Articles tagged "journalism"

November 2017 Nonfiction

November brings a bounty of excellent new nonfiction to your library’s shelves!

PROMISE ME, DAD: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose by Joe Biden
The vice president pens a deeply moving memoir about the most challenging professional and personal year in which he lost his son to brain cancer. “The book is a backstage drama, honest, raw and rich in detail. People who have lost someone will genuinely take comfort from what he has to say….” — New York Times

PRAIRIE FIRES: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser
A November 2017 LibraryReads pick & New York Times Notable Book of 2017! “The sesquicentennial observance of the birth of the author of the celebrated Little House books (65 million copies sold in 45 languages) has been the catalyst for the publication of a spate of books, now including this magisterial biography, which surely must be called definitive. Richly documented…. But it is its marriage of biography and history—the latter providing such a rich context for the life—that is one of the great strengths of this indispensable book, an unforgettable American story.” — Booklist, starred review

THE WINE LOVER’S DAUGHTER: A Memoir by Anne Fadiman
A Library Journal Best Book of 2017 and a November 2017 Indie Next pick! With all her characteristic wit and feeling, celebrated essayist Fadiman examines her relationship with her father, Clifton Fadiman, a renowned literary critic, editor, and radio host whose greatest love was wine. “In this crisp, scintillating, amusing, and affecting memoir, Anne incisively and lovingly portrays her brilliant and vital father and brings into fresh focus the dynamic world of twentieth-century books and America’s discovery of wine.” — Booklist, starred review

THE VANITY FAIR DIARIES by Tina Brown
Also available in audio
Tina Brown kept delicious daily diaries throughout her eight spectacular years as editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair. Today they provide an incendiary portrait of the flash and dash and power brokering of the Excessive Eighties in New York and Hollywood. “High and low, perceptive and prescient (in 1987, she speculated that the American public won’t be able to resist the crassness of Donald Trump), this is a wildly entertaining, essential look at print journalism before the fall.” — Booklist, starred & signature review

SECRECY WORLD: Inside the Panama Papers Investigation of Illicit Money Networks and the Global Elite by Jake Bernstein
“Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Bernstein, a reporter with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, recounts the story that the millions of documents leaked from a Panamanian law firm tell about how corporations and wealthy individuals hide their money in offshore accounts. …Bernstein does first-rate work in providing a map to a scandal that has yet to unfold completely.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

Stars & TV News for I WAS TOLD TO COME ALONE

Washington Post reporter Souad Mekhennet is a German-born Muslim of Moroccan and Turkish descent, and she uses the balance between the Muslim and Western sides of her life to provide a mediating voice between these cultures, which too often misunderstand each other.

Souad’s memoir, I WAS TOLD TO COME ALONE: My Journey Behind the Lines of Jihad is being developed into a TV Drama and has THREE starred reviews:

“A riveting memoir and a literary bombshell that effectively eviscerates every preconception, misconception, and prejudice readers have about the Arab world, I WAS TOLD TO COME ALONE reinforces the singular significance of journalism, especially foreign journalism, at a time when it is facing its greatest challenges. Compelling, insightful, and shockingly relevant, Mekhennet’s chronicle is a must-read and nothing less than a revelation.” — Booklist, starred review

Washington Post correspondent Mekhennet offers a spellbinding fusion of history, memoir, and reportage in this enthralling account of her personal experience as a journalist and a Muslim on assignment in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa. The value of this work lies in Mekhennet’s commitment to ‘not taking any side, but speaking to all sides and challenging them.’”Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The thrilling narrative brings up critical, persuasive insights while trying to answer the questions of where terrorism comes from and why it’s so difficult to eradicate. For readers who are interested in modern politics, the Middle East, journalism, or strong female voices.” — Library Journal, starred review readmoreremove

The Giant 2016 Graphic Novel Roundup!

The saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words” and that’s certainly true of graphic novels. Thanks to comic book characters dominating pop culture, the format has been enjoying a boom and readers are coming to the medium in droves.

Publishers Weekly recently profiled graphic novel publisher Papercutz, which publishes between 50 and 60 books per year, mostly aimed at children ages 8–12. Their Super Genius imprint publishes books for teen readers and a new imprint called Charmz, aimed at pre-teen & early teen girls, will launch in May 2017.

Papercutz’s catalog includes bestselling licensed media properties, such as Barbie, Dennis the Menace, the Smurfs, Lego’s Ninjago and Bionicle series (though Lego moved the licenses to Little, Brown last year), a line of classic Disney graphic novels (DANTE’S INFERNO becomes MICKEY’S INFERNO, and X-MICKEY features X-Files-type supernatural escapades), as well as graphic novels based on a first-look deal with children’s TV network Nickelodeon.

Papercutz also rebooted select classics (WUTHERING HEIGHTS, THE JUNGLE, and THE INVISIBLE MAN to name a few) with artwork from acclaimed contemporary artists such as Rick Geary, Peter Kuper, and Gahan Wilson. Their first list in 2005 featured a manga-style graphic novel revival of the classic Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys adventure series, which are still in print and have together sold more than 800,000 copies.

