Articles tagged "libraries"

2017 Tri State Children’s/YA Book Buzz Titles

Today is the Tri-State Children’s/YA Book Buzz!

Anne presented her favorite books for teens from Flatiron YA and Griffin Teen and told everyone about our new imprint, Wednesday Books! Best of all? Ali Fisher co-presented and our fur babies Kugel and Jackson kept things moving along as librarians tweeted via #bookbuzznyc.

Jackson+Kugel

WONDERFUL FEELS LIKE THIS by Sara Lövestam | Out: March 7, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250095237 | Hardcover | Performing Arts/Music | Ages 12 to 18
A CROWN OF WISHES by Roshani Chokshi | Out: March 28, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250085498 | Hardcover | Fantasy/Epic | Ages 13 to 18
THE STAR-TOUCHED QUEEN by Roshani Chokshi | Out: March 28, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250100207 | Paperback | Fantasy/Epic | Ages 13 to 19 (also available in hardcover)
DEAR READER by Mary O’Connell | Out: May 9, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250077080 | Hardcover | Books & Libraries | Ages 12 to 18
AFTERCARE INSTRUCTIONS by Bonnie Pipkin | Out: June 27, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250114846 | Hardcover | Social Themes/Pregnancy | Ages 12 to 18
I AM A SECRET SERVICE AGENT: My Life Spent Protecting the President by Dan Emmett | Out: June 6, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250130303 | Hardcover | Biography & Autobiography/Political | Ages 12 to 18
THE INEVITABLE COLLISION OF BIRDIE & BASH by Candace Ganger | Out: July 25, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250116222 | Hardcover | Romance/Contemporary | Ages 12 to 18
GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS: AMAZING ANIMALS by Guinness World Records | Out: August 29, 2017 | ISBN: 9781910561621 | Paperback | Nonfiction/Animals | Ages 6 to 10
GIRLS MADE OF SNOW AND GLASS by Melissa Bashardoust | Out: September 5, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250077738 | Hardcover | Fairy Tales & Folklore | Ages 12 and Up
SUN WARRIOR (Tales of a New World series) | P.C. Cast | 9781250100757 | Oct. 17 | Hardcover | Fantasy/Contemporary | Ages 12-18
MOON CHOSEN (Tales of a New World series) | P.C. Cast | 9781250100733 | Oct. 17 | Trade Paperback | Fantasy/Contemporary | Ages 12-18
I HATE EVERYONE BUT YOU by Gaby Dunn & Allison Raskin | Out: September 19, 2017 | ISBN: 9781250129321 | Hardcover | Girls & Women | Ages 14 to 19

Download the PDF handout and check out our full Books for Teens 2017 lineup.

Join us for SLJ’s Day of Dialog 2017!

School Library Journal‘s Day of Dialog 2017 registration is now open!!

Join us & School Library Journal in NYC for the most anticipated librarian-only gathering of the year and be informed, inspired, and entertained by the best authors, editors, and publishers in the industry. Spend the day discussing the latest trends and get the inside scoop on the hottest books in the world of children’s and young adult literature.

This event includes a full day of panels and speaker presentations by celebrated authors as well as breakfast, lunch, and a closing reception. Attendees enjoy access to exclusive author signings, free ARCs and an opportunity to network with colleagues from around the country in an intimate library-centric setting. Get a first look at exciting titles due out this fall and walk away with bags filled with books and inspiring ideas for your libraries and classrooms.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 from 9am–6pm
NYU Kimmel Center
60 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012

Seating is limited, so RSVP right away.

Click here for more information and to RSVP.

Hope to see you there!

Marie Marquardt on Immigrants, Issues & the Healing Power of Libraries

Last year, Marie Marquardt leapt onto the YA scene with her debut novel, DREAM THINGS TRUE, a modern-day Romeo and Juliet story in which a wealthy Southern boy falls in love with an undocumented Mexican girl and together they face perils in their hostile Georgia town. Her second YA novel, THE RADIUS OF US, explores the American dream again, but this time through the lenses of two traumatized teens who find healing in love.

Marie Marquardt has a message for librarians, but first, we’re offering complimentary advance readers copies of THE RADIUS OF US to any U.S.-based librarian who requests one (limited quantity available).

To get your copy, email Library@MacmillanUSA.com from your professional/library-issued e-mail address (subject: Radius of Us) and don’t forget to include your library’s mailing address.

Take it away, Marie!

Dear YA Librarian,

I am thrilled to write to you about my new young adult novel, THE RADIUS OF US, which will be published by St. Martin’s Press on January 17, 2017. As a story featuring immigrants and asylum-seekers seeking refuge in the United States, this book addresses timely and important themes, and I hope you’ll be willing to tell your young patrons about it.

I’ve spent two decades working with Latin American immigrant families in the South. I also run a non-profit called El Refugio that serves immigrants and asylum-seekers in detention. This work inspired my debut novel, DREAM THINGS TRUE, which was published in 2015. To research THE RADIUS OF US, I traveled to El Salvador and to detention facilities across the U.S., where I met with teenagers fleeing gang violence and seeking asylum.

