Articles tagged "James Rebanks"

Furry Friends Roundup

These books about furry friends are #CuteOverload:

DOUG THE PUG: The King of Pop Culture by Leslie Mosier
Doug the Pug is the King of Pop Culture with over 7 million adoring fans on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat! He’s bumped noses with the hottest stars out there: Justin Bieber, Steven Tyler, Ed Sheeran, John Legend, and Chrissy Teigen, just to name a few. Did you catch him in Fall Out Boy’s latest music video? Doug’s a rising star, but he doesn’t let fame go to his head. He’s a simple dog with a great big heart.

PUMPKIN: The Raccoon Who Thought She Was a Dog by Laura L. Young
As a baby, Pumpkin the Raccoon was abandoned by her parents after falling out of a tree and breaking her leg. Taken in by a family with two rescue dogs, Toffee and Oreo, Pumpkin gained a new set of “parents” and a life of luxury in the Bahamas. Check out Pumpkin’s feature on Good Morning America! “…this book is cuteness overload and will appeal to all age groups.” — Library Journal

THE BEST CAT BOOK EVER: PART II by Kate Funk
AC the cat is back! And his owner Kate Funk has come up with some even more hilarious, increasingly ridiculous costumes for him to model, from Rosie the Riveter, to Max from Where the Wild Things Are, to Marty McFly.

THE SHEPHERD’S VIEW: Modern Photographs From an Ancient Landscape by James Rebanks
Two starred reviews! “Rebanks’ prose and the photographs make the landscape come alive, and woolly sheep pictured against beautiful craggy meadows will entice readers to dream of shepherding. A true gem.” — Booklist, starred review

SAD ANIMAL FACTS by Brooke Barker
Barker’s hand-illustrated collection of the Animal Kingdom’s more unfortunate truths is beyond hilarious and has an amazing book trailer.

DOGS WHO SERVE: Incredible Stories of Our Canine Military Heroes by Lisa Rogak
Military Working Dogs have played a vital role in the United States armed forces throughout history. In this celebration of their contributions to our nation, Lisa Rogak profiles these heroic dogs and showcases them in vivid photographs that capture the devotion and respect these amazing canines, their devoted handlers, and fellow soldiers share for each other. readmoreremove

Nonfiction Stars

The stars are aligning for these forthcoming nonfiction titles:

OF ARMS AND ARTISTS: The American Revolution Through Painters’ Eyes by Paul Staiti — THREE STARS!
“This is an impressive, ambitious undertaking, to tell the stories of five painters—Charles Willson Peale, John Singleton Copley, John Trumbull, Benjamin West, and Gilbert Stuart—while simultaneously showing how they were all interrelated and doing this against the complex history of the American Revolution. A lively, splendid history that captures the times with insight, acumen, and a juggler’s finesse.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Highly recommended for those who want to learn about the American Revolution, art history, and message in medium.” — Library Journal, starred review

“As he interprets a vast amount of material with vigor and pleasure, Staiti brings new vibrancy and meaning to boldly revolutionary paintings that both commemorate the suffering, conviction, and valor of a specific time and address the timeless struggle for justice and freedom.” Booklist, starred review

THE POPE OF PHYSICS: Enrico Fermi and the Birth of the Atomic Age by Gino Segrè & Bettina Hoerlin
“By placing stunning scientific advances into historical context, this engaging biography of Nobel Prize–winning Italian physicist Enrico Fermi (1901–1954) captures the life and times of one of the 20th century’s most creative and hard-working scientists. Segrè and Hoerlin draw an engaging portrait of a man with boundless curiosity who delighted in his work; fans of pop science and history will thoroughly enjoy this entertaining and accessible biography of a scientist who deserves to be better understood.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review
readmoreremove

Chicago Public Library’s 2015 Best of the Best Books

We’ve got 14 books on Chicago Public Library’s 2015 Best of the Best list! Selected by a team of CPL librarians, the list represents the year’s most outstanding titles, books of exceptional quality for a diverse, city-wide readership.