Foreign imports are big, including France’s popular Ariol series by Emmanuel Guibert and Guillaume Bianco, and Antonello Dalena’s Ernest and Rebecca series. Italy’s bestselling prose series starring a time-traveling squirrel named Geronimo Stilton has done so well in the U.S. that Italy ran out of books and now Papercutz creates them.

Original graphic novels were an organic movement from the Geronimo Stilton books and Papercutz’s first original title was Deb Lucke’s THE LUNCH WITCH, followed by THE RED SHOES AND OTHER STORIES by Sandra Marrs and John Chalmers who create comics under the name Metaphrog. This November the house is publishing TRISH TRASH: Rollergirl of Mars, a YA SF graphic novel offering diversity—the book has a multiracial heroine—that was originally published in France but created by noted American cartoonist Jessica Abel.

The initial Charmz line (S’17) will simultaneously release the first four graphic novels in a planned series:
* CHLOE by Greg Tessier and Amandine, the story of a girl who is navigating life at a new school
* STITCHED by Mariah Huehner and Aaron Alexovich, a supernatural tale about a rag-doll girl who wakes up in a cemetery and must figure out who she is
* SWEETIES, based on Cathy Cassidy’s Chocolate Box Girls novels and adapted by Veronique Grisseaux and Anna Merli, about a girl who acquires four half-sisters when her father remarries
* THE GREAT COSMIC RACE by Amy Chu and Agnes Garbowska, a SF adventure story featuring an interstellar scavenger hunt, a smart girl, and an alien shapeshifter

Meanwhile, Library Journal offered their Graphic Novels Preview 2016 and noted many trends, starting with…
FEMALE CREATORS

Women writers and artists have historically been under­represented in graphic novels, but that seems poised to change based on the number of high-profile titles set for release in the coming year, ranging from humor to journalism to memoir and beyond. Among the most highly anticipated is Lynda Barry’s THE GREATEST OF MARLYS (Drawn & Quarterly, Aug.), a collection concentrating on one of best-selling Barry’s most beloved characters, eight-year-old Marlys. Through Marlys, Barry delves into the highs and lows of childhood and adolescence, capturing in unflinching detail the amusement and the horror of coming of age.

Lisa Hanawalt, perhaps best known as the designer behind the distinctive look of the animated Netflix series BoJack Horseman, moves fluidly between wit and pathos in HOT DOG TASTE TEST (Drawn & Quarterly, Jun.). While Hanawalt explores (and explodes) foodie culture in this new book, she also investigates relationships, identity issues, and more, all delivered in beautiful watercolors and an original and immensely funny voice.

Slightly less provocative but no less interesting an exploration of one artist’s quest for self-expression is Lucy Knisley’s memoir SOMETHING NEW: Tales from a Makeshift Bride (First Second, May), which details Knisley’s ventures in putting her own stamp on every facet of her wedding, from sewing her own dress to building the very barn in which the ceremony was held.

JOURNALISM AND NONFICTION

Riad Sattouf’s THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE, VOL. 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984–1985 (Holt, Sept.), the sequel to THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1978–1984, continues the author’s experiences moving among France, Libya, and Syria as a child. The second book finds the Sattoufs settled in Syria and struggling against obstacles both local and political.

Also exploring the Middle East, specifically the legacy of the Iraq War, is Sarah Glidden’s ROLLING BLACKOUTS (Drawn & Quarterly, Oct.), in which the author describes her travels as a journalist in Turkey, Iraq, and Syria.

FROM ABROAD

Graphic novels in translation continue to be massively popular, especially those originally published in Japanese. While the late Shigeru Mizuki is not the legend that [Osamu] Tezuka is, he is an important figure in his own right, and fans should be excited about Drawn & Quarterly’s THE BIRTH OF KITARO (May), the first of six volumes that will bring the Kitaro character to the United States for the first time. readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Starred Nonfiction

Kick off the weekend with these multi-starred nonfiction books!

CONSEQUENCE by Eric Fair
A B&N Winter 2016 Discover Great New Writers pick! “In this harrowing memoir, Fair, an interrogator at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, expands on his 2007 Washington Post editorial, in which he countered the claim that detainee abuse was a rare, isolated phenomenon. Fair is a gifted writer, and his capacity for self-examination makes this work both deeply insightful and moving. ” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

A startling debut from a haunted individual who wishes he had left Iraq earlier ‘with my soul intact.’” Kirkus Reviews, starred review

THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS: Artists and the Last Age of the Exotic
by Jamie James

A PW Best Summer Books of 2016 pick with THREE starred reviews! “In this exciting book, novelist and critic James examines six artists (and many interesting secondary figures) whose travels allowed them to find inspiration and belonging far from their homelands in locations across the globe. [THE GLAMOUR OF STRANGENESS] is a sharp, thought-provoking contribution to the ongoing conversation about transculturation.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

[A] richly detailed, absorbing cultural history… Abundant primary sources inform James’ sharply drawn, sympathetic portraits.” Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“James is merrily entertaining in his exceptional erudition and nimble eloquence, and fluently and movingly insightful in his psychological, sexual, social, and aesthetic interpretations as he tells these astonishing, often tragic tales of intrepid self-creation and ardently chosen homelands.”Booklist, starred review

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