Articles tagged "jewish"

In the Hot Seat: Matt Goldman on GONE TO DUST

Today we turn the spotlight on Matt Goldman, whose debut novel, GONE TO DUST, features an unusual crime—a murdered woman is found covered in dust from hundreds of vacuum cleaner bags, rendering DNA evidence useless.

Library Journal‘s Books for Dudes column called it, “hard-boiled awesomeness” and Booklist said, “Offer this one to aficionados of chilly Scandinavian noir and the new generation of Philip Marlowe fans.”

Macmillan Library: Hi Matt, and thanks for joining us for a Q&A on the blog today! Before we talk about your debut mystery, GONE TO DUST, let’s start with your credentials. You began your career as a stand-up comedian and are now a playwright and Emmy Award-winning television writer for Seinfeld, Ellen, and other shows. You must do so much writing for your day job, why write a novel?

Matt Goldman: I love writing and I’m a first-degree introvert. So much of television writing is done in a roomful of writers. Not the actual script writing (usually), but conceiving characters and stories. Much of the rewriting is also done in a group. Especially in comedy. TV writing and writers have taught me so much about character, story, pace, dialogue, and series construction, I wouldn’t trade a minute of it. But for my personality, it’s exhausting trying to track all those words in the air. I love the process of book writing—I find it energizing. And it’s a chance to write my voice without concern for other writers, actors, studios, and networks.

ML: Was it harder or easier for you to write GONE TO DUST vs writing for TV? What are some of the major differences?

MG: Some of the differences I explained above. I guess I don’t look at it as hard vs. easy. They have their tradeoffs by that measurement. It’s a more whole and rewarding experience for me to write books. I’m a serial daydreamer. That serves me better as a novelist than it does in a room where I’m supposed to be paying attention.

ML: Did you have specific inspirations as you wrote GONE TO DUST? It’s lighthearted, but has a very noir feel.

MG: I started reading the mystery/crime genre relatively recently. When I read Raymond Chandler, I saw how my voice could work in telling those kinds of stories. Chandler’s voice and style are different from mine, and his skill far outweighs mine, but he did inspire me to sit down and give it a shot. readmoreremove

LJ’s Jewish Book Month Picks

Library Journal recently featured a roundup of titles perfect for Jewish Book Month (November 24–December 24), including these five Macmillan titles:

GAME OF QUEENS: A Novel of Vashti and Esther by India Edghill
Reference librarian Edghill reimagines the life of Vashti, one of the most beautiful women in the Persian empire, who lost her crown when she defied her husband, King Ahasuerus. Vashti was also instrumental in choosing her successor, Esther.

THE SECRET BOOK OF KINGS by Yochi Brandes
Filled with intrigue, romance, and rebellion, this biblical epic recounts the story of Michal, daughter of King Saul and discarded wife of King David. Brandes, a biblical scholar, is a best-selling and award-winning Israeli novelist and essayist. This is her first book to be translated into English.

THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF JERUSALEM by Sarit Yishai-Levi
This international best seller and Israeli award winner presents a sweeping family saga that follows four generations of Ladino-speaking Sephardic women in Jerusalem who all fear that the family curse—that the husbands don’t love their wives—will continue with future descendants. This novel is currently being adapted into a feature film in Israel.

THE DEBT OF TAMAR by Nicole Dweck
A rare self-publishing success, Dweck’s debut won the Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Award in 2013. The novel’s first half chronicles a Jewish family’s flight from Iberia during the 16th-­century Inquisition to Istanbul. The second part is set in 2002, when a young man descended from the Ottoman sultans meets the daughter of a Holocaust survivor. Of course, the reader knows that these separate story lines will intersect, but the result is a compelling and enjoyable read. readmoreremove

We ♥ Sarah Glidden’s Graphic Novels

Sarah Glidden is many things: a progressive Jewish American twentysomething who is both vocal about and critical of Israeli politics in the Holy Land, a graduate of Boston University, and the author of an award-winning graphic memoir.

That book, HOW TO UNDERSTAND ISRAEL IN 60 DAYS OR LESS, which was a 2012 YALSA Great Graphic Novels for Teens selection, is available now in trade paperback. Glidden used time during her Birthright Israel tour to ask people about the fraught and complex issue of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, only to come to terms with the idea that there are no easy answers to the world’s problems.

Her second highly anticipated graphic novel, ROLLING BLACKOUTS: Dispatches from Turkey, Syria, and Iraq, details her two-month long journey through Turkey, Iraq, and Syria as she accompanies two reporters while they research stories on the Iraq War’s effect on the Middle East and, specifically, the war’s refugees. “Glidden’s understated, face-focused illustration style gets under your skin—by removing her own personality from the writing, the author sucks readers in so deeply that you really feel present, seeing her journey through her eyes.” — Library Journal, starred review
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Double Debut: Both Starred!

Do your patrons have a craving for historical mysteries? Great, because two fantastic debuts are heading their way.

The Holy Thief: In Soviet Russia, an investigator must scramble to find the murderer of an American girl. One wrong step means exile in Siberia.

"Ryan re-creates the toxic, terrorized atmosphere by plunging Korolev into a
ghastly web where nothing is what it seems" --Library Journal (starred review)

The Sleepwalkers: When a Jewish detective must investigate a string of heinous crimes during the dawn of Nazi Germany, the hunter becomes the hunted.

"Grossman
powerfully captures the atmosphere of Berlin on the verge of Nazi takeover, the
elegance and cultural brilliance amid the decadence, and the sense of impending
doom." --Library Journal (starred review)

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