Told in alternating first person points of view, THE RADIUS OF US is a story of love, sacrifice, and the journey from victim to survivor. It’s about a boy from El Salvador, who ran from a city torn-through with violence, looking for a safe place to call home. It’s about an American girl who no longer feels safe anywhere, except maybe when she’s with him. And most importantly, THE RADIUS OF US is about two people struggling to overcome trauma and find healing in love.

I’m especially enthusiastic to share this story with librarians and library patrons, because for thirty-three years, libraries have been my refuge, and librarians have been the ones that welcomed me in. readmoreremove

Library Penance

Caution: serving a community sentence in a library for a minor crime may lead to a career as a mystery writer! It happened to Lance Hawvermale. He shares his experience below and explains how libraries continue to inspire him today:

I once served mandatory community service in a library.

As a crime writer, I need a good run-in with the law as part of my backstory, even if the crime in question was victimless and endangered no one but myself. The judge explained that the infraction would not appear on my permanent record if I agreed to perform 20 hours of service to my fellow Americans… in the local library.

Yes, Your Honor. I was born in that briar patch.

Flashback: A boy with neo-hippie hair is too slow for the track team and too easily bored for wood shop, and so he seeks refuge in the school library. Immediately to his left sits Ray Bradbury (Something Wicked This Way Comes), and on his right is William Goldman (Marathon Man). In between them, the boy feels safe. Safe from bullies. Safe from chemistry class. Safe from the possibility of having to say hello to a real live girl. As that very boy, I can tell you that courage can be shoveled from library shelves. I stormed the Bastille from that poorly padded chair; I followed Poe to a woman in a premature tomb; I stood on the docks beside Jay Gatsby and admired a light on a distant shore. But while I read one chapter after the next, Bradbury kept pushing my hand from the books toward my own pen and paper. He told me to strip-mine metaphors from these pages and then to write about the ore I discovered. The school librarian, at least, thought I was cool.

Flash-forward: This year my novel FACE BLIND is released by Minotaur Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press. readmoreremove

Elsa Hart’s Chinese Library Adventure

Two weeks ago, Elsa Hart‘s fabulous debut, JADE DRAGON MOUNTAIN, about an 18th-century exiled librarian who must learn the truth about a Jesuit priest’s death, arrived on shelves and is raking in rave reviews!

“In addition to being a satisfying mystery, JADE DRAGON MOUNTAIN also powerfully evokes the aesthetics of the time and place it describes. Its visual vistas often resemble centuries-old watercolors…” — The Wall Street Journal

“…perfectly melds history with the mystery genre for a lush look at China on the cusp of change…. one of the year’s most engrossing debuts and establishes Hart as an author to watch.” — Associated Press

“Hart’s sure command of historical complexities, conflicts between cultures, and plot twists leads to a satisfying conclusion.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The mix of history, thriller, and layers of storytelling make for a complex and rewarding novel that deserves a wide readership.” — Library Journal

“Part mystery, part exploration of a culture fading into history’s shadows, Hart’s novel is a fascinating, intelligent debut…. Think Agatha Christie writing Shogun—Hart’s captivating debut has solid cross-genre appeal.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Decorated with a careful attention to detail, this old-fashioned mystery suits its setting in atmosphere and pacing, drawing the reader into an exotic territory. …the first in a series sure to please fans of Laura Joh Rowland’s Sano Ichiro mysteries, set in Japan, and those who enjoyed the magical Malaysian setting of Tan Twan Eng’s Garden of Evening Mists.” — Booklist

How did Elsa Hart get such fabulous detail in her book? Why, research on location, natch! Here’s a piece she wrote about an encounter in the out-of-date foreign language collection of a provincial Chinese library…

I am sitting in my quiet little corner of the library. My chair is in a recess so all anyone can see of me is a dirty blue converse sneaker. I can hear Sherlock Holmes: “But the shoes reveal everything, Watson. Observe the heels, emblazoned ALI STRS, an approximation of the authentic ALL STAR logo. They were obviously purchased in China. They are dirty, which means she has had them for a while, but not long enough to know that the accepted practice is to take shoes to the laundry in order to maintain their clean appearance. The style of the shoes, familiar and therefore comforting, suggests she anticipates homesickness. She is using a library card as a bookmark, which means she has established proof of residence in the city. Clearly she has not been in China long, but intends to stay for some time.” readmoreremove

Library Apocalypse!

Calm down, friends—it’s not the end of libraries! BONES & ALL author Camille DeAngelis wrote the following piece about the future of libraries after being inspired by a photo essay of the abandoned Mark Twain branch of the Detroit Public Library:

DetroitPublicLibraryFlickr

“Lack of blood spatter notwithstanding, the Mark Twain branch of the Detroit Public Library looks like a set out of The Walking Dead.”

