Articles tagged "Jane Austen"

2017 Holiday Giveaway

The holidays are here! Books make great gifts and while we know you’re all professional recommenders, the book suggestions in our Holiday Gift Guide may be helpful to you.

In the spirit of the season, we’re giving away big bundles of these holiday books to THREE lucky librarians!

To enter the giveaway, simply email Library@MacmillanUSA.com from your professional/library-issued e-mail address (subject: 2017 Holiday Giveaway) by Sunday, December 10, and make sure to include your library’s mailing address. Read on for the fine print.

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE AND MISTLETOE by Melissa de la Cruz
New York Times bestselling author Melissa de la Cruz reinvents a classic tale in this gender-swapped version of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice with a holiday twist. “De la Cruz’s Christmas romance is quick, witty, and a must for fans of Austen retellings.” — Publishers Weekly

MR. DICKENS AND HIS CAROL by Samantha Silva
A November 2017 Indie Next pick! Shakespeare in Love meets A Christmas Carol in this debut novel set as Charles Dickens writes his beloved classic. “With the wit and sprightly tone of a classic storyteller, Silva presents a heartwarming tale of friendship and renewal that’s imbued with the true Christmas spirit.” — Booklist

CHRISTMAS IN LONDON by Anita Hughes
A charming, glamourous love story set at Claridge’s in London during the magical week before Christmas starring a sweet NYC baker and the Cooking Channel Producer who could change her life. “Hughes has romance readers’ mouths watering and hearts melting with this food- and holiday-themed novel.” — Booklist

HOPE AT CHRISTMAS by Nancy Naigle
Reeling from divorce, Sydney moves back to her hometown with her daughter, but doesn’t expect to fall for Santa (single dad and local high school history teacher Kevin). “Naigle’s wonderfully heart-warming holiday story will appeal to romance and women’s fiction readers.” — Library Journal readmoreremove

Nonfiction on the Shelves (07/12/17)

Mothers + daughters, a celebrated writer’s home-life, female aviators during WWII and death… All topics explored in today’s featured titles:

I Need a Lifeguard Everywhere but the Pool by Lisa Scottoline, Francesca Serritella

“The Edgar Award–winning Scottoline and her writer daughter, Serritella, have been investigating human foibles in a series that now reaches its eighth title (following I’ve Got Sand in All the Wrong Places). Expect more wit and wisdom; with library marketing.”–LJ Pre-Pub Alert

Coming of Age: The Sexual Awakening of Margaret Mead by Deborah Beatriz Blum

“This biography gives us something equally rich: knowledge of her colorful, defiant, and courageous life—one of nonconformity, gender-bending, and paving new paths. VERDICT Through Blum’s narrative, Mead becomes more than a quotable female pioneer and transforms into a three-dimensional woman.” —Library Journal, starred review

Jane Austen at Home: A Biography by Lucy Worsley

“Worsley gives sharply drawn pictures of domesticity in the many homes that Austen inhabited, including her family’s rented houses in Bath and residences where she, her widowed mother, and sister visited as guests before they settled in Chawton, a site of pilgrimage for Janeites. A charming, well-researched journey to ‘Austen-land.’” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Her book is a lovely excavation of Austen’s home life, in which she provides readers access into places such as Pemberley without ever giving too much of herself away. This volume is sure to delight Austen fans, while Worsley’s examination of manuscripts will make new material accessible to scholars unable to visit the British Library, Hampshire Archives, Kent History and Library Centre, or the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Record Office.” — Library Journal, starred review

The Women Who Flew for Hitler: A True Story of Soaring Ambition and Searing Rivalry by Clare Mulley

“Biographer Mulley comes through in a major way with this deep dive into the lives of WWII–era German aviatrixes Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von Stauffenberg…Absolutely gripping, Mulley’s double portrait is a reminder that there are many more stories to tell from this oft-examined time.” — Booklist, starred review

“This compelling work has the drama and suspense of the best movie scripts. It is the perfect choice for lovers of narrative non-fiction, especially those interested in strong females.” — Library Journal, starred review

