Articles tagged "immigration"

Nonfiction Round-Up (4/17/19)

Conspiracy theories, immigration, and a call to arms–welcome to this week’s nonfiction round-up!

REPUBLIC OF LIES: American Conspiracy Theorists and Their Surprising Rise to Power by Anna Merlan

“Quick to condemn racist, anti-Semitic, homophobic, and anti-Muslim bias, the author supports her writing with excellent supporting documentation. An engaging and valuable explication of one of the most confusing and complex topics in today’s society.”–Library Journal

THE DEATH AND LIFE OF AIDA HERNANDEZ: A Border Story by Aaron Bobrow-Strain

Two starred reviews!
Check out more read-alikes from Booklist.

“In this caring and unforgettable borderland saga, Bobrow-Strain reveals the profound personal toll of the immigration crisis.”–Booklist, starred review

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Booklist Recommends: On Diversity and Immigration

Keep your patrons in the know with these two Booklist best of lists on diversity and immigration:

Top 10 Diverse Nonfiction

A BOUND WOMAN IS A DANGEROUS THING: The Incarceration of African American Women from Harriet Tubman to Sandra Bland by DaMaris Hill

“With a lyricism that sings, swings, and stings, poet and writer Hill reflects on black women who resisted violent racism and misogyny, ranging from the notable and notorious (Fannie Lou Hamer, Eartha Kitt, Ida B. Wells, Joanne Little) to lesser-known, no-less-heroic women.”–Booklist, starred review

FOR COLORED GIRLS WHO HAVE CONSIDERED POLITICS by Donna Brazile, Yolanda Caraway, Leah Daughtry, and Minyon Moore with Veronica Chambers

2019 NAACP Image Award Winner

“This trailblazing crew of black women, self-described ‘Colored Girls,’ have been in the room with power brokers since the 1960s and have wielded significant influence on Democratic presidential campaigns and administrations… Told with obvious deep respect and affection, this is a spirited look at the politics and personal lives of four iconic women.”–Booklist, starred review

Click here for the full Top 10 list.

Read-alikes: Tales from the Border

Have you read THE DEATH AND LIFE OF AIDA HERNANDEZ: A Border Story by Aaron Bobrow-Strain?

“In this caring and unforgettable borderland saga, Bobrow-Strain reveals the profound personal toll of the immigration crisis.”–Booklist, starred review

“This potent, important work, which ‘occupies a space between journalism and ethnography, with a dash of oral history and biography,’ adds much to the continuing immigration debate.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

If you loved THE DEATH AND LIFE OF AIDA HERNANDEZ, Booklist recommends these read-alikes.

For more similarly-themed title recommendations, click here.

#PubDay (2/26/19)

Pirates + Dragons, Mothers + Daughters, Sexy Scots + Smokin’ Cowboys–welcome to #pubday!

THE PRIORY OF THE ORANGE TREE by Samantha Shannon
A February 2019 LibraryReads Pick!
A March 2019 Indie Next Pick!
“This extraordinary saga includes heroism, romance, friendship, pirates, plague, diplomacy, and, of course, dragons. A well-drawn feminist fantasy with broad appeal for fans of the epic and readers of Zen Cho, Naomi Novik, and V. E. Schwab. Highly recommended.”–Booklist, starred review

MOTHER COUNTRY by Irina Reyn
Two starred reviews!
“In beautiful and emotionally perceptive prose, Reyn (THE IMPERIAL WIFE) probes the intimate ways cultures clash within individuals, forcing them to knit together disparate truths to make sense of the world, and provides a tender depiction of how mother-daughter bonds morph over time and space.”–Publishers Weekly, starred review

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Starred Reviews for Your #WeekendReads

For this week’s #WeekendReads, we present these forthcoming titles with multiple starred reviews!

