Articles tagged "New York Times"

Most Anticipated Books of Summer 2018

Drumroll, please…. Here are the most anticipated books of Summer 2018, according to major media:

New York Times — “Refreshing Books to Read This Summer
TEN ARGUMENTS FOR DELETING YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS RIGHT NOW by Jaron Lanier
SOMETHING WONDERFUL: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway Revolution by Todd S. Purdum
THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson

New York Times Book Review — “Summer Reading
OUR KIND OF CRUELTY by Araminta Hall
FRESH INDIA by Meera Sodha
THE TRAUMA CLEANER by Sarah Krasnostein
A LINE IN THE RIVER: Khartoum, City of Memory by Jamal Mahjoub
EPIC CITY: The World on the Streets of Calcutta by Kushanava Choudhury
SIREN SONG by Seymour Stein with Gareth Murphy
RAW: My Journey Into the Wu-Tang by Lamont “U-God” Hawkins
JUST A SHOT AWAY by Saul Austerlitz

USA Today
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
What it’s about: In this sequel to I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT, working mom Kate Reddy returns, almost 50 and juggling difficult teenagers, a husband having a midlife crisis, and an old flame who shows up.
Why it’s hot: Big Little Lies executive producer Bruna Papandrea has optioned Pearson’s new comic novel for TV.

Washington Post — “The Books We’re Talking About This Summer
FIRE AND FURY: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff
THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
THE LIST: A Week-by-Week Reckoning of Trump’s First Year by Amy Siskind
ROBIN by Dave Itzkoff

Good Morning America
BRING ME BACK by B.A. Paris

Parade — “The Top Hottest Books of Summer 2018”
THE SUBWAY GIRLS by Susie Orman Schnall
BEFORE AND AGAIN by Barbara Delinsky
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
INVITATION TO A BONFIRE by Adrienne Celt
SHELTER IN PLACE by Nora Roberts

Newsweek — “The Coolest Books to Read This Summer: 2018’s Best Fiction and Non-Fiction (So Far)
CITY OF DEVILS: The Two Men Who Ruled the Underworld of Old Shanghai by Paul French
THE RACE TO SAVE THE ROMANOVS: The Truth Behind the Secret Plans to Rescue the Russian Imperial Family by Helen Rappaport
WHAT WOULD THE GREAT ECONOMISTS DO?: How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve Today’s Biggest Problems by Linda Yueh
GRIST MILL ROAD by Christopher J. Yates
SIX FOUR by Hideo Yokoyama
A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
CHASING NEW HORIZONS: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto by Alan Stern and David Grinspoon
DARWIN COMES TO TOWN by Menno Schilthuizen

Bloomberg
FACTFULNESS: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World-and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling
ROBIN by Dave Itzkoff

Time Magazine — “New Books to Read This Summer
NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson

Elle — “The Best Books to Read This Summer
MOTHERHOOD by Sheila Heti
LOVE THAT BUNCH by Aline Kominsky-Crumb
INVITATION TO A BONFIRE by Adrienne Celt
KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
TONIGHT I’M SOMEONE ELSE by Chelsea Hodson
THE THIRD HOTEL by Laura van den Berg
THIS MOURNABLE BODY by Tsitsi Dangarembga

Glamour — “The Best Books to Read This Summer
LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE by Sloane Crosley
AMITY AND PROSPERITY: One Family and the Fracturing of America by Eliza Griswold

Vanity Fair
KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
IF YOU SEE ME, DON’T SAY HI by Neel Patel

Esquire
CADDYSHACK: The Making of a Hollywood Cinderella Story by Chris Nashawaty
RAW: My Journey Into the Wu-Tang by Lamont “U-God” Hawkins
THE MERRY SPINSTER: Tales of Everyday Horror by Mallory Ortberg

Buzzfeed — “Summer Books To Get Excited About
SEVERANCE by Ling Ma
KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS by Heid E. Erdrich
EARLY WORK by Andrew Martin
NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
MIRROR, SHOULDER, SIGNAL by Dorthe Nors

PopSugar
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
EVERY TIME YOU GO AWAY by Beth Harbison

Bustle
HOW TO WALK AWAY by Katherine Center
INVITATION TO A BONFIRE by Adrienne Celt
NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
THIS MOURNABLE BODY by Tsitsi Dangarembga

June is Audiobook Month

June is Audiobook Month! And our pals at Macmillan Audio are celebrating with an Instagram challenge: post a picture each day in June using the daily prompt and hashtag and they’ll repost! Share your love of audiobooks, recommendations, and beautiful #bookstagrams with us and your fellow (audio)bookworms. BTW, did you know that Macmillan Library is also now on Instagram?! Don’t forget to tag us, too!

