Articles tagged "New York Times"

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

NYT Notable Books of 2016

The New York Times announced their Notable Books of 2016, including these 17 Macmillan titles:
Fiction & Poetry

ALL THAT MAN IS by David Szalay
Szalay writes with voluptuous authority about masculinity under duress in this novel in stories.

BLACK WATER by Louise Doughty
Expecting to be assassinated, the hero of this excellent novel grapples with guilt over his actions in Indonesia.

CHILDREN OF THE NEW WORLD by Alexander Weinstein
The terror that technology may rob us of authentic experience—that it may annihilate our very sense of self—is central to this debut collection of short stories.

GRIEF IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS by Max Porter
A father and his sons struggle with a death in this luminous novel.

HERE I AM by Jonathan Safran Foer
Private and public crises converge for four generations of a Jewish family in this ambitious, often brilliant novel, Foer’s third.

HOT MILK by Deborah Levy
In Levy’s evocative novel, dense with symbolism, a woman struggles against her hypochondriacal mother to achieve her own identity. readmoreremove

Agatha Raisin’s on TV!

If you don’t know M.C. Beaton‘s feisty, gloriously non-pc PR maven-turned-amateur sleuth, Agatha Raisin, you should. She solves many a murder (and falls desperately for many a man) in the cozy Cotswold village of Carsely, which isn’t quite as peaceful as it seems.

Readers familiar with Agatha’s adventures can now watch them on the small screen in the Acorn TV series “Agatha Raisin.”

The first episode, “Agatha Raisin and the Quiche of Death,” airs today (watch it right here!) and every following Monday on Acorn through the end of September (Acorn is available through Apple TV, Roku, and Samsung). “Agatha Raisin” will start airing on select PBS stations in 2017.

The New York Times even did a write-up about actress Ashley Jensen and praised the show: “…armed with a P.R. storyboard and some chutzpah, a wine-swilling, man-lusting, thoroughly modern Miss Marple is born in this adaptation of M. C. Beaton’s merry mysteries.”

Viewers turning to the books can start with the TV tie-in edition of INTRODUCING AGATHA RAISIN, an omnibus of the first two titles in the series, THE QUICHE OF DEATH and THE VICIOUS VET. Readers will have plenty to enjoy after that—the 27th book in the series, PUSHING UP DAISIES, is available September 20, 2016.

 

2016 Summer Reading Roundup

Major media declared these 27 Macmillan books Summer 2016 must-reads:
Fiction

TRULY MADLY GUILTY by Liane Moriarty (Entertainment Weekly, St. Louis Post Dispatch)
THE CHILDREN by Ann Leary (People Magazine)
THE SPORT OF KINGS by C.E. Morgan (O Magazine)
THE GOOD LIEUTENANT by Whitney Terrell (Buzzfeed)
GRIEF IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS by Max Porter (Wall Street Journal)
REDEMPTION ROAD by John Hart (St. Louis Post Dispatch)
SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS by Helen Phillips (O Magazine)
A WIFE OF NOBLE CHARACTER by Yvonne Georgina Puig (St. Louis Post Dispatch)

Thrillers & Horror

THE 14TH COLONY by Steve Berry (New York Times Book Review)
THE BALLAD OF BLACK TOM by Victor LaValle (New York Times Book Review)

Nonfiction & Memoir

IN THE DARKROOM by Susan Faludi (O Magazine, People Magazine)
THE AUCTIONEER: Adventures in the Art Trade by Simon de Pury (“Good Morning America”)
THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS: Artists and the Last Age of the Exotic by Jamie James (St. Louis Post Dispatch)
LAST NIGHT, A SUPERHERO SAVED MY LIFE: Neil Gaiman!! Jodi Picoult!! Brad Meltzer!!…and an All-Star Roster on the Caped Crusaders That Changed Their Lives by Liesa Mignogna (“Good Morning America”)
NEVER A DULL MOMENT: 1971-The Year That Rock Exploded by David Hepworth (O Magazine)
THIS IS NOT MY BEAUTIFUL LIFE by Victoria Fedden (O Magazine)

Travel & Nature

BEING A BEAST: Adventures Across the Species Divide by Charles Foster (New York Times, Wall Street Journal)
Read the New York Times interview with Charles Foster on his research for BEING A BEAST!
THE HOUR OF LAND: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams (O Magazine)
FOLLOWING FISH: One Man’s Journey into the Food and Culture of the Indian Coast by Samanth Subramanian (New York Times Book Review)
HOW TO TALK ABOUT PLACES YOU’VE NEVER BEEN: On the Importance of Armchair Travel by Pierre Bayard (New York Times Book Review)
PUTIN COUNTRY by Anne Garrels (New York Times Book Review)
UNDER THE STARS: How America Fell in Love with Camping by Dan White (O Magazine)
WORLDS ELSEWHERE: Journeys Around Shakespeare’s Globe by Andrew Dickson (New York Times Book Review)