THE DEATH AND LIFE OF AIDA HERNANDEZ by Aaron Bobrow-Strain
“In this caring and unforgettable borderland saga, Bobrow-Strain reveals the profound personal toll of the immigration crisis.”–Booklist, starred review

“This potent, important work, which ‘occupies a space between journalism and ethnography, with a dash of oral history and biography,’ adds much to the continuing immigration debate.”–Kirkus Reviews, starred review

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The BIG Book Club Resource Guide

Ready to rev up your library’s book club? Great! We’ve got a TON of resources to help:

Reading Group Gold is the destination for reading group news, sweepstakes and giveaways, early copies of upcoming books, and reading guides for select titles from Macmillan. You can also sign up for their newsletter.

Our “One Book, One City” community reading recommendations are a good source for discussable fiction AND nonfiction titles. View the current catalog here (backlist: 20182017, 2016, 2015, 2014).

Our NEA Big Read Picks (2018) and Indie Next Picks for Book Clubs are solid choices:

Summer 2018
Winter 2017-2018

We also recommend discussable titles during Booklist book club webinars and at other book buzzes. Don’t forget you can download these presentations to give in your own library!

Booklist’s “Macmillan Spring Fling” Webinar Titles
New Your Public Library’s “Fiction + Nonfiction” Book Buzz
ALA Midwinter 2019 Book Buzz

Invite an author to your library! These authors are willing to Skype in to book club meetings if they can’t attend in person.

Download a sortable spreadsheet (with ISBNs!!) of adult titles with reading group guides.

Our personal favorites include these timely titles on immigration, social justice, race relations, and feminism by Carol Anderson, Michael Eric Dyson, Diane Guerrero, Anthony Ray Hinton, and more.
And Seanan McGuire‘s Alex-Award winning Wayward Children series is highly discussable!

Top Macmillan Book Club titles (according to Bookscan rankings):

NIGHT by Elie Wiesel
BEING MORTAL by Atul Gawande
ANNIHILATION by Jeff VanderMeer (the Southern Reach trilogy)
A LONG WAY GONE by Ishmael Beah
All titles by Kristin Hannah, especially THE NIGHTINGALE, THE GREAT ALONE, and WINTER GARDEN
SALVAGE THE BONES & MEN WE REAPED by Jesmyn Ward
THE SPIRIT CATCHES YOU AND YOU FALL DOWN by Anne Fadiman
STILL LIFE by Louise Penny (Armand Gamache series)
MR. PENUMBRA’S 24-HOUR BOOKSTORE by Robin Sloan
GILEAD by Marilynne Robinson readmoreremove

Day’s YA – FLIGHT SEASON

Hi friends!

Happy end of summer! This delightful and summery (but also heartbreaking) novel is the perfect book to wrap up these last few days of August.

FLIGHT SEASON by Marie Marquardt
9781250107015
Available now from Wednesday Books
Ages 13 to 19

FLIGHT SEASON follows Vivi, a Yale student grappling with her father’s death; TJ, a nursing student paying his way by working at his family’s Brazilian restaurant; and Ángel, a patient at TJ’s hospital. To make up for her poor grades, Vivi spends the summer as a hospital aide, which is where the lives of our three main characters collide. As the trio grow closer, they learn more from each other than they ever believed possible.

If you are in NYC and saw someone crying on the R train while reading this book a few weeks ago, there’s a pretty good chance it was me. This beautiful novel tore my heart into pieces. The characters in this story are among the the most engaging I’ve ever encountered. They are each forced to navigate tough situations—financial difficulties, illness, death, and immigration laws—and they do it all with relatable humanity. They each have their own unique story to tell, but the ways in which their stories intertwine are unexpected and lovely. This novel is perfect for fans of heartrending tales, such as those by Anna-Marie McLemore and Nicola Yoon. readmoreremove

Required Friday Reading (8/10/18)

It’s important, now more than ever, to continue reading, reflecting, and engaging in open dialogue about the issues facing us all as a nation. Here are our picks to help you do just that:

A HOPE MORE POWERFUL THAN THE SEA: One Refugee’s Incredible Story of Love, Loss, and Survival by Melissa Fleming