Fiction
A DARKER SHADE OF MAGIC by V.E. Schwab
JADE DRAGON MOUNTAIN by Elsa Hart
A MANUAL FOR CLEANING WOMEN by Lucia Berlin
THE NIGHTINGALE by Kristin Hannah (a top 10 fiction pick)
PURITY by Jonathan Franzen
THE SELLOUT by Paul Beatty

Nonfiction
DO NO HARM: Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery by Henry Marsh
DREAMLAND: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic by Sam Quinones
FURIOUSLY HAPPY by Jenny Lawson
ONE OF US: The Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway by Asne Seierstad
THE SHEPHERD’S LIFE by James Rebanks readmoreremove

Librarians “Read ‘n Rave” Their Favorite ALA Annual 2015 Picks!

Last Monday we rounded out a terrific ALA Annual 2015 with a standing-room only Read ‘n Rave panel (similar to BEA’s Shout ‘n Share) moderated by Booklist‘s Rebecca Vnuk. Here’s what the all-star collection development specialists found on the exhibit floor to share with you:

Seattle Public Library’s David Wright kicked it off with A BURGLAR’S GUIDE TO THE CITY by Geoff Manaugh, noting that “You don’t have to get very far in before you start casing every place you’re in.” He also mentioned GIVE US THE BALLOT by Ari Berman, saying that it’s incredibly important to the civil rights movement still occurring today.

Kansas City Public Library’s Kaite Mediatore Stover called Sally Hepworth’s THE THINGS WE KEEP, “A gut-puncher about early onset Alzheimer’s.”

Chicago Public Library’s Stephen Sposato had lots of love for many Macmillan books, starting with THE FISH LADDER by Katharine Norbury. He described it as a “very scenic” adoption story with the appeal of Cheryl Strayed’s WILD and THE SHEPHERD’S LIFE by James Rebanks. Sposato said that the BEA Buzz Book BLACK MAN IN A WHITE COAT by Damon Tweedy “lives up to the hype” and that it would make an excellent pair with neurosurgeon Henry Marsh’s DO NO HARM. His final recommendation was THE WAKE by Paul Kingsnorth, a postapocalyptic novel set after the Norman Invasion optioned for film by Mark Rylance (Wolf Hall).

Hillsboro Public Library’s Stephanie Chase (and several audience members) were crazy about Jenny Lawson’s FURIOUSLY HAPPY. Chase mentioned that you could get your picture taken with the giant cut-out in the Macmillan booth. She also gave two thumbs up for THE END OF ALL THINGS by John Scalzi and gave the briefest of shout outs for CARRY ON “because it’s Rainbow Rowell.”

Last but not least, King County Library System’s Alene Moroni enticed the audience with HOME IS BURNING by Dan Marshall after reading the tag line on the galley aloud (“For the Marshalls, laughter is the best medicine, especially when combined with alcohol, pain pills, excessive cursing, sexual escapades, actual medicine, and more alcohol.”), adding “these are MY people!”

Looking for more recommendations? Check out what Talia presented at the “Three’s Company” Book Buzz at ALA Annual!

It’s THE SHEPHERD’S LIFE For Me!

Ok, not really, but it is for James Rebanks. A shepherd living and working in the Lake District of Northern England, Rebanks impulsively started a Twitter account (@herdyshepherd1) and shared his ancient way of life, becoming a 21st century James Herriot.

Now his first book, THE SHEPHERD’S LIFE: Modern Dispatches from an Ancient Landscape, is out and the critics are flocking to it (sorry, we couldn’t help ourselves!):

Captivating… A book about continuity and roots and a sense of belonging in an age that’s increasingly about mobility and self-invention. Hugely compelling.”
— Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“I never imagined I’d be absorbed by a book about sheep. But James Rebanks’s unsentimental, sharply detailed memoir about his life as a shepherd in England’s Lake District gripped me from the first page.” — The Wall Street Journal

It is a gorgeous book, unsentimental but exultant, vivid and profound, and a fierce defense of small-scale farming against the twin threats of agribusiness and tourism.” National Geographic

“As moving, truthful and at times poetic as anything you’re likely to read… THE SHEPHERD’S LIFE is satisfying on every level.” — The Seattle Times

“It’s bloody marvelous.” — Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk

Plus features and interviews with Rebanks in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, and NPR’s “On Point with Tom Ashbrook,” with much more to come!

readmoreremove

css.php