The Art of Death: Writing the Final Story by Edwidge Danticat

“From ‘The Art of’ series, this emotional, brave work interrogates and bears witness to the ultimate unknown. Will appeal to readers looking for warmth and insight—whatever their personal circumstance.” — Library Journal, starred review

“National Book Critics Circle Award winner Danticat…takes on an unpleasant topic with sensitivity and passion.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

White Man’s Game: Saving Animals, Rebuilding Eden, and Other Myths of Conservation in Africa by Stephanie Hanes

​”For every reader who has ever been inclined to support such heart-tugging philanthropic quests,​ ​Hanes provides a cautionary tale that reveals the complex motives behind such causes and the often​ ​fraudulent machinations needed to bring them to fruition.”–Booklist, starred review

LJ’s Spring 2017 Editors’ Picks

Library Journal recently revealed their Spring 2017 Editors’ Picks, including these three Macmillan books:

“Like many, I have always had an appreciation for all things Jane Austen, whether it be her original novels, their many retellings, or watching Colin Firth as Darcy famously emerge from a lake in a billowy white shirt. Now I’m awaiting Lucy Worsley’s JANE AUSTEN AT HOME (St. Martin’s, Jul.), which sees the author on an enviable research trip through Austen’s many residences, including childhood and holiday houses, schools, and the abodes of relatives. Worsley connects these spaces back to the fictional dwellings of Austen’s characters, emphasizing the thematic importance of home.” — Kate DiGirolomo, SELF-e Community Coordinator
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NPR’s Books of Summer Love

♫♪♫♫♪ Summer lovin, had me a blast;
summer lovin, happened so fast ♫♪♫♫♪
NPR shared their favorite romances in a Books of Summer Love segment, including these red hot reads from Macmillan:

Historical
The Wallflowers (series), by Lisa Kleypas 
Lisa Kleypas writes solid contemporary romances too, but this series about a quartet of 19th-century young women who band together to conquer the London marriage market was a favorite with our voters and our panelists.

Classics
THE FAR PAVILIONS by M.M. Kaye
An epic tale of forbidden love during the British Raj. British botanist’s son Ashton Pelham-Martyn is orphaned in India and raised to believe he’s an Indian boy named Ashok. Anjuli is a neglected princess, condemned first to an unwanted marriage and then to suttee when her husband dies — but happiness beckons for Ash and Anjuli in the “far pavilions” of the Himalayas, away from the prejudices that have kept them apart.

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE by Jane Austen
Jane Austen’s most famous work was one of your favorite picks (second only to the Outlander series). So much has been said about Elizabeth and Darcy that now their place in the romance canon goes without saying — we’ll just leave you with the mental image of Colin Firth diving into that lake.

JANE EYRE by Charlotte Bronte
A poor, mistreated heroine, a dour, misunderstood hero, and a mad wife locked in the attic — if that’s not romance, we don’t know what is! Reader, she did indeed marry him, and they lived happily ever after.

YA
ELEANOR & PARK by Rainbow Rowell
Rainbow Rowell’s story of two misfit kids who fall in love over mixtapes and comic books in 1980s Omaha, Neb., was one of our favorite books of 2013 — and a favorite with our voters, too. While the ending is slightly ambiguous, we choose to believe Eleanor and Park got their happily ever after. We love them too much not to! readmoreremove

An Austen Remix that Stands on its Own!

"Nobody, I believe, has ever found it possible to like the heroine of Mansfield Park." --Lionel Trilling

Well, that's been changed. Lynn Shepherd has taken the classic work and turned it on its head. Unlikeable characters are now charming. The honest now scheme. And now, there's a murder.

But Murder at Mansfield isn't just for the Jane Austen fan. It stands on its own as a fantastic mystery. Maybe you don't need zombies to bring new readers to the classics!

"First-timer Shepherd remains true to Austen's style while providing a sound pzuzle. Janeites may be delighted or appaled, but more impartial readers will find much to enjoy." Kirus Reviews (starred review)

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