2018 Alex Award Winner

2018 ALA Amelia Bloomer List

“This poignant tale of survival and loss gives immediacy to the plight of Syrian refugees. Fleming’s skillful writing brings new vividness to Doaa Al Zamel’s dramatic story. This book amply demonstrates why Al Zamel has since become a symbol of hope for other refugees. Fleming should be congratulated for bringing [this] inspiring and illuminating story to the page.” — Publishers Weekly

BUTTERFLY: From Refugee to Olympian – My Story of Rescue, Hope, and Triumph by Yusra Mardini

BUTTERFLY is a powerful story of survival, inspiration, and hope with a resounding message: no one chooses to be a refugee; rather, horrific circumstances force ordinary people to take extraordinary measures to save themselves. This unforgettable memoir shines a spotlight on the refugee experience and the role sports can play in giving a voice to those affected by conflict throughout the world… Teens who enjoyed I AM MALALA will find another heroine in this inspirational memoir of a Syrian swimmer who became an advocate for refugees.” Booklist, starred review

CITY OF THORNS: Nine Lives in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp by Ben Rawlence

Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist

Kirkus Reviews Best Books of the Year

“[A] remarkable book…Like Dadaab itself, the story has no conclusion. It is a portrait, beautifully and movingly painted. And it is more than that. At a time when newspapers are filled with daily images of refugees arriving in boats on Europe’s shores, when politicians and governments grapple with solutions to migration and erect ever larger walls and fences, it is an important reminder that a vast majority of the world’s refugees never get as far as a boat or a border of the developed world.” — Caroline Moorehead, The New York Times Book Review

IN THE COUNTRY WE LOVE: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero

“Guerrero relates her struggle to hold her life together, get through high school and college, and find her feet in the world—challenges that will resonate with many readers… [She] writes with humor and heartbreaking honesty. Offering readers the story she needed to hear as a child, Guerrero shines a light on this country’s flawed immigration system, eloquently calling for reform without diminishing her appreciation for the opportunities US citizenship has afforded her. A timely and enlightening read.” — Booklist

SPARE PARTS: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis

“A gratifying human interest story that calls attention to the plight and promise of America’s undocumented youth.” — Library Journal

“Davis takes what could have been another feel-good story of triumphant underdogs and raises the stakes by examining the difficulties of these young immigrants in the context of the societal systems that they briefly and temporarily overcame.” — Publishers Weekly

ONE PERSON, NO VOTE: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy by Carol Anderson

“This whiplash-inducing chronicle of how a nation that just a few short years ago elected its first black president now finds itself in the throes of a deceitful and craven effort to rip this most essential of American rights from millions of its citizens.” — Booklist, starred review

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Buzzfeed’s “Amazing New Books You Need To Read This Spring” 2018

Poetry, essays, short stories… these Buzzfeed-recommended books will spring off your library’s shelves!

WADE IN THE WATER by Tracy K. Smith
US Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith returns with WADE IN THE WATER, a new collection of poems that feels both timely and timeless. In lines that are as lyrical as they are wise (and so poignant you’ll want to write them down immediately), Smith makes connections between the current state of American culture and its history — police brutality, slavery, immigration, the Civil War, the Declaration of Independence (which she turns into an erasure poem). What does it mean to be an American, to be a woman in a society still dominated by men? Smith captures memories, found language, music, and the voices of the past to get to the beating heart of our nation today — and you’ll feel it in every fiber of your being while reading.

A LUCKY MAN by Jamel Brinkley
The nine stories in Jamel Brinkley’s collection A LUCKY MAN are about black men grappling with their place in the world, their pasts, their friendships, and their families — boys coming of age and encountering firsthand how privilege is tied to race and class, brothers navigating strained relationships, parents and children disappointing each other. Brinkley shows both the great beauty and ugliness of humanity — but always with empathy — and captures the ways in which our world is defined and divided by power. A LUCKY MAN so real and alive, much like its characters, that you’ll be eager to read whatever Brinkley writes next.

