Articles tagged "Mark Kurlansky"

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

Nonfiction Stars

The stars are aligning for these new and forthcoming nonfiction books:

HAVANA: A Subtropical Delirium by Mark Kurlansky
“This little gem of a book by the prolific Kurlansky is a revelation. At a most auspicious moment in the history of Cuba and Havana, Kurlansky, who has spent much time in the country as a journalist, writes an eloquent love letter to one of the world’s great cities.” — Booklist, starred review

“This extremely readable book is not preachy, not dogmatic, not shrill. As in life, there is a mixture of both good and evil, and Kurlansky, a frequent Cuba correspondent, covers it well.” Library Journal, starred review

FEAR CITY: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein
“Phillips-Fein, professor of history at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, makes municipal bonds exciting in this painstakingly researched revisionist account of the 1970s fiscal crisis that shook New York to its core. The book should be required reading for all those interested in the past, present, and future of democratic politics.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Sobering, smart reading with many pointed lessons for activists.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review
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ALA Midwinter 2016 – Friday Events

It’s opening day for ALA Midwinter 2016! Come by the Macmillan (adult) booth #1806 and kick off a great conference by attending these events:

ALA ERT/Booklist Author Forum with Terry Tempest Williams
4:00-5:15pm
Boston Convention and Exhibit Center | BCEC Ballroom West

Award-winning author Terry Tempest Williams will discuss her new book, THE HOUR OF LAND: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks as part of a panel including documentarian Ken Burns and creative nonfiction writer Mark Kurlansky, moderated by Booklist‘s Donna Seaman. A book signing will follow the program.
Click here to download a recording of the event!

In-booth signing with Roshani Chokshi
5:30-7:00pm
Boston Convention and Exhibit Center | Booth #1806

Roshani Chokshi will sign complimentary copies of her YA novel, THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN.

Check out our other events and follow the action on Twitter, hashtag #alamw16!

Macmillan Library @ ALA Midwinter 2016 (Booth #1806)

We’re ridiculously excited to see you in the Macmillan (adult) booth #1806 and at all of our great events at ALA Midwinter in Boston next month. Check out our schedule below and RSVP ASAP!
Friday, January 8

ALA ERT/Booklist Author Forum with Terry Tempest Williams
4:00-5:15pm
Boston Convention and Exhibit Center | BCEC Ballroom West

Award-winning author Terry Tempest Williams will discuss her new book, THE HOUR OF LAND: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks as part of a panel including documentarian Ken Burns and creative nonfiction writer Mark Kurlansky, moderated by Booklist‘s Donna Seaman. A book signing will follow the program.
Click here to download a recording of the event.

In-booth signing with Roshani Chokshi
5:30-7:00pm
Boston Convention and Exhibit Center | Booth #1806

Roshani Chokshi will sign complimentary copies of her YA novel, THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN.

Saturday, January 9

Auditorium Speaker Series with Isaac Mizrahi
10:00-11:00am
Boston Convention and Exhibit Center | BCEC Ballroom West

Listen to fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi discuss his forthcoming memoir I.M. which covers his growing up gay and overweight in a Jewish orthodox community in Brooklyn, his days at the High School of Performing Arts and Parsons School of Design, the waning days of Studio 54, and his rise in the fashion and business worlds.
Click here to download a recording of the event. readmoreremove

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