Articles tagged "NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS"

July 2018 All-Stars

Whether it’s literary fiction, mystery, poetry, or graphic novels, these books all have the same thing in common: multiple starred reviews!

THE GOLDEN STATE by Lydia Kiesling
“Kiesling’s intimate, culturally perceptive debut portrays a frazzled mother and a fractious America, both verging on meltdown. But perhaps best of all is her thought-provoking portrait of a pioneer community in decline as anger and obsession fray bonds between neighbors, family, and fellow citizens.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“There’s so much to love about this novel… Strongly recommended for readers who enjoy contemporary literary fiction and can handle a few swear words.” Library Journal, starred review

BONE ON BONE by Julia Keller
“Keller can spin a mystery plot with the best of them, but it’s her full-bodied characters and the regard they have for one another that really sets her crime fiction apart: a bride’s back-of-the-hand caress of her new husband’s cheek, and his response, is a moment that will linger in memory long after the crime is solved.” Booklist, starred review

“Beautifully written… This thoughtful, painfully empathetic story will long linger in the reader’s memory.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

CITY OF INK by Elsa Hart
“Rich in period detail, a sharply rendered exotic setting, and a web of well-crafted plots, Li Du’s third novel will appeal to fans of historical mysteries by Lisa See, Laura Joh Rowland, and Abir Mukherjee.” Booklist, starred review

“Superb… As always, Hart excels at making even walk-on characters fully realized and at combining a gripping whodunit plot with a vivid evocation of the period. This entry solidifies her status as a top-notch historical mystery author. ” — Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

Most Anticipated Books of Summer 2018

Drumroll, please…. Here are the most anticipated books of Summer 2018, according to major media:

New York Times — “Refreshing Books to Read This Summer
TEN ARGUMENTS FOR DELETING YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS RIGHT NOW by Jaron Lanier
SOMETHING WONDERFUL: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway Revolution by Todd S. Purdum
THE PARKING LOT ATTENDANT by Nafkote Tamirat
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson

New York Times Book Review — “Summer Reading
OUR KIND OF CRUELTY by Araminta Hall
FRESH INDIA by Meera Sodha
THE TRAUMA CLEANER by Sarah Krasnostein
A LINE IN THE RIVER: Khartoum, City of Memory by Jamal Mahjoub
EPIC CITY: The World on the Streets of Calcutta by Kushanava Choudhury
SIREN SONG by Seymour Stein with Gareth Murphy
RAW: My Journey Into the Wu-Tang by Lamont “U-God” Hawkins
JUST A SHOT AWAY by Saul Austerlitz

USA Today
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
What it’s about: In this sequel to I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT, working mom Kate Reddy returns, almost 50 and juggling difficult teenagers, a husband having a midlife crisis, and an old flame who shows up.
Why it’s hot: Big Little Lies executive producer Bruna Papandrea has optioned Pearson’s new comic novel for TV.

Washington Post — “The Books We’re Talking About This Summer
FIRE AND FURY: Inside the Trump White House by Michael Wolff
THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
THE LIST: A Week-by-Week Reckoning of Trump’s First Year by Amy Siskind
ROBIN by Dave Itzkoff

Good Morning America
BRING ME BACK by B.A. Paris

Parade — “The Top Hottest Books of Summer 2018”
THE SUBWAY GIRLS by Susie Orman Schnall
BEFORE AND AGAIN by Barbara Delinsky
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
INVITATION TO A BONFIRE by Adrienne Celt
SHELTER IN PLACE by Nora Roberts

Newsweek — “The Coolest Books to Read This Summer: 2018’s Best Fiction and Non-Fiction (So Far)
CITY OF DEVILS: The Two Men Who Ruled the Underworld of Old Shanghai by Paul French
THE RACE TO SAVE THE ROMANOVS: The Truth Behind the Secret Plans to Rescue the Russian Imperial Family by Helen Rappaport
WHAT WOULD THE GREAT ECONOMISTS DO?: How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve Today’s Biggest Problems by Linda Yueh
GRIST MILL ROAD by Christopher J. Yates
SIX FOUR by Hideo Yokoyama
A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey
CHASING NEW HORIZONS: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto by Alan Stern and David Grinspoon
DARWIN COMES TO TOWN by Menno Schilthuizen

