Articles tagged "James Wood"

Happy #BookBday (6/5/18 Edition)

Happy #BookBday to these top-notch new releases!

HOW HARD CAN IT BE? by Allison Pearson
Also available in audio
A June 2018 LibraryReads pick with THREE starred reviews! Hilarious and poignant, the new adventures of Kate Reddy, the beleaguered heroine of Allison Pearson’s groundbreaking New York Times bestseller I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT. “Tackling sexism, growing older, and understanding one’s needs when catering to those of so many others, Pearson writes realism with all the fun of escapism.” — Booklist, starred review

KUDOS by Rachel Cusk
One of Publishers Weekly’s Spring 2018 Literary Fiction picks with THREE starred reviews! The critically acclaimed author of OUTLINE and TRANSIT, completes her “stunning” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) trilogy with a finale that examines the relationship between pain and honor, and investigates the moral nature of success as a precept of both art and living. “Brilliantly accomplished and uncompromisingly dark.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

TREEBORNE by Caleb Johnson
THREE starred reviews! “Using language rich as mulch, debut author Johnson tells the superb saga of three generations of Treebornes, who live near the town of Elberta in the southern reaches of Georgia. Sentence by loamy sentence, this gifted author digs up corpses and upends trees to create a place laden with magic and memory.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review and editor’s pick readmoreremove

Friday Reads: Memorial Day All Stars

Memorial Day weekend is here! Kick off your summer reading with our super-starred #FridayReads picks:

STAY HIDDEN by Paul Doiron
Also available in audio
“The plot is complex, and the action intense, made all the more so by forbidding terrain. The extraordinary sense of place makes this Doiron’s strongest novel yet.” — Booklist, starred review

“The shooting of investigative journalist Ariel Evans on Maine’s Maquoit Island drives Doiron’s outstanding ninth novel featuring game warden Mike Bowditch. Doiron balances nuanced characterizations and intelligent plotting perfectly.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

RUST & STARDUST by T. Greenwood
“This fictionalization of the 1948 kidnapping said to have inspired Nabokov’s LOLITA lures readers in with a disturbing hook: the dangers of innocence. This is a beautifully written, unnerving tragedy woven from equal measures of hope and menace.” — Booklist, starred review

“Readers who relish novels based on true events will be both riveted and disturbed by this retelling of one of America’s most famous abduction cases.” Library Journal, starred review

UPSTATE by James Wood
New Yorker book critic Wood contemplates deep questions while painting an indelible portrait of a family coming to grips, clarifying complex, recognizable problems as he moves his characters forward in ways that seem real and satisfying. Pitch perfect and highly recommended.” — Library Journal, starred review

“[A] masterful, inquisitive, funny, and provocative novel… But it is a father’s love for his daughters that propels Wood’s beautifully distilled, archly revelatory tale bright with wise insights and thoughtful tenderness.” Booklist, starred review readmoreremove

Publishers Weekly’s Best of Fall 2012

September is almost upon us and that means Fall titles are about to start showing up at your library waiting to be shelved!

At the beginning of August Publishers Weekly posted their list of The Best Books of Fall 2012, let's take another look at the Macmillan titles on that list, shall we?

SEPTEMBER

STORMDANCER by Jay Kristoff 

"Kristoff’s imaginative fantasy debut presents the feudal, dystopian Shima Empire, a menacing Japanese-inspired setting in which 'the lotus must bloom' even though it turns all it touches into a toxic wasteland. The innovative setting, fast-moving plot, vivid descriptions, and thrilling action scenes make this a refreshing addition to the steampunk canon."

THE SCIENTISTS: a Family Romance by Marco Roth

"In this powerfully forlorn debut memoir, literary critic Roth mines the silence and shame he experienced growing up on Central Park West in the 1980s and ’90s as his scientist father died of AIDS."

OCTOBER

MASTER OF THE MOUNTAIN: Thomas Jefferson and His Slaves by Henry Wiencek

"Written by NBCC-award winnig historian Wiencek (THE HAIRSTONS: An American Epic in Black and White), this meticulous account indicts not only Thomas Jefferson -- who referred to blacks as 'degraded and different' with 'no place in our country' -- but also modern apologists who wish to retain him as a moral standard of liberty. Wiencek’s vivid, detailed history casts a new slant on a complex man."

NOVEMBER

THE FUN STUFF by James Wood

"This collection of 23 essays gathered from the New Republic, the London Review of Books, and the New Yorker offers the latest proof that Wood (HOW FICTION WORKS) is one of the best readers writing today. Devouring these pieces back to back feels like having a long conversation about books with your most erudite, articulate, and excitable friend."

"We've combed through hundreds of books to find our favorites of what's on tap for the season," said Publishers Weekly.

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