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Most Anticipated Books of 2018

Best of 2017 has come and gone, now here are the most anticipated books of 2018, according to major media:
Entertainment Weekly50 books we can’t wait to read in 2018

THE HAZEL WOOD by Melissa Albert
One of the most anticipated debuts of the year — having set off an auction frenzy — THE HAZEL WOOD is a contemporary fantasy of an aggressively literary bent, centered on a 17-year-old whose mother is stolen away.

LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE by Sloane Crosley
Crosley may have put essays aside for her 2015 novel THE CLASP, but she returns with her particular brand of sardonic wit in this new collection. The tone, she told EW, is “somewhere between jaded misanthrope and easily amused child.”

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies and Leadership by James Comey
What will James Comey reveal in this anticipated memoir? Publisher Flatiron Books isn’t giving much away, just saying that the former FBI director promises to give a vital lesson on sound leadership, drawing on his own experiences to provide a manual that certain world leaders desperately need.

USA Today10 big books to kick off 2018

THE WIFE BETWEEN US by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
What it’s about: In this twisty psychological thriller, a woman dumped by her rich husband is determined to prevent his remarriage to her “replacement.”
Why it’s hot: Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Partners, which brought THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN to the big screen, has picked up film rights for THE WIFE BETWEEN US.

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies and Leadership by James Comey
What it’s about:
The former FBI director, famously fired by President Trump in May, writes a book about leadership based on his own experiences and observations in government.
Why it’s hot: According to the publisher, Comey’s book will examine what “good, ethical leadership looks like and how it drives sound decisions.” The burning question: What will he say about Trump?

The Washington PostLeadership Books to Read in 2018

A HIGHER LOYALTY: Truth, Lies and Leadership by James Comey
The former FBI director — fired by President Trump and now, some say, a Zen-like master of throwing subtle shade on Twitter and Instagram — inked what was reported to be a multi-million dollar book deal in August. The book’s publisher has said the book by Comey, also a former Justice Department official and lawyer, promises to give readers “unprecedented entry into the corridors of power, and a remarkable lesson in leadership itself.” Comey, who frequently uses social media to share quotations about character, justice, leadership and power, tweeted an image of the Statue of Liberty on Dec. 5, saying he was in New York to meet with his publisher, with the note: “Hope leadership book will be useful. Reassuring to see Lady Liberty standing tall even in rough weather.”

InStyleBooks We Can’t Wait to Read in 2018

THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
A Vietnam POW returns from overseas and opts to relocate his family to a remote area of Alaska, far removed from the threats of war-torn societies, for a fresh start. All seems well until his PTSD kicks in during the harsh winter and turns their tiny cabin dream into a living nightmare.

LOOK ALIVE OUT THERE by Sloane Crosley
If accolades from Steve Martin and David Sedaris are any indication, Sloane Crosley’s new collection of essays delivers, with hilarious takes on fertility, mingling with swingers, and her blink-and-you’ll-miss-it cameo on Gossip Girl.

EsquireThe 27 Most Anticipated Books of 2018

OLIVER LOVING by Stefan Merrill Block
Oliver Loving has been paralyzed and locked in his own mind for nearly a decade, the result of a shooting in his small Texas town. In Stefan Merrill Block’s psychologically astute novel, the damaged people that surround Oliver try to piece together their own versions of what happened that night and since then, even as doctors prepare a new treatment that might help Oliver communicate again.

THE HAZEL WOOD by Melissa Albert
Here is one of those rare young adult fantasy novels that holds a self-contained world in only a few hundred pages. So much world-building, so little space. If the novel’s heroine is a teenage girl, then her story will appeal to readers of all ages, with its intrigue and strange fairy tale magic and very grown up writing.

WHAT ARE WE DOING HERE? by Marilynne Robinson
Even in her fiction, Marilynne Robinson has a nonjudgmental, earnest way of writing about religion that could make an atheist long for spirituality. President Obama is a fan. In this essay collection theology and current events and philosophy take center stage, and it’s through the clarity of Robinson’s words that hope in times of political strife feels appropriate and urgent.

SOME HELL by Patrick Nathan
A heartbreaker of a book, Patrick Nathan’s debut novel captures the hell of adolescence under particularly dire circumstances: Colin is reeling from his father’s suicide even as he navigates coming of age as a gay teenager. As they are wont to do, sex and death dominate Colin’s thoughts as he makes his way, in agony but with an eye towards a hopeful future.