Sports

THE ONLY RULE IS IT HAS TO WORK: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team by Ben Lindbergh & Sam Miller (New York Times Book Review)

Comics

HOT DOG TASTE TEST by Lisa Hanawalt (Wall Street Journal)
MARY WEPT OVER THE FEET OF JESUS: Prostitution and Religious Obedience in the Bible by Chester Brown (New York Times Book Review)

YA

THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN by Roshani Chokshi (New York Times Book Review)

Thriller Thursday (4/23/15 Edition)

Whether you’re looking to read true crime, a psychological thriller, or settle in with your favorite old (or new) detective, we’ve got the perfect #ThrillerThursday mystery for you:

ONE OF US by Åsne Seierstad
The nonfiction horror story told in ONE OF US moves slowly, inexorably and with tremendous authority. It’s said that exact detail is uniquely helpful when it comes to mending after terrible events. If it is true, as Stephen Jay Gould contended, that ‘nothing matches the holiness and fascination of accurate and intricate detail,’ then Ms. Seierstad has delivered a holy volume indeed.” — The New York Times

REYKJAVIK NIGHTS by Arnaldur Indridason
In this “riveting” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) prequel set in late-1960s Reykjavík, Indridason plumbs the backstory of his series lead, somber Insp. Erlendur Sveinsson. “The Icelandic author’s latest novel, REYKJAVIK NIGHTS nicely illustrates the qualities that make his books so deeply pleasurable.” — New York Times Book Review

A JUNE OF ORDINARY MURDERS by Conor Brady
This debut Victorian-era mystery finds Dublin detective sergeant Joe Swallow on the trail of a series of crimes that paints a much bigger picture. “Fans of mysteries that capture the flavor of the past will hope that Swallow has a long literary life.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE MASQUE OF A MURDERER by Susanna Calkins
“Third in the Lucy Campion historical-mystery series, this absorbing puzzler touches on the religious, social, and political changes in Restoration London as experienced by a wide cast of characters. Calkins’ tantalizing clues and rich historical details depicting everyday life and class differences draw readers into the seventeenth century, led by the piquant and elusive Lucy, whose heart is split between two suitors, her job precarious, and whose dauntless curiosity never flags.” — Booklist readmoreremove

#ThrillerThursday: The Softer Side (11/13/14 Edition)

Victorian England’s amateur sleuth Charles Lenox has been compared to Sherlock Holmes and Dorothy L. Sayers’s Lord Peter Wimsey — his creator, Charles Finch, has been compared to Agatha Christie and Anne Perry. My dear librarian, why haven’t you dipped into this delightful series, yet?

A BEAUTIFUL BLUE DEATH

“Vividly capturing the essence of Victorian England, Finch presents us with a unique sleuth who combines the deductive powers of Sherlock Holmes with the people skills of Thomas Pitt. A sparkling achievement.”–Library Journal (starred review)

THE SEPTEMBER SOCIETY

“Even the most astute reader will be guessing to the end. Another triumph.” —Library Journal (starred review)

THE FLEET STREET MURDERS

“A beguiling Victorian mystery [with] an amiable gentleman sleuth cut from the same fine English broadcloth as Dorothy L. Sayers’s Lord Peter Wimsey.”–Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review

A STRANGER IN MAYFAIR

“Readers of Anne Perry should be snatching up Finch’s books and clamoring for more.”–Library Journal (starred review)

A BURIAL AT SEA

“Agatha Christie meets Patrick O’Brian in Finch’s accomplished fifth whodunit set in Victorian England … the best in the series to date.”–Publishers Weekly (starred Review)

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Sneak a peek at Hilary Mantel’s new book!

Any time Man Booker Prize winner Hilary Mantel has a new book, we can’t wait to get our grubby little paws on it. Her latest, THE ASSASSINATION OF MARGARET THATCHER, is a brilliant collection of contemporary short stories.

The New York Times ran the title story in this past weekend’s Book Review—you can read it right now!

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Hot Title Alert: 10:04

NPR, The New York Times, and Entertainment Weekly are but a few of the many fans of Ben Lerner’s 10:04. Dear librarian, won’t you join us on the 10:04 bandwagon*?

