Articles tagged "memory"

Booklist’s Best Debuts of 2017

Booklist‘s Top 10 First Novels of 2017 list includes two of our favorite debuts:

GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
Rachel returns home to help her mother care for her father as he struggles with dementia in Khong’s tender, deadpan-funny, and affecting drama about memory, self, and caregiving.

THE RESURRECTION OF JOAN ASHBY by Cherise Wolas
Joan did not want to be a mother, and, sure enough, when she ends up with two sons, all her fears come true in Wolas’ breathtaking novel, which does for motherhood what GONE GIRL (2012) did for marriage.

Buzzfeed’s “Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer”

Buzzfeed chose eight excellent books from Macmillan as part of their “Exciting New Books You Need To Read This Summer” feature:

THE ANSWERS by Catherine Lacey
Catherine Lacey’s novel THE ANSWERS centers around people looking for the answers to love, to emotions, to ailing bodies. Mary, a young woman in New York City, is desperate for a cure for her paralyzing pain when she finally finds an effective treatment that she can’t afford. To pay for it, she joins eccentric actor Kurt Sky’s “Girlfriend Experiment” — a project for which Sky has recruited multiple women to fulfill different roles in an attempt to create the perfect romantic relationship — and becomes his “Emotional Girlfriend,” along the way learning more about herself and the nature of connection.

GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
Heartbroken after her engagement is called off and feeling that her life has become a mess, 30-year-old Ruth quits her job and goes home to her parents to take care of her father, who is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. As his condition grows worse, Ruth devotes herself to researching supplements and meals that might restore his memory. Tender yet funny in turns, GOODBYE, VITAMIN offers poignant insight into family, memory, marriage, parenthood, love, and loss.

THE CITY ALWAYS WINS by Omar Robert Hamilton
Omar Robert Hamilton’s THE CITY ALWAYS WINS is a vivid, powerful portrait of Egypt’s failed revolution in 2011. Through the eyes of Mariam and Khalil, two young people fighting at the front lines of the revolution in the streets of Cairo and its political underground, THE CITY ALWAYS WINS is an urgent and relevant work that captures the realities of class friction, war, torture, and dictatorships.

MY LIFE WITH BOB by Pamela Paul
MY LIFE WITH BOB is the ultimate book about reading books — New York Times Book Review editor Pamela Paul has kept a journal (named Bob) for 28 years, meticulously tracking every book she’s ever read. The result is an intimate look into her interior life and the ways in which the stories she has read have changed her own story. Clever and heartfelt, MY LIFE WITH BOB will appeal to anyone with a deep love for reading.
readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Graphic Novels

TGIF friends! Today’s #FridayReads are three great graphic novels for adults AND teens:

BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
One of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017! “A surreal, dreamlike sense of dread and sadness pervades many of these stories, but wry sympathy for the often lost characters takes Tamaki’s already formidable cartooning skills to a new level. Tamaki has delivered an essential collection of truly modern fiction in comics form.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

ONE! HUNDRED! DEMONS! by Lynda Barry
“Drawn and painted with exuberant colors and florid emotions and inspired by a Zen painting exercise, the stories are taken mostly from her childhood and frequently play with the limits of memory. This is a book with subtle power; readers may well end up in tears, but they might not be able to say why.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Our #FridayReads are outta-this-world new sci-fi & fantasy titles, all on library shelves now!

BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
One of Publishers Weekly‘s Best Books of Summer 2017 and Buzzfeed’s “Incredible New Books You Need To Read This Spring” with THREE starred reviews! “VanderMeer, author of the acclaimed Southern Reach trilogy, has made a career out of eluding genre classifications, and with BORNE he essentially invents a new one. Reading like a dispatch from a world lodged somewhere between science fiction, myth, and a video game, the textures of BORNE shift as freely as those of the titular whatsit.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

WALKAWAY by Cory Doctorow
Two starred reviews! Cory Doctorow’s first adult novel in eight years: a “sweeping epic” (Booklist, starred review) of revolution, love, post-scarcity, and the end of death. “A truly visionary techno-thriller that not only depicts how we might live tomorrow, but asks why we don’t already.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

VOID STAR by Zachary Mason
Two starred reviews! A riveting, beautifully written, fugue-like novel of AIs, memory, violence, and mortality set in a near-future San Francisco. “Mason’s follow-up to THE LOST BOOKS OF THE ODYSSEY is a complex and spellbinding tale of a future where self-preservation, in every sense of the word, is a victory.” — Library Journal, starred review

WINTER TIDE by Ruthanna Emrys
In Emrys’s debut novel, the last daughter of the people of Innsmouth must return to the ruins of her home, gather the scraps of her stolen history, and assemble a new family to face the darkest of human politics and the wildest dangers of an uncaring universe. “Marbled with references to the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft, this inventive dark fantasy crossbreeds the cosmic horrors of the Cthulhu mythos with the espionage escapades of a Cold War thriller.” — Publishers Weekly

Share your #FridayReads with us @MacmillanLib. Happy weekend!