THE MERRY SPINSTER: Tales of Everyday Horror by Mallory Ortberg
Look out, Angela Carter. There’s a new feminist fairy tale queen in town, and her imagination is as sharp as her wit. Ortberg, co-founder of the beloved website The Toast, takes her column “Children’s Stories Made Horrific” to new heights in this collection of twisted tales that will shock and delight you.

Elle19 of the Best Books to Read This Winter

THREE DAUGHTERS OF EVE by Elif Shafak
From the most widely read female writer in Turkey, here’s a novel that sees violence and nostalgia vie for one woman’s attention on one intense night. In Istanbul, a relatively minor crime—an attempted robbery—sparks a wave of memories as the wealthy Peri ponders an old photograph of her college friends. As terrorist attacks break out, the religious and cultural differences between the three women demand her attention in the fraught present.

WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Asha Bandele
Patrisse Khan-Cullors co-founded one of the most vital activist groups of recent years. Now, get to the heart of Black Lives Matter with her account of how the movement began, and marvel at the brilliance and persistence of her mission despite a continuing lack of understanding and compassion from many.

PEACH by Emma Glass
In the wake of a horrific sexual assault, titular protagonist Peach attempts to navigate a life that has tilted on its axis. As accounts of sexual assault and misconduct have arisen in recent months, our inability to reckon with such events and their aftermath has only become more clear. This short novel—under 100 pages—confronts the enormity with impressionistic grace.

FORCE OF NATURE by Jane Harper
Wow, this crime novel just gave me my newest nightmare: Five colleagues go on a hike (first mistake), and one doesn’t return. Four different stories makes it hard for Agent Aaron Falk (whom we met in Harper’s debut, THE DRY) to discern the truth. Don’t read this one during the workweek.

WHAT ARE WE DOING HERE? by Marilynne Robinson
Equipped with a heart and mind that seem more capacious than ours (though she might have a match in fan Barack Obama), Marilynne Robinson has made a career out of writing life-expanding novels and wonderings, like Pulitzer Prize–winning novel GILEAD. Soon, she’ll give us a new set of essays about faith, life, and culture. readmoreremove

All-in-One “Best Books of 2017”

*drumroll please* For your collection development joy, here are all of our “Best Books of 2017” lists in one place!

Publishers Weekly

Kirkus Reviews Fiction, Nonfiction, Teen

Library Journal — Best Books of 2017 & Notable Books of 2017

School Library Journal‘s Best Adult Books 4 Teens

Booklist Editors’ Choice 2017

New York Times Book Review Top 10 & Editor’s Choice picks

New York Times Notable Books

Washington Post

Los Angeles Times

People Magazine

Time Magazine

GQ Magazine

Vulture (New York Magazine)

Huffington Post

Buzzfeed

NPR’s Book Concierge

Goodreads Choice Awards nominees

Chicago Public Library “Best of the Best of 2017

See all these titles in Macmillan’s Best Books of 2017 Edelweiss collection. #CollectionDevelopmentMadeEasy

Libraries in the News

Woe to the person who says, “Libraries are dead.”

Remember back in October when the U.K.’s New York Observer columnist Andre Walker claimed no one goes to public libraries any more?

(It ended with Walker conceding, “Your sheer numbers have proved the point that libraries aren’t as unpopular as I believed this morning. Please stop replying. I surrender.”)

Our own Con Lehane wrote an op ed in Huffington Post about libraries and privacy issues.

In my most recent book, MURDER IN THE MANUSCRIPT ROOM, one of the characters, a librarian, says after discovering she’d been under surveillance in the library and elsewhere, “Everybody’s spying on everybody.”

You’d think no institution in the nation cares much about privacy protections anymore. But you’d be wrong. There’s at least one place in the nation’s cities, towns, and most villages that respects our privacy. Public libraries care passionately about protecting the confidentiality of library users.

