Articles tagged "LGBTQ"

2016 Triangle Awards Finalists

The 2016 Publishing Triangle Awards finalists, honoring the best LGBTQ fiction, nonfiction and poetry, as well as the year’s best trans and gender-variant literature, include these six Macmillan books:

Randy Shilts Award for Gay Nonfiction
THE NARROW DOOR by Paul Lisicky (Graywolf Press)

Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry
BESTIARY by Donika Kelly (Graywolf Press)

Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry
RAPTURE by Sjohnna McCray (Graywolf Press)

Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction
HIDE by Matthew Griffin (Bloomsbury USA)

Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction
MOONSTONE by Sjón; translated by Victoria Cribb (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
THEY MAY NOT MEAN TO, BUT THEY DO by Cathleen Schine (Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus and Giroux) readmoreremove

All’s Fair in Love – LJ Genre Spotlight on Romance

Love is in the air at Library Journal! Their recent genre spotlight on romance includes these steamy Macmillan reads:
HISTORY OR HER STORY?

Kerrigan Byrne’s THE DUKE (St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), the fourth installment in her “Victorian Rebels” series, features a nurse by day/spy by night who gets tangled up with a duke who has lost a hand as a prisoner of war.

PLAYTIME

Addison Fox’s AT LAST (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Nov.) stars a former NFL hero who walks away from the pros and clashes with a Brooklyn brewery owner.

While the traditional games will continue to thrive, the genre is broadening to include new and ever more exciting sports. Consider Rebecca Yarros’s WILDER (Entangled, Sept.), which features a five-time X Games (extreme sports) champion.

MORE THAN BRAWN

Romantic suspense is also getting tech-savvy with a heroine computer hacker in Sarah Castille’s new “Ruin & Revenge” series, which begins with NICO (St. Martin’s, Dec.).

Even our favorite professionals, librarians, are coming out in force with Dawn Ryder’s suspenseful DEEP INTO TROUBLE (St. Martins, Mar. 2017). This third title in her “Unbroken Heroes” series matches up a library worker with a special agent.

LOVE FROM ANOTHER WORLD

Romance writers have taken on the epic fantasy and sf tales with crossovers that transcend genre boundaries. Jacqueline Carey is no stranger to epic fantasy that also delights romance readers with strongly sensual, erotic plots, such as her “­Kushiel’s Legacy Trilogies.” Carey here retells Shakespeare’s The Tempest in a tale of forbidden love, MIRANDA AND CALIBAN (Tor, Feb. 2017).

For sf romance lovers, marriage and divorce give way to seven-year contracts in Erin Lyon’s I LOVE YOU SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Forge, Jan. 2017).

Paranormal romance interest remains strong. Cathy Clamp’s second “Luna Lake” title, ILLICIT (Tor, Nov.), features shifters from dueling bear clans.

HIT AND MYTH

Fairy tale and myth retellings are also keeping paranormal romance in view. Monique Patterson, executive editor and editorial director of romance for St. Martin’s Press, thinks that “retellings never waned in romance and have been happening across all the romance subgenres.” The press is releasing Kerrelyn Sparks’s new “Embraced” series, which opens with a reimagining of Beauty and the Beast, HOW TO TAME A BEAST IN SEVEN DAYS (Mar. 2017).

Christine Warren proves that animals are not the only shifters around with HARD TO HANDLE (St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), the fifth entry in her “Gargoyles” series.

In debut author Madhuri Pavamani’s new dark and erotic “The Keeper” series, an assassin must kill a target that has nine lives. The series begins with DUTCH (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Feb. 2017), quickly followed by JUMA (Swerve: St. Martin’s, Mar. 2017).

A DIVERSE UNIVERSE

All readers deserve books that represent their individuality. For years, many publishers have developed imprints dedicated to multicultural fiction, others to ­LGBTQ+ works, while still others increasingly offer a broader selection of materials, whether related to ethnicity, sexual orientation, abilities, age, or body type. Diverse titles we’ve seen are predominantly from African American authors (and feature African American characters).

Tracy Brown’s BOSS (Griffin: St. Martin’s, Jan. 2017), a contemporary reimagining of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, has been likened to the immensely popular TV shows Empire and Scandal. readmoreremove

Anna-Marie McLemore on sharing #allourlight

We cannot wait for the world to read Anna-Marie McLemore’s amazing second book, WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS. It’s been longlisted for the 2016 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature (SQUEE!!!) and has received three outstanding starred reviews.

When Anna-Marie thought of who to dedicate her second book to, she thought not of a person but of millions of them: the LGBTQ+ community she’s been part of since she came out in her teens. In the dedication of WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS, she wishes marginalized voices within her community, “every light in the sky.”

In that spirit, for the week leading up to the book’s release, Anna-Marie will be taking over @MacmillanLib to share love for her community every day with the hashtag #allourlight (all tweets signed -AMM). Here, she explains more about why:

For the LGBTQ+ community, this year has been both groundbreaking and heartbreaking. I’m a queer Latina married to a transgender guy, and this year I’ve cried with joy for our best moments, and sobbed over our most devastating. I’ve researched what states the Transboy and I can travel to in case he’s not allowed to use public restrooms. And I’ve tried to smile and pretend I have no anxiety whatsoever about releasing WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS. But being a girl of color releasing my first queer book sometimes makes me afraid. And I want to do something with that fear. I want to use it to share love that exists within and for our community.

