Articles tagged "Joni Mitchell"

New York Times Summer Reading Recommendations

The gray lady recently revealed several Summer 2017 reading lists in mystery, horror, graphic novels, and more, including these 10 Macmillan titles:
True Crime (full list)

In his lively literary biography ARTHUR AND SHERLOCK: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes, Michael Sims traces the real-life inspiration for the first “scientific detective” to the renowned Dr. Joseph Bell, a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh celebrated for his uncanny diagnostic observational skills. His methods were “quite easy, gentlemen,” Dr. Bell would assure his students. “If you will only observe and put two and two together,” you, too, could deduce a man’s profession, family history and social status from the way he buttons his waistcoat.

Grace Humiston was an advocate for an earlier generation of lost and forgotten women, and her inspiring story demands a hearing. In MRS. SHERLOCK HOLMES: The True Story of New York City’s Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case That Captivated a Nation, Brad Ricca makes a heroic case for Humiston, a lawyer and United States district attorney who forged a career of defending powerless women and immigrants. For her dogged work on the 1917 case of a missing girl that the police had given up on, the newspapers called her “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.”

Authors of true crime books have made a cottage industry out of analyzing what makes killers tick. Michael Cannell gives credit where credit is due in INCENDIARY: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling by profiling one of the pioneers, Dr. James A. Brussel, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in the criminal mind. After 28 attacks, Dr. Brussel, a Freudian psychiatrist who ministered to patients at Creedmoor state mental hospital, used “reverse psychology,” a precursor of criminal profiling, to identify features of the bomber — his “sexuality, race, appearance, work history and personality type.” Aside from an unseemly fight over the $26,000 reward money, the case was a genuine groundbreaker in criminal forensics.

Horror (full list)

Some horror novels, though, feel timeless whenever you happen to read them, and Kit Reed’s wondrous new ghost story MORMAMA seems to me one of those. It’s a haunted-house tale, set in Jacksonville, Fla., in which three elderly sisters, a young single mother, her 12-year-old son and an amnesiac drifter who might be related to them all, attempt to fend off the uneasy spirits also resident in the crumbling mansion they live in. Reed, who has been writing fiction of all kinds for nearly 60 years, certainly knows how to construct a traditional spooky tale, and she does that expertly in MORMAMA, alternating different voices (some living, some not), laying out complex family relationships over several generations, managing a complicated plot and then drawing everything together in a spectacular, and unexpectedly moving, conclusion.

Graphic Novels (full list)

Most of Guy Delisle’s longer graphic novels to date, like PYONGYANG and BURMA CHRONICLES, have been memoirs of his travels. HOSTAGE is neither about the Canadian cartoonist’s own experiences nor grounded in his canny observations of place: It’s the story of Christophe André, who spent almost four months in 1997 as a hostage. Kidnapped from a Doctors Without Borders office in Nazran, Ingushetia, a Russian republic near Chechnya, where he was an administrator, he was taken to Grozny and handcuffed to a radiator next to a mattress in a darkened room. That was all André knew. He didn’t speak his captors’ language, got almost no information of any kind from them, and had no way of knowing when or how he might be freed.

It’s usually a slight to argue that an artist “hasn’t found their voice yet”; in the case of the restlessly versatile Jillian Tamaki, it’s an endorsement. BOUNDLESS collects short stories that are so far apart from one another in tone and technique that they could almost pass for the work of entirely different artists. If Tamaki (the illustrator of the Book Review’s By the Book feature) has a favorite storytelling strategy, it seems to be dreaming up some kind of odd artifact of mass culture and then examining the way people react to it. readmoreremove

For Your Consideration: October 2017 LibraryReads Titles

Download, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the October 2017* LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due August 20! Click here for the full list of 2017 deadlines.

FRESH COMPLAINT by Jeffrey Eugenides
“Pulitzer Prize winner Eugenides, whose novels have also been runners-up for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and France’s Prix Médicis, now comes up with a first collection of stories. Not surprisingly, the stories deal with identity crisis, sexual confusion, and adolescent angst, as when a poet who feels left out of the financial boom becomes an embezzler, a musician loses his dreams to the responsibilities of family, and a college freshman has an encounter on a train that redirects his future.” Library Journal, pre-pub alert

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

13 MINUTES by Sarah Pinborough
I was dead for 13 minutes. Now I want to know why. In LibraryReads author Pinborough’s twisty YA suspense novel, Natasha doesn’t remember how she ended up in the icy water that night, but she does know this—that it wasn’t an accident, and that she wasn’t suicidal.

