Articles tagged "Mahnaz Dar"

LJ Fall 2018 Editors’ Picks

We’ve got two of Library Journal’s Fall 2018 Editors’ Picks!

“Twenty-five years after her groundbreaking RECLAIMING OPHELIA, which examined the lives of adolescent girls, psychologist Mary Pipher addresses the concerns of their older sisters in WOMEN ROWING NORTH: Navigating Life’s Currents and Flourishing as We Age (Bloomsbury USA, Jan. 2019) as they transition into late middle age. This is bound to become the bible of baby boomer women.” — Wilda Williams, former Fiction Editor, LJ Reviews

“Narrators who are revealed to be murderers and presumed-dead victims who show up in the second act: the bizarre twists of suspense novels have shocked me for years. Now that I’m a little older and a lot more jaded, Japanese author Keigo ­Higashino is the rare writer who still astonishes me—not with unexpected twists but with elegantly matter-of-fact prose, tightly crafted plots, and intriguing premises. Every year, I hope that another of his books has been translated into English; though he has dozens of novels to his name, most are available only in Japanese. I am being rewarded now with the sinuous NEWCOMER (Minotaur: St. Martin’s, Oct.). While the work centers on Mineko Mitsui, a middle-aged divorcée who is strangled in the Nihonbashi area of Tokyo, Higashino takes his time getting to her, first wending his way through the neighborhood shopkeepers whose lives briefly intersected with hers. The result is a complex and moving mystery that’s eventually solved by the astute Detective Kaga, whom fans may remember from MALICE.” Mahnaz Dar, Reference and Professional Reading Editor

LJ’s Spring 2017 Editors’ Picks

Library Journal recently revealed their Spring 2017 Editors’ Picks, including these three Macmillan books:

“Like many, I have always had an appreciation for all things Jane Austen, whether it be her original novels, their many retellings, or watching Colin Firth as Darcy famously emerge from a lake in a billowy white shirt. Now I’m awaiting Lucy Worsley’s JANE AUSTEN AT HOME (St. Martin’s, Jul.), which sees the author on an enviable research trip through Austen’s many residences, including childhood and holiday houses, schools, and the abodes of relatives. Worsley connects these spaces back to the fictional dwellings of Austen’s characters, emphasizing the thematic importance of home.” — Kate DiGirolomo, SELF-e Community Coordinator
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