Audiobooks have grown so popular that the New York Times created dedicated Fiction and Nonfiction audio bestseller lists! Here (or should we say, hear, haha) are some of our picks:

Fiction
THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah, read by Julia Whelan
THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen, read by Julia Whelan
(MISTBORN) THE FINAL EMPIRE by Brandon Sanderson, read by Michael Kramer readmoreremove

A HIGHER LOYALTY is FINALLY HERE!!!

James Comey’s A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership is finally out TODAY in hardcover and audio!

The former FBI Director started his tour and major media appearances, including ABC’s Primetime Special with George Stephanopoulos, ABC’s Good Morning America (7am and 8am hours), NPR’s Morning Edition & Fresh Air, and later tonight, CBS’s Late Show with Stephen ColbertUSA Today ran an interview, and reviews are pouring from the New York Times, Associated Press, NPR (“by far the most consequential book yet in the literature of the Trump presidency”), and many more.

Upcoming Media & Appearances for Comey:

April 18:
ABC’s The View, LIVE interview
ABC Radio Network Satellite Tour, 9:30am-11am.

April 19:
CNN’s The Lead with Jake Tapper LIVE, 4pm
MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show LIVE, 9pm

April 25:
CNN Town Hall with Anderson Cooper at William & Mary

April 26:
Fox News’ Special Report with Bret Baier, 6pm

April 29:
NBC’s Meet The Press, taped interview with Chuck Todd

April 30:
PBS’s NewsHour, taped interview with Judy Woodruff

May 4:
CBS This Morning interview, 7am hour

TOUR

April 18, 7pm – NYC
Barnes & Noble Union Square
33 E 17th St
New York, NY 10003

April 19, 7pm – NYC
Live taping of The New Yorker Radio Hour at NYC Town Hall
123 W 43rd St
New York, NY 10036 readmoreremove

Happy Women’s History Month/International Women’s Day 2018!

March is Women’s History Month and today we celebrate International Women’s Day! Get inspired by our 2018 ALA Amelia Bloomer Project Book List titles (best feminist books):

GIRLS MADE OF SNOW AND GLASS by Melissa Bashardoust
DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES by Seanan McGuire
A HOPE MORE POWERFUL THAN THE SEA by Melissa Fleming

For Women’s History Month, The New York Times’s staff book critics chose “15 remarkable books by women that are shaping the way we read and write fiction in the 21st century.” Here are the Macmillan picks:

OUTLINE by Rachel Cusk
AMERICAN INNOVATIONS by Rivka Galchen
HOW SHOULD A PERSON BE? by Sheila Heti
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado
SALVAGE THE BONES by Jesmyn Ward

Some of our faves on shelves now:
NASTY WOMEN: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump’s America, edited by Samhita Mukhopadhyay & Kate Harding
WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors & asha bandele
ONE DAY WE’LL ALL BE DEAD AND NONE OF THIS WILL MATTER by Scaachi Koul
GEEK GIRL RISING: Inside the Sisterhood Shaking Up Tech by Heather Cabot & Samantha Walravens
REAL AMERICAN by Julie Lythcott-Haims

And future faves coming to your shelves soon:
ELOQUENT RAGE: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower by Brittney Cooper
MINORITY LEADER: How to Lead from the Outside and Make Real Change by Stacey Abrams
A POLITICALLY INCORRECT FEMINIST: Creating a Movement with Bitches, Lunatics, Dykes, Prodigies, Warriors, and Wonder Women by Phyllis Chesler readmoreremove

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (psst… it’s Oscar)

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME is nominated for four Academy Awards!

Best Picture
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Actor in a Leading Role (Timothée Chalamet)
Best Original Song (“Mystery of Love,” music and lyrics by Sufjan Stevens)

The Oscar Awards Ceremony will take place on March 4th.

Bestseller Lists Roundup (as of 1/22/18):
New York Times paperback fiction: 2 weeks (best rank #8)
USA Today: 4 weeks (#37)
Los Angeles Times: 6 weeks (#1)
Amazon Top 50: 4 weeks (#17)
iBooks: 3 weeks (#5)
Indie National: 1 week (#14)
Regional Indie: All 9 lists for most recent week
Publishers Weekly frontlist trade paperback: 4 weeks (#6)

See André Aciman on national tour!

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FIRE AND FURY Frenzy!

Media is at a fever pitch for Michael Wolff’s FIRE AND FURY: Inside the Trump White House!

