Articles tagged "japan"

Pearl Harbor 75 Years Later

Thriller Thursday (11/10/16 Edition)

We’re seeing stars for today’s #ThrillerThursday picks!

UNDER THE MIDNIGHT SUN by Keigo Higashino
Two starred reviews! From acclaimed international bestseller and LibraryReads author Higashino comes a compelling story of a twenty-year-old murder, two teenagers linked by the crime, and a detective’s obsession to finally uncover the truth. “Edgar-nominated Higashino revisits the dangerous codependence of bonds forged in murder with this complex, elegant psychological thriller. A starkly rendered portrayal of modern Japanese culture that will draw fans of fellow Japanese thriller master Natsuo Kirino’s novels and the haunting Scandinavian tales of Karin Fossum.” — Booklist, starred review

BRONX REQUIEM by John Clarkson
James Beck and his crew return—when one of their own is killed almost immediately after he’s released from prison, Beck is determined to learn the truth and supply his own brand of justice. “Beck is much like Lee Child’s Jack Reacher in his skill set but unlike Reacher in working with a close-knit circle. A must for fans of gritty crime fiction.” — Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

Happy #BookBday (9/27/16 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to three whimsical, mythical reads:

DON’T I KNOW YOU? by Marni Jackson
This debut “whimsical collection of linked stories” (Kirkus Reviews) follows one woman’s life from age 16 to 60, and what happens when certain celebrities—Neil Young, Meryl Streep, John Updike, Taylor Swift, Karl Ove Knausgaard—start turning up in her private life, at the spa, in the middle of a break-up, even on the operating table.

THE TENGU’S GAME OF GO by Lian Hearn (Book 4 in the Tale of Shikanoko)
The fourth and final book in an epic, action-packed four-volume adventure in mythical, medieval Japan, where the drama plays out against a background of wild forests, elegant castles, hidden temples, and savage battlefields. “Expect graphic violence, fairy-tale magic, flights of comedy, and operatic melodrama but also genuine intimacy and tragedy.” — Kirkus Reviews readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Food & Culture

TGIF, friends! Our #FridayReads picks are two unique explorations of food and culture:

SUPER SUSHI RAMEN EXPRESS: One Family’s Journey Through the Belly of Japan by Michael Booth
From the author of THE ALMOST NEARLY PERFECT PEOPLE comes a fascinating and funny culinary journey through Japan. “There’s some of both Bill Bryson and Anthony Bourdain in Booth’s cheerful, game, often irreverent, and, perhaps most importantly, hungry approach to discovering a new place. … food is really only the foreground—albeit a wildly eye-catching, engaging one—of Booth’s portrait of a place he so clearly finds splendid.” — Booklist

KNIVES & INK: Chefs and the Stories Behind Their Tattoos (with Recipes) by Isaac Fitzgerald & Wendy MacNaughton
From the authors of PEN & INK—bestselling illustrator Wendy MacNaughton and BuzzFeed books editor Isaac Fitzgerald—the stories behind the tattoos chefs proudly wear, with signature recipes. “The best entries in this collection are about tattoos that show the passion and dedication each person brings to their craft in the kitchen. Readers are sure to devour this in a single sitting.” — Publishers Weekly

Share your #FridayReads with us @MacmillanLib. Happy weekend!

For Your Consideration: November 2016 LibraryReads Titles

Nov16LRcollageDownload, read, and nominate your favorite titles for the November 2016* LibraryReads list!

*Nominations are due September 20! Click here for the full list of 2016 deadlines.

TO CAPTURE WHAT WE CANNOT KEEP by Beatrice Colin
Set against the construction of the Eiffel Tower, this novel charts the relationship between a young widow and an engineer who, despite constraints of class and wealth, fall in love. “Hauntingly melancholic in places, Colin’s story moves like wisps of fog through Parisian streets, capturing moments of both gaiety and tragedy. This exquisitely written, shadowy historical novel will appeal to a wide variety of readers, including fans of the Belle Époque.” — Library Journal, starred review

NetGalleyLogoAvailable on NetGalley. To be pre-approved for an e-galley, please email library@macmillanusa.com with the subject “To Capture What We Cannot Keep.”*

THIS HOUSE IS MINE by Dörte Hansen
A bestseller in Germany, Hansen’s debut novel is about two strong-willed and very different women who have a connection around a special old house: Vera, a refugee who arrived from East Prussia in 1945, and her niece Anne, who shows up at the house 60 years later with her small son. “Hansen makes this story about the process of healing affecting, real, and memorable.” — Publishers Weekly