Happy #BookBday (4/11/17 Edition)

Oh what a lovely day for a #BookBday!

ONE PERFECT LIE by Lisa Scottoline
In New York Times bestselling Scottoline’s latest novel of domestic suspense, the single mother of a shy but athletically gifted high school pitcher worries that her son is being led astray by a rich, charismatic teammate hiding a dangerous past. Add a handsome stranger posing as a new teacher and the mix becomes combustible. “This stand-alone suspense novel is not to be missed by Scottoline’s fans as well as other readers who relish fast-paced thrillers by Linda Fairstein and John Grisham.” — Library Journal

VOID STAR by Zachary Mason
A riveting, beautifully written, fugue-like novel of AIs, memory, violence, and mortality set in a near-future San Francisco. “Mason’s follow-up to THE LOST BOOKS OF THE ODYSSEY is a complex and spellbinding tale of a future where self-preservation, in every sense of the word, is a victory.” — Library Journal, starred review

AND THEN THERE WAS ME by Sadeqa Johnson
The story of Bea, a woman wrestling with motherhood, an unfaithful husband, and a friend who may not be who she seems, all while trying to make sense of her new neighborhood. “Combining the warmth and sisterhood of Terry McMillan’s novels and the tragedies and healing of those from Kristin Hannah, this book should find a wide, satisfied readership.” — Booklist readmoreremove

Maximum Shelf: THE FORGETTING TIME

MaxShelf-Forgetting TimeToday’s #FridayReads pick is also a Maximum Shelf Awareness feature: THE FORGETTING TIME by Sharon Guskin.

First-time novelist Guskin looks at choices, regret and second chances in the powerful story of a little boy who remembers life as someone else and the adults who struggle to help him find peace.

“Intercut with excerpted case studies from actual past-life researcher Dr. Jim Tucker’s Life Before Life: Children’s Memories of Previous Lives, Guskin’s drama is honest, even comforting, but never gimmicky. She challenges readers to dream beyond conventional boundaries and consider that human consciousness may be more complicated and far-reaching than science or Western religion believe. At the same time, her grasp of the beauty and ferocity of a mother’s love grounds the story in a frame anyone can accept. The complex but graceful knitting together of the story’s loose ends will give the reader a sense of balance and lightness that comes from remembering how many unexplained wonders the universe has in store for all of us.” — Shelf Awareness

“Readers will be galvanized by Guskin’s sharply realized and sympathetic characters with all their complications, contradictions, failures, sorrows, and hope. Deftly braiding together suspense, family drama, and keen insights into the workings of the brain, Guskin poses key and unsettling questions about love and memory, life and death, belief and fact. A novel that bridges the fuzzy categories of ‘literary’ and ‘commercial,’ THE FORGETTING TIME offers a vast spectrum of significant and nuanced topics that will catalyze probing discussions.” Booklist, starred review

A February 2016 Indie Next pick!

Click here to read the full Shelf Awareness summary, review and full interview with Sharon Guskin.
readmoreremove

Daring Debut: THE MEMORY PAINTER

Friends, we’re a bit obsessed with Gwendolen Womack’s THE MEMORY PAINTER. This riveting debut novel is a taut thriller and a timeless love story spanning six continents and 10,000 years of history that stems from this idea: What if neuroscientists accidentally unlocked the secret to reincarnation with a drug?

It’s an Indie Next pick for May 2015 and Gwendolen Womack did a feature interview in Library Journal about the book (they loved it—see the starred review below)!
Plus, this fabulous book trailer conveys the cinematic reading experience:

Praise for THE MEMORY PAINTER:

“It’s best not to try to analyze the ambitious plot of this thriller, which combines romance, fantasy, and adventure; just hang on for a wild and entertaining ride around the world and through the centuries back to ancient Egypt.”
Library Journal, starred review

“Well-drawn historical flashbacks, engaging characters, and a twisty ending make this thrilling blend of neuroscience, romance, and ancient worlds good bets for Da Vinci Code and Outlander fans.” — Booklist

“Womack makes a romantic case for the existence of destiny…and does a beautiful job… Dive into this sweeping, romantic journey that will leave you breathless and a little unsure of where in time you’ve landed.” — Kirkus Reviews

readmoreremove

css.php