Not so long ago a link went bouncing around my little corner of the Twitterverse, a Flickr set of an abandoned library in Detroit. A photographer named Brandon P. Davis had let himself into the building to document the state of the place—closed in 1996 for renovations, for which the funding obviously never materialized—and now my bookish internet friends were retweeting the link with words like “heartbreaking” and “upsetting.”

I grew up in an affluent community ten minutes down the highway from Camden, New Jersey—a city that, like Detroit, many people seem to regard as a lost cause in every sense of the phrase. In the summer of 2010 Camden came horrifyingly close to shutting its three city library branches, until the county system agreed to take over. Library administrators understand far better than legislators do that a community, any community, needs a library more than it does a police force. Do away with the former, and you ensure that the latter will always have entirely too much work to do.

So heartbreaking is, indeed, the most appropriate choice of adjectives. Years’ worth of water damage has left the old cathedral ceilings of the Detroit library gaping in despair, dropping shower after shower of plaster chips on the books scattered across the floor. The pointed archways above the half-furled blueprints and overturned tables evoke a sort of defunct sacredness, as if this place were a temple dedicated to gods no one believes in anymore. Lack of blood spatter notwithstanding, the Mark Twain branch of the Detroit Public Library looks like a set out of The Walking Dead.

I clicked through Brandon Davis’s photoset and wondered: will anyone use the public library once the apocalypse hits? readmoreremove

We Love Books About Books

Who can resist books about books and libraries? We can't! Here's just a few of the latest titles we're into (Caution: some books may include kittens):

WHY I READ: The Serious Pleasure of Books by Wendy Lesser
Founder of the Threepenny Review, Lesser's "delectably sophisticated inquiry into why reading is a constant source of pleasure and provocation" (Booklist) is as much a memoir as it is about the craft of literature. Written in "erudite, beautiful passages," WHY I READ "will speak to booklovers of all types." – Publishers Weekly, starred review. If you're attending ALA Midwinter, make sure to meet Wendy Lesser in booth #622!

WHAT MAKE THIS BOOK SO GREAT by Jo Walton
This collection of Tor.com blog posts from Hugo and Nebula Award–winning author Walton about her favorites works of sci-fi and fantasy is "...akin to a genre version of Nancy Pearl's BOOK LUST." (Library Journal, starred review) "For readers unschooled in the history of SF/F, this book is a treasure trove; for those who recognize every title, Walton evokes the joy of returning to a well-worn favorite." – Publishers Weekly, starred review

THE SHELF: From LEQ to LES: Adventures in Extreme Reading by Phyllis Rose
No, this isn't reading while rappelling down a mountain like we hoped, but it is still an extreme library sport: to read through an entire shelf of library books. In Rose's case, her randomly chosen shelf of fiction from LEQ to LES contained a classic she has not read, a remarkable variety of authors, and a range of literary styles from mystery to humor. Perhaps it'll inspire similar challenges in your library!

Now that we're thinking about cats, here are 21 cats who are secretly excellent readers!

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eBooks for Libraries – Now With More eBooks!

happy cat

Happy Monday! We're starting the week off with some wonderful news: We have expanded our library e-lending pilot program to include Macmillan's entire e-book backlist--more than 11,000 titles!

Here are some popularly requested and newly available e-books that might be of interest to your library:

NIGHT by Elie Wiesel
WOLF HALL by Hilary Mantel
A LONG WAY GONE by Ishmael Beah
THE MARRIAGE PLOT by Jeffrey Eugenides
KILLING LINCOLN by Bill O'Reilly
ENDER'S GAME by Orson Scott Card
THE EYE OF THE WORLD by Robert Jordan
THE HUSBAND LIST by Janet Evanovich & Dorien Kelly
WHERE WE BELONG by Emily Giffin
HOME FRONT by Kristin Hannah
LOOK AGAIN by Lisa Scottoline
THE AMERICAN HEIRESS by Daisy Goodwin
A WRINKLE IN TIME by Madeleine L'Engle
SPEAK by Laurie Halse Anderson
HIDDEN by P.C. Cast

E-books are available for purchase through our partners at Baker & Taylor, OverDrive, 3M, and Recorded Books. Once purchased, they will be available to lend for two years or 52 lends, whichever comes first.

We've created a dedicated section on our website called eBooks for Libraries where you can download a spreadsheet of all available Macmillan e-books. The spreadsheet will be updated as new title information becomes available, so please be mindful of the "as of date” at the bottom of the page.

We know that reaching readers in the digital age is vital to the success and endurance of libraries. We hope that e-book lending allows you to expand your offerings, facilitate the discovery of new authors, and ultimately serve your patrons better. Happy reading!

My Ali in PW – she’s all grown up!!

Because I know that Ali won't toot her own horn, I'm happily doing it for her.  Check out the fantastic piece that Ali wrote in this week's Publishers Weekly. Way to go, Ali!


 

Karin Slaughter loves libraries!

No, she's not a Macmillan author, yet... 🙂 So why do we love her? Because she loves libraries. Please read her amazing essay about the importance of libraries here. Go on girl!

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