys Around Shakespeare’s Globe by Andrew Dickson (New York Times Book Review)

Sports

THE ONLY RULE IS IT HAS TO WORK: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team by Ben Lindbergh & Sam Miller (New York Times Book Review)

Comics

HOT DOG TASTE TEST by Lisa Hanawalt (Wall Street Journal)
MARY WEPT OVER THE FEET OF JESUS: Prostitution and Religious Obedience in the Bible by Chester Brown (New York Times Book Review)

YA

THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN by Roshani Chokshi (New York Times Book Review)

June is Audiobook Month

Hear hear, June is Audiobook Month! And what better way to kick it off than by celebrating Macmillan Audio’s recent Audie Award winners!

Fiction
THE NIGHTINGALE by Kristin Hannah, read by Polly Stone

Thriller/Suspense
THE PATRIOT THREAT by Steve Berry, read by Scott Brick

Humor
FURIOUSLY HAPPY by Jenny Lawson, read by the author

Even the New York Times Book Review is in on the audiobook love! Check out their recent review for Bill Nye’s UNSTOPPABLE: “Nye is a performer. His audiobook is easy to listen to, especially if you grew up with the children’s television program ‘Bill Nye the Science Guy,’ in which case his voice will be downright familiar.”

Booklist named Scott Brick their 2016 “Voice of Choice and Library Journal ran an audio spotlight which quoted Macmillan Audio’s Executive Director of Production, Laura Wilson.

Planning a road trip this summer? Then check out Macmillan Audio’s interactive United States of Audiobooks map to choose what to listen to from coast to coast.

Share your love of audiobooks on social media using the hashtag #loveaudiobooks all month long and don’t forget to check out Unabridged Access for the latest listening goodies.

Holt Rocks the NYTBR

The New York Times Book Review featured THE BEAUTIFUL BUREAUCRAT by Helen Phillips & ALL THAT FOLLOWED by Gabriel Urza—two Henry Holt & Co. debut novels that we’ve been talking up for months now and are finally on shelves!

Longlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, THE BEAUTIFUL BUREAUCRAT follows Josephine, who spends her days punching numbers into a mysterious database, but soon feels unnerved by her creepy surroundings, sensing that her new employer poses a threat both to herself and to society at large.

“Are we pawns in the thrall of bureaucratic (Kafka) or totalitarian (Orwell) systems? Or are we, in fact, the ones with ultimate power; the arbiters — even unknowingly — of life and death? Helen Phillips deftly interrogates this existential divide in her riveting, drolly surreal debut novel, THE BEAUTIFUL BUREAUCRAT.

“Ultimately, THE BEAUTIFUL BUREAUCRAT succeeds because it isn’t afraid to ask the deepest questions. What is the balance of power and powerlessness between two people who love each other? Do individual souls matter? Can we create, should we destroy, and can we always tell the difference?” — New York Times Book Review

Read the full review here.

ALL THAT FOLLOWED is a Publishers Weekly Best of Summer 2015 selection, a Summer/Fall 2015 Indies Introduce pick, and an August 2015 Indie Next pick!

“Stories are shape-shifters in ALL THAT FOLLOWED Gabriel Urza’s strange and ambitious debut novel. Set in Spain’s Basque Country, the book revolves around the assassination of Councilman José Antonio Torres, as recounted by three characters: Mariana, his dubiously grieving widow; the American teacher Joni Garrett, who came to Muriga in 1951 and wound up staying for his entire life; and Iker Abarzuza, serving time for murder in an island prison, where he listens to the cries of shorebirds and receives the occasional letter from Mariana.

“ALL THAT FOLLOWED isn’t really about the murder. Its chief interests are memory and perception, and the eerie multi­dimensionality that arises when they are layered, somewhat imperfectly, on top of each other. On this front, ALL THAT FOLLOWED is a triumph — Urza delineates his characters’ perspectives with remarkable care. Each shows us a different angle of the fictional world, and illuminates a new aspect of Muriga’s past. As we approach the tragedy we knew was coming all along, the surprise turns out to be the surprises that are jumping out behind us — smaller than we expected, maybe, but sadder and stranger, too.” — New York Times Book Review

Read the full review here.

