Articles tagged "nature"

Friday Reads: Graphic Novels

TGIF! Today’s #FridayReads are three great graphic novels:

POPPIES OF IRAQ by Brigitte Findakly & Lewis Trondheim
Findakly’s nuanced tender chronicle of her relationship with her homeland Iraq, co-written and drawn by her husband, acclaimed cartoonist Trondheim. “Small in size but large in impact, this intimate memoir is a highly relevant and compassionate story of family, community, prejudice, and the struggle to love when the forces of the world push groups apart.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

FROM LONE MOUNTAIN by John Porcellino
Porcellino shares his love of nature as he uproots his comfortable life and travels from small town to small town, experiencing America in slow motion road trip. “The rawness of Porcellino’s work, its unfiltered directness, is the essence of its charm.” — Los Angeles Times readmoreremove

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

National Parks Centennial

nationalparksNational Parks CentennialThe National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016! To celebrate, we recommend these fine nature books:

THE HOUR OF LAND: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams
A June 2016 Indie Next list pick & an O Magazine Summer 2016 Reading selection! “Williams, an ardent, often rhapsodic, always scrupulous witness to the living world and advocate for the protection of public lands, celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service in this…uniquely evocative, illuminating, profound, poignant, beautiful, courageous, and clarion book about the true significance of our national parks.” — Booklist, starred review

BEING A BEAST: Adventures Across the Species Divide by Charles Foster
A New York Times & Wall Street Journal Summer 2016 Reading selection! A passionate naturalist explores what it’s really like to be an animal—by living like them. “Fascinating… His attempts to actually be a beast make this a different sort of wildlife book.” — Booklist, starred review

Read the New York Times interview with Charles Foster on his research for BEING A BEAST.

UNDER THE STARS: How America Fell in Love with Camping by Dan White
An O Magazine Summer 2016 Reading selection! An irreverent and hilarious history of American camping from the Girl Scouts to “glamping” that celebrates the many modes and primal appeal of recreation out of doors. “In an era when visits to national parks have grown exponentially, this book is an excellent and timely choice for readers.” — Library Journal

LASSOING THE SUN: A Year in America’s National Parks by Mark Woods
Woods decided to re-create his childhood trips to national parks with his family when his mother was diagnosed with cancer, given just months to live. More than just a book about the parks, it’s about the legacies we inherit and the ones we leave behind. “A deeply heartfelt story about why the national parks remain so integral to the American story.” — Booklist readmoreremove

2016 Summer Reading Roundup

Major media declared these 27 Macmillan books Summer 2016 must-reads:
Fiction

TRULY MADLY GUILTY by Liane Moriarty (Entertainment Weekly, St. Louis Post Dispatch)
THE CHILDREN by Ann Leary (People Magazine)
THE SPORT OF KINGS by C.E. Morgan (O Magazine)
THE GOOD LIEUTENANT by Whitney Terrell (Buzzfeed)
GRIEF IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS by Max Porter (Wall Street Journal)
REDEMPTION ROAD by John Hart (St. Louis Post Dispatch)
SOME POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS by Helen Phillips (O Magazine)
A WIFE OF NOBLE CHARACTER by Yvonne Georgina Puig (St. Louis Post Dispatch)

Thrillers & Horror

THE 14TH COLONY by Steve Berry (New York Times Book Review)
THE BALLAD OF BLACK TOM by Victor LaValle (New York Times Book Review)

Nonfiction & Memoir

IN THE DARKROOM by Susan Faludi (O Magazine, People Magazine)
THE AUCTIONEER: Adventures in the Art Trade by Simon de Pury (“Good Morning America”)
THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS: Artists and the Last Age of the Exotic by Jamie James (St. Louis Post Dispatch)
LAST NIGHT, A SUPERHERO SAVED MY LIFE: Neil Gaiman!! Jodi Picoult!! Brad Meltzer!!…and an All-Star Roster on the Caped Crusaders That Changed Their Lives by Liesa Mignogna (“Good Morning America”)
NEVER A DULL MOMENT: 1971-The Year That Rock Exploded by David Hepworth (O Magazine)
THIS IS NOT MY BEAUTIFUL LIFE by Victoria Fedden (O Magazine)