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People, Time Magazine, HuffPo & More “Best of 2017” Picks

People Magazine‘s Top 10 Books of 2017

THE VANITY FAIR DIARIES by Tina Brown
THIS IS HOW IT ALWAYS IS by Laurie Frankel

Time Magazine

Fiction (full list)
THE NINTH HOUR by Alice McDermott
TRANSIT by Rachel Cusk

Nonfiction (full list)
THE VANITY FAIR DIARIES by Tina Brown
THE MEANING OF MICHELLE: 16 Writers on the Iconic First Lady and How Her Journey Inspires Our Own by Veronica Chambers

Huffington Post‘s Best Fiction Books of 2017

THE ANSWERS by Catherine Lacey
HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado
MARLENA by Julie Buntin
THE DARK DARK by Samantha Hunt
BORNE by Jeff VanderMeer
GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong

GQ‘s Best Books of 2017

GHOSTS OF THE TSUNAMI: Death and Life in Japan’s Disaster Zone by Richard Lloyd Parry
LIFE IN CODE: A Personal History of Technology by Ellen Ullman
LOCKING UP OUR OWN: Crime and Punishment in America by James Forman Jr.

Vulture’s (New York Magazine) 10 Best Books of 2017

NOTES ON A FOREIGN COUNTRY: An American Abroad in a Post-American World by Suzy Hansen
SO MUCH BLUE by Percival Everett

Slate (Laura Miller’s) 10 Favorite Books of 2017

THE AGE OF ANGER: A History of the Present by Pankaj Mishra
LIFE IN CODE: A Personal History of Technology by Ellen Ullman

Buzzfeed’s Best Fiction Books of 2017

HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES by Carmen Maria Machado
GOODBYE, VITAMIN by Rachel Khong
MARLENA by Julie Buntin
THE DARK DARK by Samantha Hunt

See these and many more titles in Macmillan’s Best Books of 2017 Edelweiss collection. We’ll update it as more “Best of 2017” lists come in. #CollectionDevelopmentMadeEasy

A Gem On Our Radar: GUTSHOT

What is a gem? A gem is a title that we hadn’t necessarily been tracking but the superlative praise rolling in is telling us to take a second look!

Amelia Gray’s collected stories in GUTSHOT, which is receiving wonderful praise, is just that gem:

“Strange, fable-like, and physical, Gray’s stories are driven by uncanny forces and set in organic yet unnatural worlds. Gray dazzlingly renders the wide array of human experience in these potent, haunting stories.” Publishers Weekly, boxed & starred review

“The best of Gray’s stories find that balance between devastation and humor and navigate an uneasy territory with agility; in this book, there are many that reach that mark.” — Kirkus Reviews

The New Yorker excerpted Amelia Gray’s story “Labyrinth” (read it here) and ran a terrific interview with Gray on their Page Turner blog.

Keep an eye out for more upcoming coverage of GUTSHOT in O Magazine, Marie Claire, the Chicago Tribune, Huffington Post, a Barnes & Noble Review, and more.
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Bonus Buzz for DE POTTER’S GRAND TOUR

There’s just so much happening for Joanna Scott’s recently published DE POTTER’S GRAND TOUR, we can’t help but #humblebrag:

It was an Editors’ Choice in the Sunday New York Times Book Review (9/19) and was featured in the “Newly Released Books” section of the New York Times (9/24), which called Scott “versatile and talented” and her book “elegant.”

It was also featured in a USA Today mystery roundup by our very own Charles Finch, who called the book “moving” and compared it to the work of Penelope Fitzgerald and W.G. Sebald (he also recommended Julia Keller’s SUMMER OF THE DEAD).

Last but not least, it was Huffington Post’s “The Book We’re Talking About” feature, which called the book “charming” and “poignant.”

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Scott Turow on the Value of Free Access to Knowledge

Author and Authors Guild president Scott Turow is not sitting quietly by as libraries lose funding. Earlier this week, Turow published an article in the Huffington Post acknowledging that state and municipal governments continue to struggle with diminished budgets, but lamenting, "public libraries nationwide have been one of the biggest and least deserved losers in the process."

The article focuses on what Turow sees to be the major virtues of public libraries today:

"For Americans facing job losses, working to gain new skills and seeking assistance in an increasingly digital world, U.S. public libraries are first responders."

"For thousands and thousands of American kids, libraries are the only safe place they can find to study, a haven free from the dangers of street or the numbing temptations of television."

"Most important of all," he writes, "a library within a community stands as a testimonial to its values, its belief in universal access to literature and knowledge."

Read the full article here!

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