EYE LEVEL by Jenny Xie
US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Hererra chose Jenny Xie as the winner of the Academy of American Poets’ 2017 Walt Whitman Award, and it’s easy to see why in her debut collection EYE LEVEL. Xie’s poems take us on a journey to new places (Vietnam, Cambodia, even a Greek island) in such vivid detail that you’ll feel as if you really traveled, as well as to new questions about immigration, identity, and loneliness. How do we really find home? What do we lose when we leave? Reading EYE LEVEL feels like taking a trip with someone who truly sees you, and the world, as it is. readmoreremove

Our #LibFaves17 Picks

We enjoyed seeing so many of you participate in #LibFaves17 (thanks for making Jane Harper’s THE DRY an official 2017 Top Ten pick!).

Now here are OUR #LibFaves17 picks (aka our 2017 “Recommended Reads” from the newsletter):

Talia

THE MAP THAT LEADS TO YOU by J.P. Monninger
Also available in audio
Finally, a book version of that romantic trilogy of films that Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy collaborated on… And most especially reminiscent of BEFORE SUNRISE. I’m also fondly reminded of the first boy that I ever fell in love with, his name was Lenny Grant, we were both sixteen and attending a summer writing program in Boston. It may as well have been Europe…

THE STANDARD GRAND by Jay Baron Nicorvo
THE STANDARD GRAND is reminiscent of Frank Bill’s CRIMES IN SOUTHERN INDIANA in terms of its grittiness and the ragtag group of misfit anti-heroes trying to survive in the wilderness. And I’ve always loved reading novels that were written in a sort of rushed exuberance—as if the author just had to share his or her story…

KNIFE CREEK by Paul Doiron
Also available in audio
Paul Doiron’s Mike Bowditch (my favorite bad-ass—does everything on his own terms—Maine game warden) is back for more! In KNIFE CREEK, Mike and his girlfriend Stacy (a bit of a rogue operator herself) are hunting wild rampaging boars that are destroying their beautiful town and surrounding environs. During the hunt, the couple discovers a dead infant in a shallow grave. Mike is a game warden but he’s got the instincts of a seasoned detective and must find out who committed such a gruesome deed. He just can’t help himself. And I love him for that. A home explosion that nearly kills him, an encounter with two very strange “sisters” wearing matching red wigs—one of whom may or may not be a long-dead co-ed (or was she kidnapped?), and a small town that’s full of suspects… Mike’s clearly on to something here, but what?

FRESH COMPLAINT by Jeffrey Eugenides
Also available in audio
I’ve always loved short story collections (see Shobha Rao’s AN UNRESTORED WOMAN, Tom Perrotta’s NINE INCHES, David Bezmozgis’ NATASHA, Helen Ellis’ AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE, Lauren Holmes’ BARBARA THE SLUT, James Franco’s PALO ALTO). The intensity of dipping into a life, briefly, and popping right out of it again… Of meeting someone at a particularly vulnerable and strangely fascinating moment in their lives… Of sharing that moment with them but never fully knowing when it began or where it ends is particularly exciting to me. And in Jeffrey Eugenides’ new short story collection FRESH COMPLAINT, meditations abound on life at every stage and at its most banally bizarre moments. Readers are thrown into a period of post-college idealism (and dysentery), mid-life pregnancies (and an ensuing tragicomedy), rebuilding after failure, sex studies in the jungle (and leaving one’s inhibitions behind), the worshiping of a musical instrument, a green card marriage and finally death. And we are treated to it all with a healthy dose of slightly off-beat characters.

THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Also available in audio
There’s a marketing specialist at Macmillan whose taste in books I trust completely. I will not name names, because she is my secret “book Santa” and I refuse to share her. Since 2004, she has very occasionally sent me manuscripts to read. She has always chosen a book that I end up loving, hating deeply, or at the very least ends up inciting an incredibly visceral reaction. I won’t list the favorites she’s sent, because her identity will most certainly be revealed. And now let’s talk about her latest manuscript, THE WIFE BETWEEN US. There is no train. There is no girl. There is drinking (all good stories need alcohol, right?). There is an unreliable narrator (but those are the most intriguing, aren’t they?). There is a handsome husband (marriages are always fascinating to dissect, good or bad!). There is “another” woman (a thriller always needs a mysterious “other,” right?). And that’s all I can tell you. Read it. And let’s talk about that ending.