Thriller Thursday (4/23/15 Edition)

Whether you’re looking to read true crime, a psychological thriller, or settle in with your favorite old (or new) detective, we’ve got the perfect #ThrillerThursday mystery for you:

ONE OF US by Åsne Seierstad
The nonfiction horror story told in ONE OF US moves slowly, inexorably and with tremendous authority. It’s said that exact detail is uniquely helpful when it comes to mending after terrible events. If it is true, as Stephen Jay Gould contended, that ‘nothing matches the holiness and fascination of accurate and intricate detail,’ then Ms. Seierstad has delivered a holy volume indeed.” — The New York Times

REYKJAVIK NIGHTS by Arnaldur Indridason
In this “riveting” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) prequel set in late-1960s Reykjavík, Indridason plumbs the backstory of his series lead, somber Insp. Erlendur Sveinsson. “The Icelandic author’s latest novel, REYKJAVIK NIGHTS nicely illustrates the qualities that make his books so deeply pleasurable.” — New York Times Book Review

A JUNE OF ORDINARY MURDERS by Conor Brady
This debut Victorian-era mystery finds Dublin detective sergeant Joe Swallow on the trail of a series of crimes that paints a much bigger picture. “Fans of mysteries that capture the flavor of the past will hope that Swallow has a long literary life.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE MASQUE OF A MURDERER by Susanna Calkins
“Third in the Lucy Campion historical-mystery series, this absorbing puzzler touches on the religious, social, and political changes in Restoration London as experienced by a wide cast of characters. Calkins’ tantalizing clues and rich historical details depicting everyday life and class differences draw readers into the seventeenth century, led by the piquant and elusive Lucy, whose heart is split between two suitors, her job precarious, and whose dauntless curiosity never flags.” — Booklist readmoreremove

Trending Title: CHASING THE SCREAM

“This is your brain.” Holds up egg.
“This is your brain on drugs.” Cracks egg into hot frying pan where it sizzles.
“Any questions?”

Remember that commercial? If you’re a person of a certain age, you do. But, has anything changed since then?

Enter award-winning journalist Johann Hari and his first book, CHASING THE SCREAM—a multistrand examination of the war on drugs, spanning 100 years from inception to the present day.

Blending sociology, history and reportage with novelistic detail, Hari uses the narratives of the first American drug czar Harry Anslinger, jazz singer and addict Billie Holiday, and drug-dealing gangster Arnold Rothstein as archetypes to point out how the drug war continually perpetuates itself with shocking intensity and contradiction. Dividing his book neatly into five parts, each with its own subsections, Hari concisely lays out the history and long-term effects of the war on drugs with both depth and precision, and ends by examining alternate ways drug use and drug addiction are being dealt with, the new and growing science that shows that everything we thought we knew about drugs may be wrong, and how there is hope for a new understanding of drug use in the future.

Although it was published in January, CHASING THE SCREAM is selling well and receiving lots of media attention. Last month it spent two consecutive weeks on the New York Times Hardcover Nonfiction Extended Bestseller List, reaching a high of #17! Hari was interviewed on HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher” and MSNBC’s “The Cycle,” and was covered in Vanity Fair‘s “Hot Type” and the New York Times Book Review:

“Hari’s empathy and keen eye for detail bring a disparate group of characters to life, including a former drug dealer and gang leader from Brooklyn transitioning from living as a woman to living as a man, and a teenager in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, who dresses up as an angel to highlight the savage butchery that has made that border city one of the most dangerous places on earth.” New York Times Book Review

“Hari has made a stimulating hybrid of a book—simultaneously a readable history of the war on drugs and a powerful case for radical reform.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“It is one of the few glimmers of hope, alongside movements to legalize marijuana, in a worldwide war whose fight should not be against drugs but for humanity in general. A compassionate and humane argument to overturn draconian drug policies.”
— Kirkus Reviews

“[Hari] portrays everyone with empathy, from drug dealers to drug addicts, law enforcement personnel, and civilians caught in the middle of this war, which, along with the first-person narration, helps to keep the narrative engaging…” — Booklist

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