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NORMAL by Warren Ellis
In this provocative near-future techno-thriller, a foresight strategist (a.k.a.: people who think about geoengineering and smart cities and ways to evade Our Coming Doom) arrives at Normal Head in the wilds of Oregon to unplug and recover, when a patient goes missing from his locked bedroom, leaving nothing but a pile of insects in his wake. “A crackling, funny, and frightening horror story from a unique voice in genre lit.” — Kirkus Reviews

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THE INHERITANCE by Charles Finch
“In the 10th installment of this Victorian-era series, a Member of Parliament–turned–private detective gets the chance to solve a 30-year-old mystery that involves his boyhood friend. Finch impressively raises the stakes of this tale between tea settings, and his character development is top-notch.” — Kirkus Reviews

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UNDER THE MIDNIGHT SUN by Keigo Higashino
Two starred reviews! From acclaimed international bestseller and LibraryReads author Higashino comes a compelling story of a twenty-year-old murder, two teenagers linked by the crime, and a detective’s obsession to finally uncover the truth. “Edgar-nominated Higashino revisits the dangerous codependence of bonds forged in murder with this complex, elegant psychological thriller. A starkly rendered portrayal of modern Japanese culture that will draw fans of fellow Japanese thriller master Natsuo Kirino’s novels and the haunting Scandinavian tales of Karin Fossum.” — Booklist, starred review

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Thriller Thursday (7/17/14 Edition)

Today’s #ThrillerThursday roundup has something for every mystery reader, whether you like cozies, police procedurals, or historical mysteries:

THE BONE ORCHARD by Paul Doiron
In Doiron’s “excellent fifth series installment” (Publishers Weekly, starred review), Mike Bowditch retired from his Maine Game Warden position, but is drawn back in when his mentor Sgt. Kathy Frost is shot. “THE BONE ORCHARD [is] both a rich exploration of character and a satisfying mystery story.” Associated Press

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE EMUS by Donna Andrews
In bestseller Andrews’s 17th(!) side-splitting Meg Langslow mystery, Meg must help her long-lost grandfather find her grandmother Cordelia—who may have been murdered. “Andrews’s readers, who have come to expect a little silliness, fun-loving characters, and endings that are tough to predict won’t be disappointed.” — Publishers Weekly

EVERYONE LIES by A.D. Garrett
Under the Garrett pseudonym, crime writer Margaret Murphy and forensic scientist Dave Barclay take an unflinching look at two people rebuilding their lives, and at the underworld of Manchester, England, in this outstanding collaborative debut, which balances the intricacies of forensics with the cerebral instincts of crime investigation. The brisk plot never strays with its complex exploration of prostitutes and crime lords and its affecting look at Kate and Nick’s complicated relationship.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

BLADE OF THE SAMURAI by Susan Spann
Set amidst the backdrop of feudal 16th Century Japan, a ninja detective and his Jesuit priest sidekick investigate a murder and a plan to assassinate the Shogun. “After her exciting historical mystery debut, CLAWS OF THE CAT, Spann proves she has the touch in her sophomore entry. The deceptively simple prose educates readers about 16th-century Japan, while the well-plotted story moves at ninja speed. The endearing characters fight to defend honor and truth, giving this strong YA appeal.” — Library Journal

What are you reading this #ThrillerThursday? Share your picks with us @MacmillanLib.

Debut of the Month: Claws of the Cat

Fans of historical and international Mysteries, take note! Susan Spann's CLAWS OF THE CAT is a kick butt debut featuring a ninja detective navigating the political and social perils of sixteenth-century Japan and it's Library Journal's Debut of the Month!

When a samurai is brutally murdered in a Kyoto teahouse, master ninja Hiro has no desire to get involved. But the beautiful entertainer accused of the crime enlists the help of Father Mateo, the Portuguese Jesuit priest who Hiro is sworn to protect, leaving the master shinobi with just three days to find the killer and save the girl and the priest from the dead man’s vengeful son. 

"While Spann demonstrates admirable attention to detail in her ninja detective debut, it’s the contemporary tone of her prose that makes this intriguing 16th-century historical so accessible. Laura Joh Rowland fans will like this book for the time period, but the 'buddy tone' is reminiscent of Ian Morson’s 'Nick Zuliani' series and Gary Corby’s 'Athenian Mysteries' series." —Library Journal (starred review, Debut of the Month)

"Spann's debut provides an absorbing look at Japanese culture along with a sharp mystery." —Kirkus Reviews

"[S]et in a mostly untapped period of Japanese history, the book should do well with fans of [Laura Joh Rowland and I. J. Parker]." —Booklist

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