**e-mail Library@macmillanusa.com (subject: 10:04) for your complimentary copy today.

“A mind-blowing book…” — Maureen Corrigan, NPR’s Fresh Air

Mr. Lerner is among the most interesting young American novelists at present for several reasons, one being that he’s akin to a young Brooklynite version of the Norwegian novelist Karl Ove Knausgaard. That is, in his books, little happens, yet everything happens. We come to relish seeing the world through this man’s eyes.” — Dwight Garner, the New York Times

Ingenious… Lerner packs so much brilliance and humor into each episode… This brain-tickling book imbues real experiences with a feeling of artistic possibility, leaving the observable world ‘a little changed, a little charged.’” — Sam Sacks, The Wall Street Journal

“A funny, deeply observational metaphysical romp.”Entertainment Weekly, Grade: A

“A generous, provocative, ambitious Chinese box of a novel, 10:04 is a near-perfect piece of literature, affirmative of both life and art, written with the full force of Lerner’s intellectual, aesthetic, and empathetic powers, which are as considerable as they are vitalizing.” — Los Angeles Review of Books

This masterful, at times dizzying novel reevaluates not just what fiction can do but what it is. Cuttingly hilarious and incisive, Lerner’s novel would be a success without the layers of fiction (on reality on fiction). But with that narrative device, the book achieves brilliance, at once a study of how fiction functions and an expansive catalogue of life.” — Time Out New York, 5 out of 5 stars

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Thriller Thursday (3/20/14 Edition)

Happy #ThrillerThursday, friends! Here's a look at the latest books keeping us up past bedtime:

THE CAIRO AFFAIR by Olen Steinhauer
Steinhauer's geopolitical tale about a murdered diplomat, his unfaithful wife, her Egyptian intelligence ex-lover, and a CIA analyst recently earned a rave New York Times review from Janet Maslin: “Elaborate, sophisticated…a long, twisty road full of cleverly placed potholes and unexpected turns. Mr. Steinhauer draws his spies as flesh-and-blood characters in whom his readers invest both attention and emotion.”

DECODED by Mai Jia
“Told by a shadowy narrator who draws on interview transcripts and declassified documents, the book ranges in style from mythic fairy tale to spy story to epistemological speculation. Within this fantastic framework unfolds the saga of Rong Jinzhen, a youngster of illegitimate origin and odd upbringing whose phenomenal success in his non-chosen field leads to international counterespionage.” — The Wall Street Journal 
BONUS: read the interview with Mai Jia in the New York Times Sinosphere blog

DON'T LOOK FOR ME by Loren D. Estleman
In the 24th(!) book in the Amos Walker series, the "barely housebroken" P.I. finds himself caught between the mafia and the porn industry. "A direct descendant of Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe, Walker fires up a cig, has a sip of Scotch, and ponders how the case of a disappeared wife can get this complicated. A very good entry in a solid series." — Booklist  

THE TRIDENT DECEPTION by Rick Campbell
"Campbell utilizes his background as a retired navy commander and his familiarity with submarines to craft a terrific thriller debut. Campbell does an amazing job, balancing character interaction with high-octane action, all the while keeping the technical jargon to a level understandable by nonmilitary readers. This is the best novel about a submarine since Tom Clancy’s classic THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER." — Booklist, starred review

What's tingling your spine this #ThrillerThursday? Share your reads with us @MacmillanLib

#BookBday Bonus: THE SIXTH EXTINCTION

We've got another special Book Birthday this week: THE SIXTH EXTINCTION by Elizabeth Kolbert, which started as a two-part series in the New Yorker.

Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly contracted. Scientists are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. The cause? Humans! (GULP.)

THE SIXTH EXTINCTION has FOUR outstanding starred pre-publication reviews and major media coverage is starting off with a Big Bang:
     * A front page rave New York Times Book Review from former Vice President Al Gore 
     * A New York Times daily review by Michiko Kakutani
     * Appearances on CBS "This Morning" and "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart"
     * Interviews on NPR's "All Things Considered" and "Fresh Air"
     * Reviews to come in Scientific American Magazine, The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and many more

Praise for THE SIXTH EXTINCTION:

“'People change the world,' Kolbert writes, and she vividly presents the science and history of the current crisis. Her extensive travels in researching this book, and her insightful treatment of both the history and the science all combine to make THE SIXTH EXTINCTION an invaluable contribution to our understanding of present circumstances, just as the paradigm shift she calls for is sorely needed.”
New York Times Book Review by Al Gore

“New Yorker staff writer Kolbert accomplishes an amazing feat in her latest book, which superbly blends the depressing facts...with stellar writing to produce a text that is accessible, witty, scientifically accurate, and impossible to put down.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Rendered with rare, resolute, and resounding clarity, Kolbert’s compelling and enlightening report forthrightly addresses the most significant topic of our lives.”
Booklist, starred review

“A highly significant eye-opener rich in facts and enjoyment.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"This solid, engaging, multidisciplinary science title should appeal to a broad range of science enthusiasts, particularly those interested in environmental conservation.”
Library Journal, starred review
(also featured in Neal Wyatt's RA Crossroads review)

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