Travel & Nature

BEING A BEAST: Adventures Across the Species Divide by Charles Foster (New York Times, Wall Street Journal)
Read the New York Times interview with Charles Foster on his research for BEING A BEAST!
THE HOUR OF LAND: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams (O Magazine)
FOLLOWING FISH: One Man’s Journey into the Food and Culture of the Indian Coast by Samanth Subramanian (New York Times Book Review)
HOW TO TALK ABOUT PLACES YOU’VE NEVER BEEN: On the Importance of Armchair Travel by Pierre Bayard (New York Times Book Review)
PUTIN COUNTRY by Anne Garrels (New York Times Book Review)
UNDER THE STARS: How America Fell in Love with Camping by Dan White (O Magazine)
WORLDS ELSEWHERE: Journeys Around Shakespeare’s Globe by Andrew Dickson (New York Times Book Review)

Sports

THE ONLY RULE IS IT HAS TO WORK: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team by Ben Lindbergh & Sam Miller (New York Times Book Review)

Comics

HOT DOG TASTE TEST by Lisa Hanawalt (Wall Street Journal)
MARY WEPT OVER THE FEET OF JESUS: Prostitution and Religious Obedience in the Bible by Chester Brown (New York Times Book Review)

YA

THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN by Roshani Chokshi (New York Times Book Review)

Kirkus Best Books of 2015 – Nonfiction

In addition to their Best Fiction list, Kirkus Reviews unveiled their Best of 2015 Nonfiction lists which include 20 Macmillan titles:

Best Nonfiction
GIVE US THE BALLOT: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America by Ari Berman
THE CRIME AND THE SILENCE: Confronting the Massacre of Jews in Wartime Jedwabne by Anna Bikont
IRREPRESSIBLE: The Jazz Age and Life of Henrietta Bingham by Emily Bingham
THE LAST LOVE SONG: A Biography of Joan Didion by Tracy Daugherty
THE WHITE ROAD: Journey Into an Obsession by Edmund de Waal
LEAVING ORBIT: Notes From the Last Days of American Spaceflight by Margaret Lazarus Dean
THE DEATH OF CANCER: After Fifty Years on the Front Lines of Medicine, a Pioneering Oncologist Reveals Why the War on Cancer Is Winnable—and How We Can Get There by Vincent T. DeVita, Jr., M.D., Elizabeth DeVita-Raeburn
THE INTIMATE BOND: How Animals Shaped Human History by Brian Fagan
WHIRLWIND: The American Revolution and the War that Won It by John Ferling
A KIM JONG-IL PRODUCTION: The Extraordinary True Story of a Kidnapped Filmmaker, His Star Actress, and a Young Dictator’s Rise to Power by Paul Fischer
A GUEST AT THE SHOOTERS’ BANQUET: My Grandfather’s SS Past, My Jewish Family, a Search for the Truth by Rita Gabis
SPAIN: The Center of the World, 1519-1682, by Robert Goodwin
ELEANOR MARX: A Life by Rachel Holmes
THIS IS ALL A DREAM WE DREAMED: An Oral History of the Grateful Dead by Blair Jackson & David Gans
DO NO HARM: Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh
THE ARGONAUTS by Maggie Nelson
WORLDS APART: A Memoir by David Plante
BEYOND WORDS: What Animals Think and Feel by Carl Safina
A HOUSE IN ST JOHN’S WOOD: In Search of My Parents by Matthew Spender
KL: A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps by Nikolaus Wachsmann readmoreremove

Buzz for A STING IN THE TALE

Spring is upon us, which means that everything is blooming (our sympathies to all you allergy sufferers), and where there are blooms, there are bees. 

We've got a “buzz”-worthy must-read memoir for you: A STING IN THE TALE: My Adventures with Bumblebees by Dave Goulson

One of the U.K.’s most respected conservationists and the founder of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Goulson combines light-hearted tales of a child’s growing passion for nature with a deep insight into the crucial importance of the bumblebee.

It was a finalist for the Samuel Johnson Prize and named a Barnes & Noble Discover Selection, and received rave reviews from NPR, the Seattle Times, the New York Post, and Shelf Awareness:

“A STING IN THE TALE melts memoir and conservation issues into a sweet pot, moving from subject to subject very much in the manner of a foraging bee seeking flowers… Warm and delightful: I frequently found myself wanting to put it down to go bird and bee-watching, to find for myself the species he discusses.” — Amal El-Mohtar, NPR.org

“[A STING IN THE TALE] is both a whodunit as well as a revealing study of a bug on whom we depend a great deal.” The Seattle Times

“...Goulson transforms what could be dry material with a stinging wit.” — New York Post

“A charming and highly informative narrative about the anything-but-humble bumblebee.” Shelf Awareness

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