Every weekday until release day, I’ll be sharing a different message of love for my LGBTQ+ community. Whether it’s yours too or you’re an ally, I hope you’ll join me.

Have love to send the LGBTQ+ community? Share it on Twitter with the hashtag #allourlight.

With love and gratitude from this one little Latina queer,
♥ Anna-Marie McLemore readmoreremove

June is Pride Month

Read out loud & proud with these new LGBTQ titles:

Adult:
WHAT BELONGS TO YOU by Garth Greenwell
HIDE by Matthew Griffin
THE AMERICAN PEOPLE: Volume 1: Search for My Heart by Larry Kramer
THE LESBIAN SEX HAIKU BOOK (WITH CATS!) by Anna Pulley & Kelsey Beyer
EVERY HEART A DOORWAY by Seanan McGuire

YA:
IF I WAS YOUR GIRL by Meredith Russo
SUMMER DAYS AND SUMMER NIGHTS, edited by Stephanie Perkins
YOU KNOW ME WELL by David Levithan & Nina LaCour
CARRY ON by Rainbow Rowell
ABOUT A GIRL by Sarah McCarry

Big congratulations to our 2016 Lammy Award-winning books:

Bisexual Literature
IRREPRESSIBLE: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham by Emily Bingham

Gay Poetry
RECONNAISSANCE by Carl Phillips

Don’t miss our Pride Month e-Book sale happening now!

Pride Month LGBTQ E-Book Sale

June is Pride Month and we’re celebrating with an e-Book sale on select LGBTQ titles!

Running May 30 through July 4, nearly 20 e-Books will be discounted 30% off (with our regular lending terms), including these acclaimed & award-winning titles:

A HOME AT THE END OF THE WORLD by Michael Cunningham
EVERY HEART A DOORWAY by Seanan McGuire
THE TALENTED MISS HIGHSMITH by Joan Schenkar
THE CRUEL EVER AFTER by Ellen Hart
AND THE BAND PLAYED ON by Randy Shilts

Click here to download the spreadsheet of all available titles with exact price changes.

Booklist Top LGBTQ Picks

In light of the recent Supreme Court decision making same-sex marriage the law of the land (YAY!), Booklist announced their top LGBTQ picks, including these noteworthy Macmillan titles:

Top 10 LGBTQ Literature

FRANK: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage by Barney Frank

IRREPRESSIBLE: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham by Emily Bingham

THE REBELLION OF MISS LUCY ANN LOBDELL by William Klaber

Read-alikes: Prominent Lesbian Modernists

ALL WE KNOW: Three Lives by Lisa Cohen

FLAPPERS: Six Women of a Dangerous Generation by Judith Mackrell readmoreremove

2013 Lammy Awards Finalists for LGBT Lit

The Lambda Literary Foundation (LLF) announced this year's finalists for the Lambda Literary Awards (a.k.a. the Lammys)! The 2012 awards mark their twenty-fifth year celebrating achievements in LGBT literature.

We're very proud to see the following titles published and distributed by Macmillan on their shortlist:

Gay Memoir/Biography

FIRE IN THE BELLY by Cynthia Carr

MY HUSBAND AND MY WIVES: A Gay Man’s Odyssey by Charles Rowan Beye

Lesbian Memoir/Biography

ALL WE KNOW: Three Lives by Lisa Cohen

Lesbian Mystery

REST FOR THE WICKED by Ellen Hart

LGBT Debut Fiction

THE EVENING HOUR by Carter Sickels

See the full list of Lammy finalists here.

Winners will be announced on June 3rd, 2013, at The Great Hall at Cooper Union in New York City. Ticket information here.

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At Home in the Stacks: An Interview with Amber Dermont

Earlier this week, I was lucky enough to steal a few minutes with debut author Amber Dermont whose novel, THE STARBOARD SEA, comes out this month! She opened our conversation with a word about what librarians mean to her. 

"I grew up in a library," she said. "My parents are rare book dealers and our house was floor to ceiling bookshelves and first editions. To this day, I still feel most at home lost among the stacks. During high school and college, I worked as a library proctor and apprenticed myself to a series of world-class librarians. These super heroes taught me how to research my stories, check my facts and compile the necessary details that lead me to write my own novel. I am forever in their debt."

And now, on to the interview! 

Ali: I would guess that every debut author takes inspiration from other artists, be they authors, musicians, painters, or, say, typographers. Does anyone stick out as a particularly important part of your process? 

Amber fun photoAmber: Great question! Writers are like magpies thieving for shiny objects, eager for any charm that will help build a better nest. As I began writing THE STARBOARD SEA, I sought inspiration from the painter John Currin and the photographers Tina Barney and Anthony Goicolea. All three of these artists helped me envision the physical and emotional landscapes of the novel: the listless suntanned faces, the splendor of Manhattan penthouses, the caprice of adolescence and the brutal beauty of youth. John Currin often paints society women in sexy, outlandish poses. His portrait of his wife, "Rachel in Fur," served as the muse for my character Brizzey and the redheaded starlet in his masterpiece, "Heartless," helped me bring Diana and Aidan to life. Currin's intimate depiction of two nude sailors, "Fishermen," became a touchstone for Jason's tender and fraught relationship with Cal. 

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