Articles tagged "Librarians"

We’re Thankful For… Kugel!

Thanksgiving is tomorrow (we’re off this afternoon through the rest of the week), and we have so many things to be thankful for: good books, lovely librarians, friends and family. Especially the newest member of the Sherer family, Kugel Noodle Pudding! This cute Corgi puppy (yes, a dog!) is melting hearts everywhere she goes.

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Marie Marquardt on Immigrants, Issues & the Healing Power of Libraries

Last year, Marie Marquardt leapt onto the YA scene with her debut novel, DREAM THINGS TRUE, a modern-day Romeo and Juliet story in which a wealthy Southern boy falls in love with an undocumented Mexican girl and together they face perils in their hostile Georgia town. Her second YA novel, THE RADIUS OF US, explores the American dream again, but this time through the lenses of two traumatized teens who find healing in love.

Marie Marquardt has a message for librarians, but first, we’re offering complimentary advance readers copies of THE RADIUS OF US to any U.S.-based librarian who requests one (limited quantity available).

To get your copy, email Library@MacmillanUSA.com from your professional/library-issued e-mail address (subject: Radius of Us) and don’t forget to include your library’s mailing address.

Take it away, Marie!

Dear YA Librarian,

I am thrilled to write to you about my new young adult novel, THE RADIUS OF US, which will be published by St. Martin’s Press on January 17, 2017. As a story featuring immigrants and asylum-seekers seeking refuge in the United States, this book addresses timely and important themes, and I hope you’ll be willing to tell your young patrons about it.

I’ve spent two decades working with Latin American immigrant families in the South. I also run a non-profit called El Refugio that serves immigrants and asylum-seekers in detention. This work inspired my debut novel, DREAM THINGS TRUE, which was published in 2015. To research THE RADIUS OF US, I traveled to El Salvador and to detention facilities across the U.S., where I met with teenagers fleeing gang violence and seeking asylum.

Told in alternating first person points of view, THE RADIUS OF US is a story of love, sacrifice, and the journey from victim to survivor. It’s about a boy from El Salvador, who ran from a city torn-through with violence, looking for a safe place to call home. It’s about an American girl who no longer feels safe anywhere, except maybe when she’s with him. And most importantly, THE RADIUS OF US is about two people struggling to overcome trauma and find healing in love.

I’m especially enthusiastic to share this story with librarians and library patrons, because for thirty-three years, libraries have been my refuge, and librarians have been the ones that welcomed me in. readmoreremove

All’s Fair in Love – LJ Genre Spotlight on Romance

Love is in the air at Library Journal! Their recent genre spotlight on romance includes these steamy Macmillan reads:
HISTORY OR HER STORY?

Kerrigan Byrne’s THE DUKE (St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), the fourth installment in her “Victorian Rebels” series, features a nurse by day/spy by night who gets tangled up with a duke who has lost a hand as a prisoner of war.

PLAYTIME

Addison Fox’s AT LAST (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Nov.) stars a former NFL hero who walks away from the pros and clashes with a Brooklyn brewery owner.

While the traditional games will continue to thrive, the genre is broadening to include new and ever more exciting sports. Consider Rebecca Yarros’s WILDER (Entangled, Sept.), which features a five-time X Games (extreme sports) champion.

MORE THAN BRAWN

Romantic suspense is also getting tech-savvy with a heroine computer hacker in Sarah Castille’s new “Ruin & Revenge” series, which begins with NICO (St. Martin’s, Dec.).

Even our favorite professionals, librarians, are coming out in force with Dawn Ryder’s suspenseful DEEP INTO TROUBLE (St. Martins, Mar. 2017). This third title in her “Unbroken Heroes” series matches up a library worker with a special agent.

