Articles tagged "Mike Mignola"

Graphic Novels Galore!

Bam! Pow! Zowie! Make room on your library’s shelves for these new and forthcoming graphic novels:

THE ABOMINABLE MR. SEABROOK by Joe Ollmann
Two starred reviews! “Comprising 10 years of painstaking research, this graphic biography details the life of obscure writer, occultist, traveler, and bondage fanatic William Seabrook… As both a narrative and a story in pictures, this is an early candidate for the year’s best graphic biography.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

TERMS AND CONDITIONS by R. Sikoryak
“This multilevel graphic novel takes the actual texts of the terms and conditions of iTunes and translates them into comics form in the styles of a who’s who of comics–here Peanuts, there The Sandman, Dilbert, Adventure Time, and a hundred more–all narrated by Steve Jobs. Sikoryak is an undeniably talented artist with a keen ability to capture different styles, as well as a sly conceptual satirist and prankster.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

GRIM DEATH AND BILL THE ELECTROCUTED CRIMINAL by Mike Mignola & Thomas E. Sniegoski
“In this eerie illustrated horror novel set in an unspecified American city during the early days of the Great Depression, author Sniegoski and author and artist Mignola combine words and black-and-white illustrations to creepy effect in the tale of a man who has been given a new life, with a twist. Mignola and Sniegoski have created a comic book–style character who rights wrongs in a sinister, hair-raisingly enjoyable way, with an open ending that leaves room for more episodes.” — Publishers Weekly

FIRE!! THE ZORA NEALE HURSTON STORY by Peter Bagge
A bold retelling of the life of Zora Neale Hurston, from the author of WOMAN REBEL: The Margaret Sanger Story. “Bagge depicts her life in his iconic spaghetti-limbed, cheery-colored cartoon style. It’s easy to see what attracted Bagge to the material: brilliant, outrageous, prone to visions and mysticism yet fiercely pragmatic, Hurston is an irresistible character…” — Publishers Weekly

NEIL GAIMAN’S MR. HERO COMPLETE COMICS VOL. 2 by James Vance, illustrated by Ted Slampyak
Also available in trade paperback. The Mr. Hero saga concludes as Jennifer Hale finally uncovers the mysterious past of the Newmatic Man!

Even More Books for Dudes

We're big fans of Douglas Lord's Books for Dudes column over at Library Journal. Recently he reviewed a good stack of our unputdownable books, many of which left him cranky from lack of sleep.

We've picked a few choice passages from his reviews to share with you here.

THE VARIATIONS by John Donatich (available in February from Holt)

"When you see me dragging a** around work and looking kind of cranked off at the dinner table, know it’s because this book kept me up long, long after bedtime."

CHILDREN OF WRATH by Paul Grossman (available in February from St. Martin's Press)

Lord called it "an immensely satisfying, all-around winner." And said, "It was compelling enough to keep me up hours past my bedtime and once even to cause me to fall prey to that classic bedtime blunder: falling book-clutched-in-hands, glasses-on-face asleep. This was, of course, followed by the classic wake-up-90-minutes-later-completely-disoriented-and-drooling."

JOE GOLEM AND THE DROWNING CITY by Christopher Golden & Mike Mignola (available in March from St. Martin's Press)

"Mignola, the artist known for the “Hellboy” graphic novel series, and the prolific Golden, whose credits include the YA horror novel STRANGEWOOD, jointly crafted this enjoyable, steampunky YA title." He also warned, "if, like me, you decide that a large cup of coffee at 8:30 pm on a Wednesday is Just. The. Thing. You. Want., well, look no further: you’ll enjoy cranking through this and wake up with a Thursday book’n’caffeine hangover."

THE GIRL NEXT DOOR by Brad Parks (available in March from Minotaur)

Lord said it's, "breezily enjoyable," and admitted, "I skipped two prime nap times and stayed up three hours past bedtime one night, accompanied only by chocolate, tea, and my special blue blankie."

Check out the full article on LibraryJournal.com to see what else Lord recommends.

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