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss

HOW THE FINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS by Donna Andrews
“Andrews’s laugh-inducing, multi-award-winning, New York Times best-selling mysteries feature a passel of Christmas treats, e.g., SIX GEESE A-SLAYING, and here’s another. Meg’s husband is turning his one-man show of Dickens’s A Christmas Carol into a big, splashy production, with a famed if fading actor brought in to play Scrooge. Alas, the man has enemies.” Library Journal, pre-pub alert

To request an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “How the Finch Stole Christmas.”*

THE TROUBLE WITH TWELFTH GRAVE by Darynda Jones
“It’s bad enough that Grim Reaper Charley Davidson is busy protecting a newbie PI venture, handling the Vatican’s inquiries about her daughter, and covering up a murder. But now her beloved but now unrecognizable Reyes, the Son of Satan, is determined to destroy the world, and when someone starts attacking humans attuned to the supernatural world, Charley can’t help but suspect him. And you thought you were having a hard day. Twelfth (obviously) in the New York Times and USA Today best-selling series.” — Library Journal, pre-pub alert

To request an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “12th Grave.”*

THE STOLEN MARRIAGE by Diane Chamberlain
“Following PRETENDING TO DANCE, New York Times best-selling author Chamberlain waltzes us down to early 1940s Hickory, NC, where Tess finds herself stuck in an airless marriage to cool, distant Henry after impulsively breaking off her engagement to her longtime love. She finds purpose by working at the newly built polio hospital but knows that townsfolk regard her with suspicion and starts sensing that her life might be danger.” Library Journal, pre-pub alert

Download the e-galley from Edelweiss
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PW’s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017

These ten Macmillan titles are some of Publishers Weekly‘s Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017:

Fiction
BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
In a future strewn with the cast-off experiments of an industrial laboratory known only as the Company, a scavenger named Rachel survives alongside her lover, Wick, a dealer of memory-altering beetles with whom she takes shelter from the periodic ravages of a giant mutant bear named Mord. One day, caught in Mord’s fur, Rachel finds the bizarre, shape-shifting creature “like a hybrid of sea anemone and squid” she calls Borne.

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror
AMBERLOUGH by Lara Elena Donnelly
Donnelly’s debut, a fast-moving tale of desperate love and intrigue in a created world that recalls Europe on the brink of WWII, is emotionally wrenching and shockingly timely.

Poetry
AFTERLAND by Mai Der Vang
Vang, the 2016 Walt Whitman Award winner, tells the story of Hmong diaspora forced out of Laos and into exile as a result of the U.S.’s secret war. Vang’s unflinching poems address the status of refugees, including her family, and Hmong resilience in exile.

Comics/Graphic Novels
BOUNDLESS by Jillian Tamaki
Tamaki’s last two books—THIS ONE SUMMER and SUPER MUTANT MAGIC ACADEMY—showed she is one of the world’s best cartoonists, and this collection of her evocative short stories will just cement her reputation.

Memoir
THIS CLOSE TO HAPPY: A Reckoning with Depression by Daphne Merkin
A personal account of a life afflicted with depression, from an affluent but neglected childhood to the present day.

Literary Essays/Criticism/Biographies
THE NOVEL OF THE CENTURY: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables by David Bellos
Bellos, a translator of French literature, proves that the story of how Victor Hugo’s classic novel came to life is a complex and engrossing epic all its own.

Politics/Current Events
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.
Former public defender Forman offers a complex look at the part played by African-Americans in shaping criminal justice policy.

Music
RECKLESS DAUGHTER: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell by David Yaffe
A biography, with dozens of in-person interviews with Mitchell, reveals the backstory behind the famous songs—from her youth on the Canadian prairie, the child she gave up for adoption, through her albums and love affairs, to the present. readmoreremove

Books for Dads & Dudes

Father’s Day is coming up this weekend! Here are some books for the dads (and dudes) in your life:

RAISING MEN: Lessons Navy SEALs Learned from Their Training and Taught to Their Sons by Eric Davis
Using a unique blend of discipline, leadership, adventure, and grace, Eric and his SEAL brothers share lessons about how to connect, and reconnect, with sons and teach readers how to raise real men—the Navy SEAL way.

BILL O’REILLY’S LEGENDS & LIES: THE PATRIOTS by David Fisher
The must-have companion to Bill O’Reilly’s historical docudrama Legends and Lies: The Patriots! Heavily illustrated with spectacular artwork that brings this important history to vivid life, THE PATRIOTS is an exciting and eye-opening look at the Revolutionary War through the lives of its leaders.