LOVE FROM ANOTHER WORLD

Romance writers have taken on the epic fantasy and sf tales with crossovers that transcend genre boundaries. Jacqueline Carey is no stranger to epic fantasy that also delights romance readers with strongly sensual, erotic plots, such as her “­Kushiel’s Legacy Trilogies.” Carey here retells Shakespeare’s The Tempest in a tale of forbidden love, MIRANDA AND CALIBAN (Tor, Feb. 2017).

For sf romance lovers, marriage and divorce give way to seven-year contracts in Erin Lyon’s I LOVE YOU SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Forge, Jan. 2017).

Paranormal romance interest remains strong. Cathy Clamp’s second “Luna Lake” title, ILLICIT (Tor, Nov.), features shifters from dueling bear clans.

HIT AND MYTH

Fairy tale and myth retellings are also keeping paranormal romance in view. Monique Patterson, executive editor and editorial director of romance for St. Martin’s Press, thinks that “retellings never waned in romance and have been happening across all the romance subgenres.” The press is releasing Kerrelyn Sparks’s new “Embraced” series, which opens with a reimagining of Beauty and the Beast, HOW TO TAME A BEAST IN SEVEN DAYS (Mar. 2017).

Christine Warren proves that animals are not the only shifters around with HARD TO HANDLE (St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), the fifth entry in her “Gargoyles” series.

In debut author Madhuri Pavamani’s new dark and erotic “The Keeper” series, an assassin must kill a target that has nine lives. The series begins with DUTCH (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), quickly followed by JUMA (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Mar. 2017).

A DIVERSE UNIVERSE

All readers deserve books that represent their individuality. For years, many publishers have developed imprints dedicated to multicultural fiction, others to ­LGBTQ+ works, while still others increasingly offer a broader selection of materials, whether related to ethnicity, sexual orientation, abilities, age, or body type. Diverse titles we’ve seen are predominantly from African American authors (and feature African American characters).

Tracy Brown’s BOSS (Griffin: St. Martin’s, Jan. 2017), a contemporary reimagining of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, has been likened to the immensely popular TV shows Empire and Scandal. readmoreremove

Maximum Shelf: THE BOOK OF SPECULATION

MaxShelf-BookOfSpeculation“I came across this book at auction as part of a larger lot I purchased on speculation. The damage renders it useless to me, but a name inside it led me to believe it might be of interest to you or your family…”

Last week’s Maximum Shelf Awareness featured a first novel near and dear to our hearts (and librarians’ hearts): THE BOOK OF SPECULATION by Erika Swyler.

Simon Watson, a young librarian, lives alone in a house that is slowly crumbling toward the Long Island Sound. His parents are long dead. His mother, a circus mermaid who made her living by holding her breath, drowned in the very water his house overlooks. His younger sister, Enola, ran off to join the circus six years ago.

One June day, an old book arrives on Simon’s doorstep. Fragile and water damaged, the book is a log from the owner of a traveling carnival in the 1700s, who reports strange and magical things—including the drowning death of a circus mermaid. Since then, generations of “mermaids” in Simon’s family have drowned—always on July 24, which is only weeks away.

As his friend Alice looks on with alarm, Simon becomes increasingly worried about his sister. Could there be a curse on Simon’s family? What does it have to do with the book, and can he stop it in time to save Enola?

“The meandering plot offers many charms: likable, quirky librarians; circus menageries and freak shows; love stories; tarot cards and trickery; mysticism; family secrets; and prickly sibling love—all accompanied by the author’s illustrations. [Swyler also painstakingly hand-bound, gilded and aged her manuscript submissions, in imitation of the old book in her story.] In short, THE BOOK OF SPECULATION, like the book at its center, promises to grasp the reader with a supernatural force and not let go.” — Shelf Awareness

See the full summary, review and interview with Erika Swyler on Shelf-Awareness.com. readmoreremove

My Ali in PW – she’s all grown up!!

Because I know that Ali won't toot her own horn, I'm happily doing it for her.  Check out the fantastic piece that Ali wrote in this week's Publishers Weekly. Way to go, Ali!


 

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