INDECENT by Corinne Sullivan
An insecure shy teacher’s apprentice barely out of college at an all boys boarding school is tempted by the popular boy… He’s brash, he’s arrogant, he’s the leader of the pack… But, will she do what’s right? I can’t help but think of the only younger man that I ever dated. During the summer before I went off to college I dated a rising senior. He wore Polo cologne, had long hair and we spent most of that summer in hidden corners and behind closed doors. But it’s not the same, is it? readmoreremove

Teen Talk Tuesday (10/18/16 Edition)

Hey hey, YA librarians! We’ve got a bunch of new teen and YA-OK adult books for you this month. Check ’em out then share your favorites during today’s Early Word YA Galley Chat (hashtag: #ewgcya).

WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS by Anna-Marie McLemore
Ages 12 to 18
Longlisted for the 2016 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature and three starred reviews! From Morris Award finalist Anna-Marie McLemore comes a second stunning novel tinged with magic, about a girl with roses that grow from her wrist who happens to be hiding the truth, a boy with past secrets who paints moons and hangs them in trees, and four sisters rumored to be witches, who could ruin them both. “With luminous prose infused with Latino folklore and magical realism, this mixes fairy-tale ingredients with the elegance of a love story, with all of it rooted in a deeply real sense of humanity. Lovely, necessary, and true.” — Booklist, starred review

MOON CHOSEN by P.C. Cast
Ages 12 to 18
#1 New York Times bestselling author, P.C. Cast, returns with a new epic fantasy. Mari is an Earth Walker, heir to the unique healing powers of her Clan; but she has cast her duties aside, until she is chosen by a special animal ally, altering her destiny forever. When a deadly attack tears her world apart, Mari reveals the strength of her powers and the forbidden secret of her dual nature as she embarks on a mission to save her people. “While many fantasy series style themselves as epic, this one may actually be worthy of the description. Fantasy lovers who are fans of Cinda Williams Chima’s ‘Seven Realms’ novels will fall in love with Mari and Nik.”
School Library Journal

HOW TO KEEP A BOY FROM KISSING YOU by Tara Eglington
Ages 12 to 18
Aurora Skye is sweet sixteen and never been kissed—and that’s the way she wants it to be. But when she’s cast in her high school’s production of Much Ado About Nothing, she must avoid having her first kiss with Hayden Paris, her co-star, next door neighbor, and the bane of her existence. OR IS HE? “Eglington celebrates female friendship and loyalty, too, and Aurora’s sunny outlook will satisfy readers looking for a romantic comedy with a dash of Shakespeare.”
Publishers Weekly

MIDNIGHT HOUR by C.C. Hunter (Shadow Falls series)
Ages 12 to 18
In the conclusion to the New York Times bestselling Shadow Falls saga, Miranda Kane is preparing to graduate when a near-death experience threatens to ruin it all.

ROLLING BLACKOUTS: Dispatches from Turkey, Syria, and Iraq by Sarah Glidden
In this graphic novel, cartoonist Glidden details her two-month long journey through Turkey, Iraq, and Syria as she accompanies two reporters while they research stories on the Iraq War’s effect on the Middle East and, specifically, the war’s refugees. “Glidden’s understated, face-focused illustration style gets under your skin—by removing her own personality from the writing, the author sucks readers in so deeply that you really feel present, seeing her journey through her eyes.”
Library Journal, starred review

SHIRLEY JACKSON’S “THE LOTTERY”: The Authorized Graphic Adaptation by Miles Hyman
Available simultaneously in trade paperback
Two starred reviews! Published in time for Jackson’s centennial, this graphic adaptation masterfully reimagines her iconic story with a striking visual narrative created by her grandson, Miles Hyman. “A stunning graphic adaptation of a chilling classic.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review readmoreremove

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