Bloomberg
FACTFULNESS: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World-and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling
ROBIN by Dave Itzkoff

Time Magazine — “New Books to Read This Summer
NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
WHAT TRUTH SOUNDS LIKE: Robert F. Kennedy, James Baldwin, and Our Unfinished Conversation About Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson

Elle — “The Best Books to Read This Summer
MOTHERHOOD by Sheila Heti
LOVE THAT BUNCH by Aline Kominsky-Crumb
INVITATION TO A BONFIRE by Adrienne Celt
KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
TONIGHT I’M SOMEONE ELSE by Chelsea Hodson
THE THIRD HOTEL by Laura van den Berg
THIS MOURNABLE BODY by Tsitsi Dangarembga

Glamour — “The Best Books to Read This Summer
LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE by Sloane Crosley
AMITY AND PROSPERITY: One Family and the Fracturing of America by Eliza Griswold

Vanity Fair
KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
IF YOU SEE ME, DON’T SAY HI by Neel Patel

Esquire
CADDYSHACK: The Making of a Hollywood Cinderella Story by Chris Nashawaty
RAW: My Journey Into the Wu-Tang by Lamont “U-God” Hawkins
THE MERRY SPINSTER: Tales of Everyday Horror by Mallory Ortberg

Buzzfeed — “Summer Books To Get Excited About
SEVERANCE by Ling Ma
KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS by Heid E. Erdrich
EARLY WORK by Andrew Martin
NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
MIRROR, SHOULDER, SIGNAL by Dorthe Nors

PopSugar
HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
EVERY TIME YOU GO AWAY by Beth Harbison

Bustle
HOW TO WALK AWAY by Katherine Center
INVITATION TO A BONFIRE by Adrienne Celt
NUMBER ONE CHINESE RESTAURANT by Lillian Li
THIS MOURNABLE BODY by Tsitsi Dangarembga

PW Best Summer Books of 2018

Publishers Weekly recently announced their Best Summer Books of 2018, including these 9 Macmillan titles:
Top 10 (full list)

NEW POETS OF NATIVE NATIONS, edited by Heid E. Erdrich
Rather than anthologize contemporary and emerging authors alongside classic or familiar ones, Erdrich introduces readers to 21 Native poets whose writing was first published after 2000. It’s a simple, powerful framing and all that is needed to introduce readers to a group of writers whose breadth and diversity of styles represent some of the best of contemporary poetry today. —Alex Green, New England correspondent

Fiction (full list)

BABY TEETH by Zoje Stage
Stage’s debut novel is a deviously fun domestic horror story that takes child-rearing anxiety to demented new heights. Frustrated stay-at-home mom Suzette attempts to pacify her seven-year-old daughter Hanna, who adores her father but distrusts Suzette, has dangerous tantrums, and only speaks in the voice of a 17th-century girl who was burned at the stake. As Suzette tries to connect with Hanna, Hanna plots ways to “step up her game against Mommy.”

BROTHER by David Chariandy
Set during the summer of 1991 in the Park, a housing complex in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, Chariandy’s powerful and incendiary novel tracks the coming of age of two mixed-heritage brothers. Sensitive Michael fumbles through his first relationship while volatile Francis becomes obsessed with the burgeoning hip-hop scene. Chariandy imbues his resilient characters with strength and hope.

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
Cusk’s final book in a trilogy (after OUTLINE and TRANSIT) expertly concludes the story of protagonist British author Faye. Like its predecessors, the novel eschews chronicling Faye’s life via traditional narrative, instead filling each page with conversations with and monologues by the many writers, journalists, and publicists she meets during her travels. As always, Cusk’s ear for dialogue and language is stunning. The author ends Faye’s trilogy with yet another gem.

Mystery (full list)

CAGED by Ellison Cooper
In her debut thriller, Cooper, an anthropologist who has worked as a murder investigator in Washington, D.C., channels “equal parts Kathy Reichs and Thomas Harris” (according to Lisa Gardner). In the basement of a D.C. house, a woman is found dead in a cage—left to slowly starve to death in a cold and calculating experiment with no clear motive. readmoreremove

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