SOCCER WITHOUT BORDERS: Jürgen Klinsmann, Coaching the U.S. Men’s National Soccer Team and the Quest for the World Cup by Erik Kirschbaum, with a foreword by Jürgen Klinsmann
Controversial U.S men’s soccer coach Jürgen Klinsmann reveals his thoughts on building a winning soccer team. “Kirschbaum examines how a shy German striker cobbled together his experiences as a player in four different countries to create a personal coaching philosophy. This work will be appreciated by soccer fans, especially with the United States hosting the Copa América Centenario in 2016.” — Library Journal

THE ONLY RULE IS IT HAS TO WORK: Our Wild Experiment Building a New Kind of Baseball Team by Ben Lindbergh & Sam Miller
What would happen if two statistics-minded outsiders were allowed to run a professional baseball team? That’s what Lindbergh and Miller got to do when the Sonoma Stompers, an independent minor-league team in California, offered them the chance to run the team’s baseball operations according to the most advanced statistics. “For fantasy baseball junkies and baseball purists alike, this is a vivid, joyful exploration of recruiting and running a team by numbers—and instinct.”
Publishers Weekly

NEVER A DULL MOMENT: 1971 The Year That Rock Exploded by David Hepworth
A rollicking look at 1971—the busiest, most innovative and resonant year of the 70s, defined by the musical arrival of such stars as David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, and Joni Mitchell. “An exuberant tour through a pivotal year in the development of popular music and culture.” — Kirkus Reviews
Check out more music books here.

Friday Reads: Music Books

music booksRock out with these books about music:

UPROOT: Travels in 21st-Century Music and Digital Culture by Jace Clayton
The writer and artist DJ/rupture guides this world tour of music and technology in an age of radical freedom and interconnectivity. “In this exhilarating book, Clayton, aka DJ Rupture, guides readers on an international tour of various forms of music and music-making technologies within many cultures. Clayton urges readers to embrace the power of music, recognizing its energetic and enduring capacity to capture and express shared emotions and to become a ‘memory palace with room for everybody inside.’” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

NEVER A DULL MOMENT: 1971 The Year That Rock Exploded by David Hepworth
A rollicking look at 1971—the busiest, most innovative and resonant year of the 70s, defined by the musical arrival of such stars as David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, and Joni Mitchell. “An exuberant tour through a pivotal year in the development of popular music and culture.” — Kirkus Reviews

SCREAMIN’ JAY HAWKINS’ ALL-TIME GREATEST HITS by Mark Binelli
Rolling Stone writer Binelli turns his sharp, forceful prose to fiction, in an inventive retelling of the outrageous life of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, a bluesman with one hit and a string of inflammatory guises. “This dreamlike album of real and imagined scenes from a complex artist’s memory bank is as flamboyant a display of light and shadow as one of Hawkins’ stage shows.” — Kirkus Reviews

A STRAY CAT STRUTS: My Life as a Rockabilly Rebel by Slim Jim Phantom
The first-ever memoir by a member of the Stray Cats, featuring stories of a rock ‘n roll life, friendships with icons like George Harrison and Keith Richards, and marriage to Britt Ekland. “An entertaining pop music memoir for fans of drummers, Eighties music, and/or rockabilly.” — Library Journal

EVERY SONG EVER: Twenty Ways to Listen in an Age of Musical Plenty by Ben Ratliff
Veteran New York Times music critic Ratliff reimagines the very idea of music appreciation for our times. “A remarkable new book… [Ratliff] goes leaping from Beethoven to Big Black, from Morton Feldman to Curtis Mayfield, identifying continuities while delighting in contrasts.” — The New Yorker

WAKING THE SPIRIT: A Musician’s Journey Healing Body, Mind, and Soul by Andrew Schulman
“A professional guitarist whose venues have ranged from Carnegie Hall to the Improv Comedy Club, Schulman was pulled back from death in July 2009 by a medical miracle and decided it was give-back time. He’s now the resident musician in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit at New York’s Mount Sinai Beth Israel hospital in New York, where he brings music—and hence joy and healing—to critically ill patients.” Library Journal, pre-pub alert

PRINCE: Inside the Music and the Masks by Ronin Ro
A fascinating, authoritative biography, with a new introduction and chapter covering the past five years and Prince’s death.

THE SPEED OF SOUND: Breaking the Barriers Between Music and Technology: A Memoir by Thomas Dolby
A remarkable memoir from Thomas Dolby, who rose to international fame with such hit songs as “She Blinded Me with Science” and “Hyperactive!” in the early 80’s and found a second act as a tech pioneer. readmoreremove

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