1st Serial Excerpt
New York Magazine (on stands 1/8, online now)

TV
1/5 The Today Show
1/7 Meet the Press
1/8 CBS This Morning
1/8 Morning Joe
1/8 MSNBC, Katy Tur
1/8 NBC Nightly News
1/8 MSNBC, Lawrence O’Donnell
1/8 Late Night with Stephen Colbert
1/8, Fox News, Ingraham Angle
1/9 MSNBC, Hardball with Chris Matthews
1/10 The View
1/10 CNN, Don Lemon Show
1/13 CNN, Michael Smerconish

RADIO
NPR’s “All Things Considered” — (1/5/181/7/18book review)

PRINT
Entertainment Weekly
USA Today
New York Times
Washington Post
San Francisco Chronicle
Los Angeles Times
New Yorker
Economist
Boston Globe

A message from Macmillan CEO John Sargent regarding FIRE AND FURY:

Last Thursday, shortly after 7:00 a.m., we received a demand from the President of the United States to “immediately cease and desist from any further publication, release or dissemination” of Michael Wolff’s FIRE AND FURY. On Thursday afternoon we responded with a short statement saying that we would publish the book, and we moved the pub date forward to the next day. Later today we will send our legal response to President Trump.

Our response is firm, as it has to be. I am writing you today to explain why this is a matter of great importance. It is about much more than FIRE AND FURY.

The president is free to call news “fake” and to blast the media. That goes against convention, but it is not unconstitutional. But a demand to cease and desist publication—a clear effort by the President of the United States to intimidate a publisher into halting publication of an important book on the workings of the government—is an attempt to achieve what is called prior restraint. That is something that no American court would order as it is flagrantly unconstitutional.

This is very clearly defined in Supreme Court case law, most prominently in the Pentagon Papers case. As Justice Hugo Black explained in his concurrence:

“Both the history and language of the First Amendment support the view that the press must be left free to publish news, whatever the source, without censorship, injunctions, or prior restraints. In the First Amendment, the Founding Fathers gave the free press the protection it must have to fulfill its essential role in our democracy. The press was to serve the governed, not the governors. The Government’s power to censor the press was abolished so that the press would remain forever free to censure the Government.”

Then there is Justice William Brennan’s opinion in The New York Times Co. v. Sullivan:

“Thus we consider this case against the background of a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.” readmoreremove

All-in-One “Best Books of 2017”

*drumroll please* For your collection development joy, here are all of our “Best Books of 2017” lists in one place!

Publishers Weekly

Kirkus Reviews Fiction, Nonfiction, Teen

Library Journal — Best Books of 2017 & Notable Books of 2017

School Library Journal‘s Best Adult Books 4 Teens

Booklist Editors’ Choice 2017

New York Times Book Review Top 10 & Editor’s Choice picks

New York Times Notable Books

Washington Post

Los Angeles Times

People Magazine

Time Magazine

GQ Magazine

Vulture (New York Magazine)

Huffington Post

Buzzfeed

NPR’s Book Concierge

Goodreads Choice Awards nominees

Chicago Public Library “Best of the Best of 2017

See all these titles in Macmillan’s Best Books of 2017 Edelweiss collection. #CollectionDevelopmentMadeEasy

New York Times Notable Books of 2017

The gray lady picked 14 Macmillan titles:

Fiction & Poetry
THE DARK FLOOD RISES by Margaret Drabble
4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster
FRESH COMPLAINT by Jeffrey Eugenides
THE NINTH HOUR by Alice McDermott
SIX FOUR by Hideo Yokoyama
TRANSIT by Rachel Cusk
WHEREAS by Layli Long Soldier

Nonfiction
AGE OF ANGER: A History of the Present by Pankaj Mishra
BUNK: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News by Kevin Young
FLANEUSE: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice, and London by Lauren Elkin
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr. (a NYTBR Top Ten pick!)
NOTES ON A FOREIGN COUNTRY: An American Abroad in a Post-American World by Suzy Hansen
PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser (a NYTBR Top Ten pick!)
YOU SAY TO BRICK: The Life of Louis Kahn by Wendy Lesser

See these and many more titles in Macmillan’s Best Books of 2017 Edelweiss collection. We’ll update it as more “Best of 2017” lists come in. #CollectionDevelopmentMadeEasy

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

NYT Notable Books of 2016

The New York Times announced their Notable Books of 2016, including these 17 Macmillan titles:
Fiction & Poetry

ALL THAT MAN IS by David Szalay
Szalay writes with voluptuous authority about masculinity under duress in this novel in stories.

BLACK WATER by Louise Doughty
Expecting to be assassinated, the hero of this excellent novel grapples with guilt over his actions in Indonesia.

CHILDREN OF THE NEW WORLD by Alexander Weinstein
The terror that technology may rob us of authentic experience—that it may annihilate our very sense of self—is central to this debut collection of short stories.

GRIEF IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS by Max Porter
A father and his sons struggle with a death in this luminous novel.

HERE I AM by Jonathan Safran Foer
Private and public crises converge for four generations of a Jewish family in this ambitious, often brilliant novel, Foer’s third.

HOT MILK by Deborah Levy
In Levy’s evocative novel, dense with symbolism, a woman struggles against her hypochondriacal mother to achieve her own identity. readmoreremove

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